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Ashlyn Harris

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Ashlyn Harris
Ashlyn Harris 2012 5.jpg
Harris with FCR 2001 Duisburg in 2013
Personal information
Full name Ashlyn Michelle Harris[1]
Date of birth (1985-10-19) October 19, 1985 (age 31)
Place of birth Satellite Beach, Florida, United States
Height 5 ft 9 in (175 cm)[2]
Playing position Goalkeeper
Club information
Current team
Orlando Pride
Number 1
Youth career
2001–2004 Satellite High School
College career
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2006–2009 North Carolina Tar Heels 77 (0)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2009 Pali Blues 5 (0)
2010 Saint Louis Athletica 0 (0)
2010 Washington Freedom 9 (0)
2011–2012 Western New York Flash 18 (0)
2012–2013 FCR 2001 Duisburg 8 (0)
2013–2015 Washington Spirit 46 (0)
2013 Tyresö FF (loan) 7 (0)
2016– Orlando Pride 15 (0)
National team
2000–2004 United States U-19 39 (0)
2005–2006 United States U-21
2013– United States 11 (0)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of May 20, 2016.

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of November 10, 2016

Ashlyn Michelle Harris (born October 19, 1985) is an American soccer player and FIFA Women's World Cup champion who is currently a goalkeeper for the United States women's national soccer team and Orlando Pride in the National Women's Soccer League, the highest division of women's soccer in the United States. She made her debut for the senior national team on March 11, 2013 and was a member of the championship–winning team at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup in Vancouver, Canada.

Harris played college soccer for the University of North Carolina Tar Heels and helped the team win three NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Championships. Professionally, Harris has played for the Saint Louis Athletica, Washington Freedom, and Western New York Flash of Women's Professional Soccer as well as FCR 2001 Duisburg of Bundesliga (women) in Germany and Tyresö FF of the Swedish Damallsvenskan. She has played for the Orlando Pride since 2016.

Early life[edit]

Born to Tammye and Mike Harris in Cocoa Beach, Florida, Ashlyn was raised with her older brother, Chris.[3][4] Growing up, she looked up to her brother and frequently joined him and his friends skateboarding and surfing.[5] Until the age of 14, she played club soccer with the boys teams. She first played for the Palm Bay Rangers and South Brevard United before playing for the Seminole Ice girls team. In 2003, Harris won the state championship with the U-17 Indialantic Force.[4][6]

Harris attended Satellite High School in Satellite Beach, where she played soccer under coach Fitzgerald Haig.[7] Harris helped the team win state championship titles her sophomore and junior year in 2002 and 2003.[8] Following her senior season, Harris was named the nation's number one recruit by Soccer America.[9] She was then named 2004 Gatorade Player of the Year[10] and 2004 NSCAA Player of the Year.[3] At the end of her high school career, Harris was a four-time Parade Magazine All-American, a four-time NSCAA Youth All-American, and a McDonald's All-American.[9] She was the first female to be named to four consecutive Parade All-American soccer teams.[11] She was named Florida Player of the Year for her last two years at Satellite High School.[11] Harris also made All-Conference, All-District, and All-States teams for all fours years. In her 65 career games at Satellite High School, she recorded 50 shutouts and had 0.29 goals against average.[8] She graduated in May 2004 with a 3.8 GPA.[11]

North Carolina Tar Heels, 2006–2009[edit]

Harris signed with the University of North Carolina Tar Heels to play for head coach Anson Dorrance. Due to national team commitments for the FIFA U-19 Women's World Cup in Thailand in the fall of 2004, Harris delayed her enrollment and did not start training with the Tar Heels until the spring of 2005.[12] During one spring practice, a ball caught her right hand as she was warming up and shattered her thumb. After a surgery that inserted three pins in her thumb, she was put on the bench until the summer.[12]

Harris with the Tar Heels during the NCAA final against Notre Dame on December 3, 2006.

At her first practice back with the Tar Heels in the summer of 2005, Harris tore her right anterior cruciate ligament, which kept her out for the entire 2005 season.[6] Despite being hurt, Harris still made the 2006 Atlantic Coast Conference Academic Honor Roll team.[6]

After recovering from her ACL injury, Harris returned to practice with the Tar Heels in the spring of 2006. However, she then tore her left ACL during a training camp with the U-21 Women's National Team in June 2006.[6][12] She was able to make it back in time for the 2006 NCAA Women's Soccer Tournament in November, although she came in as a substitute in every game, a strategy employed by Dorrance.[13] She played in all six NCAA Tournament matches, including the championship game against Notre Dame, a 2–1 win for UNC.[6][14] Harris was named to the 2007 ACC Academic Honor Roll at the end of her sophomore year.[6]

During the 2007 season, Harris was diagnosed with a torn labrum in her right hip which occurred during a goal kick. Harris did not miss any games following the injury and instead switched to mainly using her left leg and dealt with the pain.[12] Dorrance again employed the two-goalkeeper method, as Harris split time with junior goalkeeper, Anna Rodenbough. The two goalkeepers alternated starts and played for half of each game. Harris played in 19 games and made 9 starts, playing a total of 1120 minutes. She allowed nine goals and recorded 29 saves, giving a 0.763 save percentage.[6] UNC lost their match against Notre Dame in the third round of the 2007 NCAA Women's Soccer Tournament on November 24, 2007.[15]

The 2008 season was the first season where Harris was healthy for the entire season.[12] Dorrance again employed Harris in the two-goalkeeper system along with Rodenbough. Harris played in 27 games and made 13 starts, playing a total of 1233 minutes. She allowed nine goals and recorded 28 saves, giving a 0.757 save percentage.[6] In the 2008 NCAA Women's Soccer Tournament, Harris appeared in second half of the third round match against Illinois, where she made three saves,[16] as well as the semi-final match against UCLA, where she again made three saves.[17] She appeared in goal in the championship game against Notre Dame, which UNC won 2–1.[18]

Harris returned for the 2009 season, the first season in which she did not share the position with another goalkeeper.[4] She started all 25 of her appearances for the team, playing a total of 2163 minutes in goal. She allowed 10 goals in 25 games, recording 45 saves for a 0.818 save percentage and 0.42 goals against average.[19] UNC went on to win the 2009 NCAA Women's Soccer Tournament after a 1–0 win over Stanford in the championship game.[20]

College Summary[edit]

Year GP/GS Min GA GAA Saves Pct SO Record
2006[21] 6/0 247 3 1.09 7 .700 0 2-0-0
2007[22] 19/9 1220 9 0.66 29 .763 3 10-1-1
2008[23] 27/13 1233 9 0.66 28 .757 0 10-0-1
2009[24] 25/25 2163 10 0.42 45 .818 12 21-3-1
Totals 77/47 4863 31 0.57 109 - 15 43-4-3

Club career[edit]

Pali Blues, 2009[edit]

On April 16, 2009, Harris and UNC teammate Whitney Engen signed with the Pali Blues of the W-League.[25] The W-League was often used by college players as a summer playing option because of its status as an open league, allowing college players to maintain eligibility.[26] Harris made five appearances with the team for the 2009 season during the summer before her senior year at UNC.[3][25] The Pali Blues went undefeated in the regular season and then went on to win the W-League Championship with a 2–1 win over Washington Freedom in the final.[27]

Saint Louis Athletica, 2010[edit]

Harris with Saint Louis Athletica in 2010

Harris was selected with the 19th pick in the 2010 WPS Draft by Saint Louis Athletica of Women's Professional Soccer on January 15, 2010.[28] During her time with Athletica, Harris trained alongside United States women's national team starting goalkeeper Hope Solo. The goalkeeper coach for the national team, Paul Rogers, was also on the staff for Athletica, providing another benefit for Harris. Regarding her situation with Athletica, Harris stated that she "was probably in the best situation possible as a rookie goalkeeper."[29] On May 27, 2010, six weeks into the second season of Women's Professional Soccer, Saint Louis Athletica ceased operations due to financial problems. Harris did not appear in any of the six games for Saint Louis before the dissolution. Harris, as well as all others on the Athletica roster, became free agents on June 1.[30]

Washington Freedom, 2010[edit]

On June 2, 2010, Harris signed with the Washington Freedom following the dissolution of Saint Louis Athletica. After signing with the Freedom, Harris stated that her contributions to the team would not be through starting and playing, as Erin McLeod was the starting goalkeeper for the team at the time.[31] On July 24, McLeod suffered an ACL tear during a match against FC Gold Pride. Brianna Scurry, the back-up for the Freedom, had suffered a concussion earlier in the year and was also out for the season.[32] Harris was left as the starting goalkeeper and made her first appearance for the team on July 28, 2010, where she started in a match against Atlanta Beat.[33] She appeared in the seven remaining games of the regular season and earned the Freedom a spot in the playoffs.[29] The Freedom took on the Philadelphia Independence in the first round of the playoffs on September 19. Harris made three saves in regular time and the match was scoreless after 90 minutes. In the 120th minute, Amy Rodriguez scored for Philadelphia, resulting in a 1–0 victory and the Freedom's elimination from the playoffs.[34]

Western New York Flash, 2011[edit]

In December 2010, the Western New York Flash, previously part of the W-League, joined the WPS for the 2011 season. Shortly after, the Flash announced they had signed Harris.[35] She appeared in the team's debut in the league on April 17, 2011 against the Boston Breakers. She made eighteen appearances for the Flash in the regular season, allowing eighteen goals[33] and helping the Flash rank number one at the end of the season.[36] Harris made the start in the 2011 WPS Championship on August 27, 2011 against the Philadelphia Independence. The game was tied 1–1 after regulation and extra time, leaving the outcome of the match to be decided by penalty kicks. Both the Independence and the Flash made their first four shots. However, Harris blocked the shot by Philadelphia's Laura del Rio, clinching the championship for the Flash.[37] She was named the 2011 Coast Guard Goalkeeper of the Year following a successful 2011 season.[38]

FCR 2001 Duisburg, 2012[edit]

On January 30, 2012, it was announced that the 2012 WPS season would be suspended following legal and financial challenges.[39] Although the league was intended to resume for the 2013 season, it officially folded in May.[40] In June, Harris signed a two-year contract with FCR 2001 Duisburg in the Frauen-Bundesliga, the top professional women's league in Germany.[41] She made her first appearance for the team on October 3, 2012, where she recorded a shut out against VfL Sindelfingen. She made eight appearances for Duisburg, appearing for a total of 630 minutes.[33]

Washington Spirit, 2013[edit]

On January 11, 2013, Harris was allocated to the Washington Spirit during the 2013 NWSL Player Allocation for the inaugural season of the National Women's Soccer League.[42] On February 23, following the allocation, Harris announced that she would be leaving her previous club, FCR 2001 Duisburg, and returning home in order to play in the newly formed NWSL.[43] She started in the Spirit's first match on April 14 against the Boston Breakers.[44] In her 18 appearances for the Spirit in 2013, she made 84 saves and ended the season with a 72% save percentage.[45] The Spirit finished in last place in the league and did not advance to the playoffs.[46]

Harris (top, middle) with Tyresö FF in 2013

Tyresö FF, 2013[edit]

In July 2013, during the first NWSL season, it was announced that Harris would be joining the Swedish club Tyresö FF immediately following the NWSL regular season in late August.[47] Harris, Spirit teammate Ali Krieger, and former UNC teammate Whitney Engen all signed short term contracts with the team. They joined United States national team members Christen Press and Meghan Klingenberg, who were already with the club on long-term contracts.[48] Four days after the end of the NWSL season, Harris played her first game for Tyresö on August 21, 2013. She made seven appearances with the team in the Damallsvenskan regular season and four appearances in the UEFA Women's Champions League.[33]

In December, following the announcement that Engen, Press, and Klingenberg would be staying with Tyresö until the end of the Champions League, Harris announced that she was leaving Sweden in order to return to the Washington Spirit for the 2014 season.[49]

Washington Spirit, 2014–15[edit]

On January 3, 2014, Harris was once again allocated to the Washington Spirit for the 2014 season.[50] Harris started all 19 of her appearances for the Spirit in the 2014 season, allowing 31 goals in 1710 minutes.[51]

On July 2, the Washington Spirit faced the Boston Breakers. In the 88th minute, Spirit defender Ali Krieger was issued a yellow card.[52] Harris confronted Boston Breakers forward Jazmine Reeves and referee Dimitar N. Chavdarov stepped in to end to altercation. Harris then appeared to push Chavdarov.[53] The Professional Referee Organization reviewed the incident and found that the contact was minimal. An NWSL spokesman released the following statement regarding the incident:[54]

In reviewing the play, the referee comes in between Washington's Harris and Boston's Reeves to manage a confrontation and prevent Harris from continuing her progress towards Reeves. As the referee turns away from Harris to manage the approach of Washington's Krieger towards Reeves, Harris extends her arms to separate herself from the referee. Minimal contact with the referee is apparent from the video evidence available. Therefore, we do not feel any further action against Harris is warranted.

Harris with the Orlando Pride during a match against WNY Flash at Sahlen's Stadium on June 11, 2016.

In a match against the Chicago Red Stars on August 2,[33] Harris sustained a concussion and missed two games.[55] She was officially cleared to play on August 20 and appeared in the Spirit's semifinal game against the Seattle Reign on August 25.[33][56] The Spirit lost the match 2–1, eliminating them from the playoffs.[55]

In 2015, Harris missed almost half of the NWSL season due to commitments with the United States women's national team at the FIFA Women's World Cup in Canada.[57] She returned to the Spirit in late-July, appearing in a match against the Chicago Red Stars on July 25, which ended in a 1–1 draw.[58] Harris made nine appearances for the Spirit in the regular season, allowing 12 goals and recording a save percentage of 78%.[59]

The Spirit ended the season in fourth place, clinching a spot in the playoffs.[59] They faced Seattle Reign in the semifinals on September 13. Harris allowed three goals during the match for a 3–0 win for the Reign, eliminating the Spirit from the playoffs.[60]

Orlando Pride[edit]

On October 20, 2015, the Orlando Pride officially became the tenth team in the National Women's Soccer League.[61] Shortly after, the Washington Spirit announced that they would be leaving Harris unprotected for the 2015 Expansion Draft, giving the Orlando Pride the opportunity to select Harris for their roster for the 2016 season.[62] On November 2, the Pride selected Harris with their second pick in the 2015 Expansion Draft.[63]

Harris made her first appearance for the Pride on April 17 in a match against the Portland Thorns, losing to the Thorns 2–1.[64]

International career[edit]

Youth national teams, 2000–06[edit]

In 1999, Harris attended the United States U-14 Girl's National Team Identification Camp.[5] She represented the United States as a member of the U-16, U-17, and U-19 teams in 2000.[5]

Under-19 women's national team[edit]

Harris made 11 appearances for the U-19 team in 2001, she started nine of those matches recording four shutouts. Of the 11 appearances, two of them were international matches.[6] Harris started off 2001 with the U-19 team during a WUSA preseason exhibition match on March 25 against the Boston Breakers in Chula Vista, California. She allowed one goal during the match for a 1–0 victory for the Breakers.[65] Harris then made appearances in two matches against the Canadian U-19 national team on June 30 and July 2.[66] Harris joined the U-19 national team for an eight-day training camp in December 2001 at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in San Diego, California.[67]

Harris started off 2002 with the U-19 national team at the ARCO Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista, California in late January for a training camp.[68] In early March, Harris was a member of the roster for a two-game tour of Mexico, where she appeared in two games against Costa Rica and Mexico in Pachuca, Mexico.[69] She recorded a shutout in the 4–0 victory over Costa Rica and allowed one goal against Mexico, giving a 2–1 win to the United States. From March 17 to March 23, Harris and the U-19 team joined the San Jose CyberRays, San Diego Spirit, the United States U-21 national team, and the United States National Amateur team for the WUSA pre-season tournament.[70] Harris also appeared in the two warmup games before the CONCACAF qualifying tournament.[71][72]

On April 18, 2002, United States U-19 national team head coach Tracey Leone named Harris to the 18-player roster for the CONCACAF qualifying tournament. The tournament was held from May 7 to May 11 and served as a qualification for the inaugural FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship.[73] The round-robin tournament featured games against Surinam, Haiti, and Costa Rica. Harris started in all three matches, recording shutouts against Suriname[74] and Haiti,[75] while allowing one goal for Costa Rica.[76] The United States won their group and qualified for the U-19 Women's World Championship.[76]

Following the CONCACAF tournament, Harris joined the U-19 team on a 15-day tour of Europe in June that included matches against Germany's U-19 and U-21 teams, Sweden's U-19 team, German Bundesliga team Duisburg, and Swedish Damallsvenskan team Hammarby FC.[77] In July, Harris was named to the 27-player roster for a 13-day training camp at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in San Diego.[78] Following the training camp, Harris was subsequently named to the U-19 team that would represent the United States at the 2002 FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship in late August.[79]

At the age of 16, Harris was the youngest member on the United States team at the U-19 Women's World Championship.[5] The tournament was held in Canada from August 17 to September 1.[79] Harris started in all six matches for the United States during the tournament. In the group stage, she allowed one goal during the opening match against England on August 17.[80] She then recorded two shut outs against Australia and Chinese Taipei on August 19 and August 21, respectively.[81][82] The United States faced Denmark in the quarterfinals on August 25, where Harris once again posted a shut out.[83] She allowed one goal for Germany in the semifinals on August 29.[84] During the championship game of the tournament, the United States faced Canada. Harris posted another shut out for a 1–0 victory in overtime for the United States.[85] Harris made eight total shutouts in 15 appearances for the U-19 team in 2002.[6]

Harris trained with the U-19 national team at the ARCO U.S. Olympic Training Center in January 2003 to start off the year.[86] In February, Harris was on the roster for a two-game series with the full Mexican women's national team.[87] She then joined the team once again for a nine-day training camp at the ARCO Olympic Training Center in April. While there, the team played a match against the San Diego Spirit.[88]

Harris was briefly called up to the U-21 national team for a 13-day training camp and four-game tour of Brazil in May. Two of the games were against Brazil's U-21 team and the two others were against Santos FC and Saad FC. Harris was one of the two players on the roster that were not yet in college.[89][90] Following the training camp, Harris moved back down to the U-19 team, where she was a member of the roster for the USYS Cup in late May.[91] Harris started in goal during the first match of the tournament against Canada on May 27 in a 6–1 win.[92] After her appearance in the tournament, Harris once again joined the U-21 team. On July 9, she was named to the 18-player team that would represent the United States at the Nordic Cup in Denmark.[93] She started the team's first match against Denmark on July 21 and recorded a shut out for a 1–0 victory for the United States.[94] She also appeared in the final game of the tournament on July 27 against Sweden. She allowed one goal during the match and the United States won 2–1, taking the Nordic Cup.[95]

In October 2003, Harris joined the U-19 women's national team for a training camp at the Home Depot Center in Carson, California. The team also played matches against local club teams during the training camp.[96] The team gathered one last time for the year for a training camp from December 27 to January 2 at the U.S. Soccer's National Training Center at The Home Depot Center in Carson, California. Harris was on the 26-player roster for the training camp.[97] Shortly after, Harris joined the team for another training camp from January 23 to February first at The Home Depot Center.[98]

Harris was named to the 18-player roster for a two-game series against the full Mexican women's national team on February 18 and February 20. Having 23 caps with the U-19 team at that point, Harris was the most experienced player on the roster.[99]

Harris was a member of the U-19 national team that played in the Philips Lighting U-19 Women's Soccer Invitational, their first major domestic tournament, from April 6 to April 10.[100] In the first match of the tournament against Holland on April 6, Harris recorded a shut out for a 2–0 for the United States.[101] She made her second appearance in the tournament during the team's final match against China on April 10. She recorded another shutout for a 4–0 win, giving the United States a second-place finish in the invitational.[102]

On April 28, Harris was named to the 18-player roster that would represent the United States at the CONCACAF U-19 Women's Qualifying Tournament held in Ottawa and Montreal, Canada. Harris was one of four members of the team that were also on the team that won the inaugural FIFA U-19 World Championship in 2002. She was also the most capped U-19 player on the roster.[103] Harris recorded a shut out against Dominican Republic on May 28 for a 14–0 win.[104] She then started in goal against Trinidad & Tobago on May 30. The lone goal for Trinidad & Tobago came during the 86th minute, after Kelsey Davis came on for Harris in the 62nd minute. The United States won the match 11–1, guaranteeing their spot in the semifinals.[105] Harris recorded her second shut out of the tournament on June 1 during the team's final group match against Costa Rica, which ended in a 0–0 draw.[106] In the semifinal match against Mexico on June 4, Harris recorded another shut out. The 6–0 win secured the United States U-19 women's national team a place in the 2004 FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship, although they still had one more match in the tournament.[107] Harris started in the final against Canada on June 6. She made seven saves during the game and allowed two goals. Canada won the match in overtime.[108]

Harris trained with the U-19 national team during their first training camp following the CONCACAF Qualifying Tournament. The training took place in from July 7 to July 18 in New Jersey.[109] Leading up to the FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship held in November, Harris joined the U-19 team for another training at the U.S. Soccer's National Training Center at The Home Depot Center in Carson, California in late August.[110]

Harris delayed her enrollment at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in order to train with the U-19 team leading up to the U-19 World Championship in a modified residency program. In the two months leading up to the championship, the team trained together in two-week blocks until they left for the tournament in November.[12][111]

On October 12, Harris was named to the 21-player roster that would represent the United States at the 2004 FIFA Women's World Championship in Thailand.[112] Harris was captain of the team and played every minute in all six matches of the tournament for the United States.[113][114] Harris started in net in the opening group match against South Korea on November 11 and recorded a shut out for a 3–0 win.[115] She allowed one goal during the match against Russia on November 14 in a 4–1 win for the United States.[116] She recorded her second shut out of the tournament on November 18 against Spain in the team's final group match. The United States won 1–0 and was the only team to win all three of its group matches.[117] In the quarterfinals, Harris posted her third shut out in the 2–0 win over Australia on November 21.[118] The United States moved into the semifinals, where they faced Germany on November 24. Harris started in the net and allowed three goals during the match. The Germans took the win and halted the United States' advancement in the tournament.[119] The United States faced Brazil in the third place match, where Harris played all 90 minutes. She made eight saves and recorded her fourth shut out of the tournament. The United States won the game 3–0 and took away third place.[113] Harris was subsequently named to the Tournament All-Star Team by the FIFA Technical Study Group.[120] She was also a 2004 Chevrolet Athlete of the Year Award Finalist.[121]

Harris finished her U-19 career with 39 caps, the most of any United States player. She finished with an all-time U-19 international record of 28–5–2.[113]

Under-21 women's national team[edit]

Harris was called up to a U-21 national team training camp held from March 26 to April 3 at the U.S. Soccer National Team Training Center in Carson California.[122] Harris then sustained an ACL injury in the summer of 2005, which kept her off the field until 2006.[6] She returned to the U-21 national team in 2006 for a training camp from June 11 to June 17 in Maryland.[123] It was during this training camp that Harris sustained her second ACL injury, this time to her left knee.[6][12]

Senior national team, 2009–present[edit]

Harris received her first call-up to the senior national team for a 12-day training camp held from September 21 to October 2, 2009.[124] It was her first national team training camp since June 2006, when she trained with the U-21 before tearing her ACL.[12] Of her first few days at camp, Harris stated:[12]

I was very nervous at the beginning. I was very stiff, to say the least. But you know what? This is an opportunity of a lifetime and I feel I'm playing well, and all I can ask for is to walk out of here knowing that I did what I was supposed to do. As far as what happens next, it's out of my control. I am just going to keep doing what I have been doing, training hard, and improving every day.

On September 7, 2010, United States women's national team head coach Pia Sundhage named a 30-player roster for two matches against China in October. The roster would then be narrowed down to the 20-player roster for the 2010 CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifying tournament. The players would take part in a training camp before the two matches starting on September 20.[125] Although Harris was not one of the four goalkeepers on this preliminary roster, she was called into camp on September 23 to replace Hope Solo, who was recovering from a shoulder surgery.[126] She was then named to the 24-player roster for the team's second match against China on October 6 in Philadelphia,[127] although she did not dress for the match.[128] She was not named to the 20-player roster for the 2010 CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifying tournament, but she did travel with the team to train.[129]

Harris was named to a 24-player preliminary roster for a two-game series in November 2010.[130] Harris was then called into a six-day training camp in January 2011 in Carson, California leading up to the 2011 Four Nations Tournament.[131] Because Solo was still out with a shoulder injury and Jill Loyden was out with a broken hand, Harris was named to the roster for the tournament to back-up Nicole Barnhart.[132]

Harris joined the national team for another training camp in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida from February 3 to February 9.[133] Following the camp, she was named to the 24-player roster for the 2011 Algarve Cup.[134] She was subsequently named to the roster of 20 players that suited up for the games, although she did not make an appearance.[135] She was on the roster for a match against England on April 2 in East London.[136] In late April, Harris trained with the national team for three weeks in final preparations for the 2011 Women's World Cup.[137] Although she did not make the final roster for the World Cup, she joined the team following the tournament in November for a two-week training camp in Arizona.[138] She also trained with the team in December[139] and January.[140] Following the 2012 CONCACAF Olympic Qualifying Tournament, Harris joined a 28-player roster for a training camp in Frisco, Texas in the week leading up to a match against New Zealand on February 11, although she did not suit up for the game.[141]

On February 17, Harris was named to a 23-player roster for the 2012 Algarve Cup.[142] While in Portugal, Harris played in a closed-door training match against China on February 25, splitting halves with Nicole Barnhart.[143] Harris was not named to the roster of 21 players that suited up for the games in the tournament.[144] Harris traveled with the national team in early April to compete at the Women's Kirin Challenge Cup in Japan.[145] Following the tournament, she trained with the national team in Florida from April 18 to April 30.[146] During the training camp, Harris injured her left shoulder, sustaining a small tear in her labrum.[147] She still went on to train with the national team in New Jersey from May 10 to May 25.[148] However, in early June, she decided to undergo surgery to repair the tear in order to prevent further damage. The surgery kept her off the pitch for the rest of 2012.[147]

Harris with the United States women's national soccer team in June 2014

In January 2013, Harris was called up to a 29-player training camp leading up to two matches in early February. This was her first time back with the national team following her shoulder surgery the previous June.[149] Following the training camp and matches, Harris was named to the 23-player roster for the 2013 Algarve Cup in Portugal. The team's starting goalkeeper Hope Solo was out with a wrist injury, giving Harris the opportunity to make an appearance in the tournament.[150] She was the only uncapped player on the roster.[151]

On March 11, 2013, Harris earned her first appearance with the senior team in a match against Sweden. Harris played all 90 minutes of the match and allowed one goal for a 1–1 draw.[152] Following the match, head coach Tom Sermanni stated the following regarding Harris' performance:[153]

I think she did well for her first cap. It was a really high pressure game and especially when you lose a goal early on that she had absolutely no chance with. She was put in a few difficult situations during the game and I think she handled them extremely well.

Harris stated that she had "waited a long time for [that] moment" and although she was nervous, she was happy with her performance.[153]

Harris traveled to Europe with the national team for matches against Germany and the Netherlands in early April.[154] Harris made her second appearance for the national team on April 9 against the Netherlands. She allowed one goal during the match for a 3–1 win for the United States.[155] In late May, Harris was named to the 21-player roster that traveled to Canada to train before facing Canada on June 2.[156] She did not suit up for the match.[157]

On December 3, Harris underwent arthroscopic surgery to repair a torn lateral meniscus in her left knee. The injury had affected her play since June and kept her out for a month following the surgery.[158]

Harris returned to the national team in 2014 for a training camp from January 8 to January 15 at U.S. Soccer's National Training Center in Carson, California.[159] Harris was not named to the roster for the 2014 Algarve Cup.[160] In late April, Harris was named to a 22-player roster for a match against Canada on May 8,[161] although she did not dress for the game.[162] She was on the roster for two games in June against France.[163] On June 19, 2014, Harris made her third appearance for the national team in their second game against France in East Hartford, Connecticut. She started and played all 90 minutes, allowing two goals for a 2–2 draw.[164]

Harris was named to a 19-player roster for a match against Switzerland on August 20 in Sandy, Utah.[165] Shortly after, she was replaced on the roster by Alyssa Naeher after she suffered a concussion with the Washington Spirit.[166] She returned to the national team for a training camp at the end of August in order to prepare for two matches against Mexico in September as well as the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship in October.[167] She dressed for both games against Mexico[168][169] and was subsequently named to the roster for the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship that served as a qualification for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. This was the first CONCACAF qualifying roster that Harris made at the senior level.[170] She made her fourth appearance for the national team in team's final group match against Haiti on October 20, 2014 in Washington, D.C. She played all 90 minutes and recorded her first career shut out in a 6–0 win for the United States.[171] The United States went on to win the tournament after a 6–0 win over Costa Rica.[172]

Harris with the United States women's national soccer team before a match against England in 2015

Harris was named to the 24-player roster for the International Tournament of Brasilia in Brazil from December 10 to December 21.[173] While in Brazil, Harris sustained a broken pinky finger and underwent surgery in order to repair it.[174] She recovered in time to fully participate in a 21-day training camp in 2015 from January 5 to January 25 at the U.S. Soccer National Training Center in Carson, California.[174][175]

Harris traveled with the team on a 13-day trip to Europe for matches against France and England in mid-February. United States starting goalkeeper Hope Solo was out on suspension during the matches, giving Harris the opportunity to make an appearance.[176] Harris made her fifth appearance for the national team in the match against France on February 8. The United States lost the match 2–0.[177] She also played all 90 minutes in the match against England on February 13, recording a shut out in the 1–0 win and earning her sixth cap.[178]

On February 21, Harris was named to a 25-player roster for the 2015 Algarve Cup in Portugal.[179] She was then named to a 25-player roster on March 20 for a match against New Zealand on April 4 in St. Louis.[180] She was subsequently named as one of the 18 players that would suit up for the match, although she did not make an appearance.[181]

On April 14, 2015, Harris was named to the 23-player roster that would represent the United States at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. She was one of eight members of the team that were making their first World Cup roster.[182] Harris became a World Cup Champion on July 5, when the United States defeated Japan 5–2 in the Women's World Cup final.[183] Harris joined the national team on a Victory Tour following their World Cup win that started in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on August 16 and ended in New Orleans, Louisiana on December 16.[184][185] Harris made a start during the first match of the Victory Tour against Costa Rica in an 8–0 win.[186] She also made an appearance in the match against Haiti on September 17, coming in for Solo in the second half. The United States won the mach 5–0.[187]

Harris was named to the 26-player roster for the national team's first training camp in 2016. The camp led into a match against Ireland on January 23.[188] Harris suited up for the match but did not make an appearance.[189] Harris was subsequently named to the 20-player roster for 2016 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying.[190] The United States qualified to the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro after a semifinal win against Trinidad & Tobago on February 19.[191] The United States went on to win the tournament after defeating Canada 2–0.[192]

Harris was named to the roster for the 2016 SheBelieves Cup that took place from March 3 to March 9.[193] She then joined a 23-player roster for a training camp ahead of two matches against Colombia in early April.[194] She did not dress for either match.[195][196] Harris was on the roster for another two-game series against Japan,[197] although she did not suit up for the games.[198][199]

On July 12, 2016, Harris was named an alternate for the 2016 Olympic Games.[200]

International Appearances[edit]

# Date Location Opponent Result Score Competition
1 March 11, 2013[152] Lagos, Portugal SwedenSweden D 1–1 2013 Algarve Cup
2 April 9, 2013[155] The Hague, Netherlands NetherlandsNetherlands W 3–1 Friendly
3 June 19, 2014[164] East Hartford, Connecticut FranceFrance D 2–2 Friendly
4 October 20, 2014[171] Washington, D.C. HaitiHaiti W 6–0 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship
5 February 8, 2015[177] Lorient, France FranceFrance L 2–0 Friendly
6 February 13, 2015[178] Milton Keynes, England EnglandEngland W 1–0 Friendly
7 August 16, 2015[186] Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Costa RicaCosta Rica W 8–0 Friendly
8 September 17, 2015[187] Detroit, Michigan HaitiHaiti W 5–0 Friendly
9 September 15, 2016 Columbus, Ohio ThailandThailand W 9–0 Friendly
10 October 23, 2016 Minneapolis, Minnesota SwitzerlandSwitzerland W 5–1 Friendly
11 November 10, 2016 San Jose, California RomaniaRomania W 8–1 Friendly

Honors and Awards[edit]

High School[edit]

  • Class 3A State Championship: 2002, 2003

College[edit]

  • NCAA Women's Soccer Championship: 2006, 2008, 2009

Club[edit]

International[edit]

  • CONCACAF Women's U-19 Qualifying Tournament: 2002
  • FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship: 2002
  • CONCACAF Women's Championship: 2014
  • CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Championship: 2016
  • FIFA Women's World Cup: 2015
  • Algarve Cup: 2011, 2013, 2015

Individual[edit]

In popular culture[edit]

Video games[edit]

Harris was featured along with her national teammates in the EA Sports' FIFA video game series in FIFA 16, the first time women players were included in the game.[201]

Ticker Tape Parade and White House Honor[edit]

Following the United States' win at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, Harris and her teammates became the first women's sports team to be honored with a Ticker Tape Parade in New York City.[202] Each player received a key to the city from Mayor Bill de Blasio.[203] In October of the same year, the team was honored by President Barack Obama at the White House.[204]

Personal life[edit]

Harris lives in Orlando, Florida. She has done philanthropic work for To Write Love on Her Arms.[citation needed]

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