Asquith family

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H. H. Asquith

The Asquiths were originally a middle-class family from the West Riding of Yorkshire, members of the Congregational church, whose family name derived from the village of Askwith. The first prominent member of the family was H. H. Asquith, who was prime minister from 1908 to 1916. In 1925, Asquith was raised to the peerage as Earl of Oxford and Asquith. His great-grandson Raymond is the present Earl.

All of H. H. Asquith's seven children achieved some prominence in national affairs. By his first wife Helen Kelsall Melland (d. 1891), he had four sons and one daughter. All of the sons volunteered for the Front early in the war. The eldest son, Raymond, a barrister and poet, was killed in action in 1916. The second son, Herbert, was a poet who married Lady Cynthia Charteris, a writer and anthologist. The third son, Arthur, became a Brigadier. The fourth son, Cyril (1890–1954), became a Law Lord. The daughter, Violet (1887–1969), became a Liberal politician and a Life Peeress in her own right in 1964.

By his second wife, the former Margot Tennant, Asquith had two more children. His daughter Elizabeth (1897–1945) was a writer who married a Romanian prince, becoming Princess Antoine Bibesco. His youngest son Anthony (1902–1968) became a well-known film director.

Prominent members[edit]

Living descendants are omitted, unless they are notable and/or have a separate Wikipedia entry.

Violet Bonham-Carter, Baroness Asquith of Yarnbury.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ World War One Battlefields – Guillemont.
  2. ^ Obituaries — The Earl of Oxford and Asquith. The Daily Telegraph. 2011-01-17. Retrieved 2011-02-02.
  3. ^ pollock.4mg.com
  4. ^ Descendants of Sir Frederick Pollock last updated 8 December 2001. Retrieved 28 February 2008.
  5. ^ Leo van der Pas. "Descendants of Sir John Cavendish: (gen 17+18 of 20 generations) Archived September 6, 2004, at Archive.is. Retrieved 28 February 2008.
  6. ^ www.geneall.net
  7. ^ a b Ibid.
  8. ^ http://www.geneall.net/U/per_page.php?id=98705
  9. ^ Frances Rose Asquith. Retrieved 28 February 2008.