Ask Any Girl (film)

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Ask Any Girl
Ask any girl poster.jpg
Theatrical poster
Directed by Charles Walters
Produced by Joe Pasternak
Written by George Wells
Winifred Wolfe (novel)
Starring David Niven
Shirley MacLaine
Gig Young
Music by Jeff Alexander
Cinematography Robert J. Bronner
Edited by John McSweeney Jr.
Production
company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Euterpe, Inc.
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date
  • May 21, 1959 (1959-05-21)
Running time
500 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $1,140,000[1]
Box office $3,475,000[1]

Ask Any Girl is a 1959 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer romantic comedy film starring David Niven, Shirley MacLaine and Gig Young.[2]

Plot[edit]

A wide-eyed Meg Wheeler comes to New York City and takes a job in market research for a large firm. She's also keeping an eye open to meet the right man, her research making her aware that the United States has five million more females than males.

Upon meeting two clients, the reserved and somewhat stodgy Miles Doughton and his playboy younger brother Evan, it doesn't take long for Meg to realize she's romantically interested in Evan.

Miles is willing to help. He has seen so many of his brother's conquests come and go that he knows what Evan likes in a girl. Therefore, in a Pygmalion-like way, he sets out to transform Meg into exactly that kind of girl. What she doesn't know is that Miles secretly comes to want her for himself.

Cast[edit]

Reception[edit]

According to MGM records, the film earned $2,075,000 in the US and Canada and $1,400,000 elsewhere, turning a profit for the studio of $505,000.[1]

It recorded admissions of 255,797 in France.[3]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Shirley Maclaine won the 1959 BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actress, and also the Silver Bear for Best Actress at the 9th Berlin International Film Festival.[4] She was also nominated for a Golden Globe, losing out to Marilyn Monroe in Some Like It Hot.

Rod Taylor's performance was much admired and helped lead to his casting in The Time Machine (1960).[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The Eddie Mannix Ledger, Los Angeles: Margaret Herrick Library, Center for Motion Picture Study .
  2. ^ Bosley Crowther (May 22, 1959). "NY Times review". New York Times. Retrieved 22 November 2008. 
  3. ^ French box office admissions for 1960 at Box Office Story.
  4. ^ "Berlinale 1959: Prize Winners". berlinale.de. Retrieved 2010-01-05. 
  5. ^ Stephen Vagg, Rod Taylor: An Aussie in Hollywood, Bear Manor Media 2010 p61

External links[edit]