Asia Pacific Theological Seminary

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Asia Pacific Theological Seminary
Asia Pacific Theological Seminary logo.jpg
Former name
Far East Advanced School of Theology
Established1964
PresidentYee Tham Wan
Address
444 Ambuklao Rd.
, ,
16°25′N 120°37′E / 16.42°N 120.62°E / 16.42; 120.62Coordinates: 16°25′N 120°37′E / 16.42°N 120.62°E / 16.42; 120.62
Websitewww.apts.edu

Asia Pacific Theological Seminary (APTS) is a theological seminary in Baguio City, the Philippines, operated by the Assemblies of God.[1]

The seminary was founded in 1964 as the Far East Advanced School of Theology (FEAST). It moved to its current location in 1986 and was given its present name in 1989.[2]

The seminary is accredited by the Asia Theological Association (ATA) to offer the following degrees:[3]

APTS is also part of Asia Graduate School of Theology, a consortium of evangelical theological seminaries established by the ATA in 1984 to enable member seminaries to offer higher degrees.[7]

According to Wonsuk and Julie Ma, APTS is a "well-respected institution, not only among Evangelicals, but also mainline churches".[8]

In conjunction with the Asian Pentecostal Society, APTS publishes the Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Donohue, Katherine (2015). "The View from Seminary: Using Library Holdings to Measure Christian Seminary Worldviews". The Changing World Religion Map: Sacred Places, Identities, Practices and Politics. Springer. p. 1074. ISBN 9789401793766. Retrieved 14 November 2015.
  2. ^ "General Introduction". Asia Pacific Theological Seminary. Retrieved 14 November 2015.
  3. ^ "Asia Pacific Theological Seminary". Asia Theological Association. Retrieved 14 November 2015.
  4. ^ "Master of Arts Degree Program". Asia Pacific Theological Seminary. Retrieved 16 November 2015.
  5. ^ "Master of Divinity Program". Asia Pacific Theological Seminary. Retrieved 16 November 2015.
  6. ^ "Post-Graduate Programs". Asia Pacific Theological Seminary. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  7. ^ Ro, Bong Rin (2008). "A History of Evangelical Theological Education in Asia (ATA): 1970–1990" (PDF). Torch Trinity Journal. 11 (1): 39. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  8. ^ Ma, Wonsuk; Ma, Julie C. (2012). "The Making of Korean Pentecostal Missionaries: Our Personal Journey". Together in One Mission: Pentecostal Cooperation in World Evangelization. Pathway Press. p. 173. ISBN 9781596847316. Retrieved 14 November 2015.

External links[edit]