Aryan certificate

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A 1943 Ariernachweis
Ahnenpass
Ahnentafel used as Ariernachweis
Page 41

In Nazi Germany, the Aryan certificate (German: Ariernachweis) was a document which certified that a person was a member of the Aryan race. Beginning in April 1933 it was required from all employees and officials in the public sector, including education, according to the Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service. It was also a primary requirement to become a Reich citizen, for those who were of Aryan blood and wanted to become Reich citizens.

There were two main types.

  • Kleiner Ariernachweis" ("Lesser Aryan certificate") was one of:
  • "Großer Ariernachweis" ("Greater Aryan certificate") was required for compliance with the requirements of "Reichserbhofgesetz" (land heritage law) and membership in the Nazi party. This certificate had to trace the family pedigree down to 1800 (and to 1750 for SS officers). According to the especially strict regulation of this law which included the goal of "Preserving the Purity of German Blood"[1] only those were eligible who could prove (reaching back to January 1, 1800) that "none of their paternal nor their maternal ancestors had Jewish or colored blood".[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Quotation in German: "Reinhaltung des deutschen Blutes"; in: Isabel Heinemann. "Rasse Siedlung, deutsches Blut", Wallstein Verlag, 1999, ISBN 3-89244-623-7, p. 54
  2. ^ Quotation in German: "wer unter seinen Vorfahren väterlicherseits oder mütterlicherseits kein jüdisches oder farbiges Blut hat"; in: Isabel Heinemann. "Rasse Siedlung, deutsches Blut", Wallstein Verlag, 1999, ISBN 3-89244-623-7, p. 54
  • Nicholas John Fogg, 'German genealogy during the Nazi period (1933-1945)', in Genealogists' Magazine, vol. 30, no. 9 (London: March 2012) pages 347-362.