Association for Public Art

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Association for Public Art (formerly Fairmount Park Art Association)
FPAA medalion.JPG
Abbreviation aPA
Formation 1872 [1]
Purpose Commission, preserve, promote, and interpret public art in Philadelphia
Headquarters 1528 Walnut Street, Suite 1000
Philadelphia, PA 19102
Region served
City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Executive Director and Chief Curator
Penny Balkin Bach[2]
Website http://www.associationforpublicart.org/

Established in 1872 in Philadelphia, the Association for Public Art (formerly Fairmount Park Art Association) is the United State's first private, nonprofit public art organization dedicated to integrating public art and urban planning.[3] The Association for Public Art (aPA) commissions, preserves, promotes and interprets public art in Philadelphia,[4] and it is largely due to the work of the aPA that Philadelphia has one of the largest public art collections in the country.[5] The aPA has acquired and commissioned works by many famous sculptors (including Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Alexander Stirling Calder, Daniel Chester French, Frederic Remington, Paul Manship, and Albert Laessle);[6] supported city planning projects; established an outdoor sculpture conservation program; and sponsored numerous publications, exhibitions, and educational programs.[7] The aPA interprets and preserves more than 200 works of art throughout Philadelphia[8] – working closely with the City's Public Art Office, Fairmount Park, and other organizations and agencies responsible for placing and caring for outdoor sculpture in Philadelphia[9] – and maintains an inventory of all of the city's public art.[10]

History[edit]

Hudson Bay Wolves by Edward Kemeys

Chartered by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1872, the Fairmount Park Art Association (now the Association for Public Art) was founded by a group of concerned citizens in the late nineteenth century who wanted to beautify Philadelphia's urban landscape with public art to counter the city's encroaching industrialism. The Association initially focused on enhancing Fairmount Park with outdoor sculpture, but the organization's mission expanded in 1906 to include the rest of the city as a whole: to "promote and foster the beautiful in Philadelphia, in its architecture, improvements, and the city plan."[11] Friends Charles H. Howell and Henry K. Fox conceived of the Fairmount Park Art Association, and the organization's first president was Anthony J. Drexel, founder of Drexel University.[6] The Association's first official venture was purchasing Hudson Bay Wolves Quarreling Over the Carcass of a Deer (1872) by Edward Kemeys,[12] and its first major undertaking was commissioning Alexander Milne Calder for an equestrian statue of Major General George Meade in 1873.[13]

Name Change[edit]

In May 2012, the Fairmount Park Art Association changed its name to the Association for Public Art (aPA). The change was made to more clearly communicate the nature and scope of the organization's work, and to distinguish itself from other local and national public art agencies[14] The organization's first major project under its new name was Open Air (2012), a world-premiere interactive light installation for the Benjamin Franklin Parkway by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer.[15]

Public Artworks (Overview)[edit]

The Spirit of Enterprise (1950-1960) by Jacques Lipchitz
Cowboy (1908) by Frederic Remington
  • Winter Fountains for the Parkway (December 2017), Jennifer Steinkamp, commissioned by Philadelphia's Parkway Council with the Association for Public Art [16]
  • Cai Guo-Qiang: Fireflies (September 2017), Cai Guo-Qiang, commissioned by the Association for Public Art with Fung Collaboratives [17]
  • Big Bling (2016; installed 2017), Martin Puryear, presented by the Association for Public Art, commissioned by Madison Square Park Conservancy [18]
  • AMOR (1998; installed 2015), Robert Indiana, presented by the Association for Public Art and the Philadelphia Museum of Art [19]
  • Magic Carpet (2014), Candy Coated (formerly Candy Depew), commissioned by the Association for Public Art [20]
  • Symbiosis (2011; installed 2014), Roxy Paine, acquired through a grant from the Daniel W. Dietrich II Trust, Inc.[21]
  • OPEN AIR (2012), Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [4]
  • Rock Form (Porthcurno) (1964; installed 2012), Barbara Hepworth, gift of David N. Pincus to the Association for Public Art, commissioned by the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority [22]
  • The Labor Monument: Philadelphia’s Tribute to the American Worker (2010), John Kindness, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [23]
  • Common Ground (2009), John Stone and Lonnie Graham in collaboration with Lorene Cary for Project H.O.M.E., commissioned by the Association for Public Art [24]
  • Iroquois (1983-1999; installed 2007), Mark di Suvero, acquired by the Association for Public Art, gift of David N. Pincus [25]
  • Manayunk Stoops: Heart and Home (2006), Diane Pieri, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [26]
  • Embodying Thoreau: Dwelling, Sitting, Watching (2003), Ed Levine, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [27]
  • I have a story to tell you…(2003), Pepón Osorio, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [28]
  • Pavilion in the Trees (1993), Martin Puryear, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [29]
  • Sleeping Woman (1991), Tom Chimes and Stephen Berg, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [30]
  • Fingerspan (1987), Jody Pinto, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [31]
  • Bolt of Lightning...A Memorial to Benjamin Franklin (conceived 1933; installed 1984), Isamu Noguchi, commissioned by the Association for Public Art
  • Louis Kahn Lecture Room (1982), Siah Armajani, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [32]
  • El Gran Teatro de la Luna (1982), Rafael Ferrer, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [33]
  • Atmosphere and Environment XII (1970), Louise Nevelson, purchased by the Association for Public Art [34]
  • The Wedges (1970), Robert Morris, acquired by the Association for Public Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. H. Gates Lloyd [35]
  • Three Way Piece Number 1: Points (1964), Henry Moore, purchased by the Association for Public Art [36]
  • Bear and Cub (1957), Joseph J. Greenberg, Jr., commissioned by the Association for Public Art [37]
  • The Spirit of Enterprise (1950-1960), Jacques Lipchitz, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [38]
  • Aero Memorial (1948), Paul Manship, commissioned by the Association for Public Art and Aero Club of Pennsylvania [39]
  • The Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial (1933-1961), various artists, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [40]
  • The Mounted Amazon Attacked by a Panther (1839, cast 1929), August Kiss, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [41]
  • Shakespeare Memorial (1926), Alexander Stirling Calder, commissioned by the Association for Public Art, City of Philadelphia, and the Shakespeare Memorial Committee [42]
  • Thorfinn Karlsefni (1918), Einar Jónsson, commissioned by the Association for Public Art and J. Bunford Samuel [43]
  • Billy (1914), Albert Laessle, gift of Eli Kirke Price II to the Association for Public Art [44]
  • Duck Girl (1911), Paul Manship, purchased by the Association for Public Art [45]
  • Cowboy (1908), Frederic Remington, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [46]
  • The Medicine Man (1899), Cyrus E. Dallin, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [47]
  • General Ulysses S. Grant (1897), Daniel Chester French and Edward C. Potter, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [48]
  • James A. Garfield Monument (1895), Augustus Saint-Gaudens, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [49]
  • The Lion Fighter (1858, cast 1892), Albert Wolff, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [50]
  • Lion Crushing a Serpent (1832, cast 1891), Antoine-Louis Barye, purchased by the Association for Public Art [51]
  • Dickens and Little Nell (1890), Frank Edwin Elwell, purchased by the Association for Public Art [52]
  • Stone Age in America (1887) by John J. Boyle, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [53]
  • Major General George Gordon Meade (1887), Alexander Milne Calder, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [54]
  • The Dying Lioness (1873), Wilhelm Franz Alexander Friedrich Wolff, commissioned by the Association for Public Art [55]
  • Night (1872), Edward Stauch, purchased by the Association for Public Art [56]

Publications[edit]

  • New Land Marks: public art, community, and the meaning of place, 2001
  • Public Art in Philadelphia, 1992
  • Form and Function: Proposals for Public Art for Philadelphia, 1982
  • Sculpture of a City: Philadelphia’s Treasures in Bronze and Stone, 1974

Awards and recognition[edit]

Lion Crushing a Serpent (1832) by Antoine Louis Barye

See also[edit]

Atmosphere and Environment XII (1970) by Louise Nevelson
General Ulysses S. Grant (1897) by Daniel Chester French and Edward C. Potter

References[edit]

  1. ^ Webster, Richard (1981). Philadelphia Preserved. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 226. ISBN 0-87722-215-0. 
  2. ^ "Board and Staff". aPA official web site. 2013-01-14. Retrieved 2013-01-14. 
  3. ^ "aPA Name Change Press Release" (PDF). Canary Promotion + Design. Retrieved 2013-01-14. 
  4. ^ a b "Open Air Press Release" (PDF). Canary Promotion + Design. Retrieved 2013-01-14. 
  5. ^ a b http://travel.usatoday.com/destinations/10great/story/2011-10-27/10-great-places-to-see-art-enhance-nature/50966144/1
  6. ^ a b White, Theo B. (1975). Fairmount: Philadelphia's Park. Philadelphia, PA: The Art Alliance Press. p. 94. ISBN 0879820152. 
  7. ^ Bach, Penny (2001). New Land Marks: public art, community, and the meaning of place. Washington, DC: Grayson Publishing. p. 7. ISBN 0-9679143-4-5. 
  8. ^ http://fredericksburg.com/News/FLS/2010/122010/12052010/589034
  9. ^ "MWW Launch Press Release" (PDF). Canary Promotion + Design. Retrieved 2013-01-17. 
  10. ^ Institutional Networks Serving Artists
  11. ^ Bach, Penny (2001). New Land Marks: public art, community, and the meaning of place. Washington, DC: Grayson Publishing. p. 13. ISBN 0-9679143-4-5. 
  12. ^ Fairmount Park Art Association (1974). Sculpture of a City. New York, NY: Walker Publishing Co., Inc. p. 54. ISBN 978-0-8027-0459-7. 
  13. ^ Fairmount Park Art Association (1974). Sculpture of a City. New York, NY: Walker Publishing Co., Inc. p. 119. ISBN 978-0-8027-0459-7. 
  14. ^ http://associationforpublicart.org/name-change/
  15. ^ http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/the-feed/item/38159-name-change-for-fairmount-park-art-association
  16. ^ "Announcing Jennifer Steinkamp's "Winter Fountains" for Parkway 100 - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-04-13. 
  17. ^ "Coming to the Parkway in September - Cai Guo-Qiang: Fireflies - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-04-13. 
  18. ^ "Big Bling - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  19. ^ "AMOR - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  20. ^ http://associationforpublicart.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/The_Oval_Magic_Carpet_Press_Release_6_2014.pdf
  21. ^ http://www.canarypromo.com/roxypaine
  22. ^ http://associationforpublicart.org/interactive-art-map/rock-form
  23. ^ "Labor Monument Press Release" (PDF). Association for Public Art. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-09-14. Retrieved 2013-01-14. 
  24. ^ "Common Ground Press Release" (PDF). Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2013-01-14. 
  25. ^ http://articles.philly.com/2007-01-11/news/25220348_1_sculpture-iroquois-parkway-site
  26. ^ "Manayunk Stoops Press Release" (PDF). Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2013-01-14. 
  27. ^ "Embodying Thoreau Press Release" (PDF). Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2013-01-14. 
  28. ^ "I have a story to tell you Press Release" (PDF). Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2013-01-14. 
  29. ^ "Pavilion in the Trees Press Release" (PDF). Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2013-01-14. 
  30. ^ Bach, Penny (1992). Public Art in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 259. ISBN 0-87722-822-1. 
  31. ^ Bach, Penny (1992). Public Art in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 256. ISBN 0-87722-822-1. 
  32. ^ http://www.fleisher.org/about/kahn-room.php
  33. ^ "El Gran Teatro de la Luna - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  34. ^ Bach, Penny (1992). Public Art in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 236. ISBN 0-87722-822-1. 
  35. ^ Bach, Penny (1992). Public Art in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 237. ISBN 0-87722-822-1. 
  36. ^ http://associationforpublicart.org/interactive-art-map/three-way-piece-number-1-points
  37. ^ "Bear and Cub - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  38. ^ Bach, Penny (1992). Public Art in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 223. ISBN 0-87722-822-1. 
  39. ^ Bach, Penny (1992). Public Art in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 229. ISBN 0-87722-822-1. 
  40. ^ George and Penn, Alice L. and Elan (2006). Philadelphia: A Pictorial Celebration. New York, NY: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc. p. 116. ISBN 978-1-4027-2384-1. 
  41. ^ "The Mounted Amazon Attacked by a Panther - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  42. ^ Bach, Penny (1992). Public Art in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 217. ISBN 0-87722-822-1. 
  43. ^ "Thorfinn Karlsefni - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  44. ^ "Billy - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  45. ^ "Duck Girl - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  46. ^ Bach, Penny (1992). Public Art in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 212. ISBN 0-87722-822-1. 
  47. ^ "The Medicine Man - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  48. ^ Bach, Penny (1992). Public Art in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 208. ISBN 0-87722-822-1. 
  49. ^ Bach, Penny (1992). Public Art in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 207. ISBN 0-87722-822-1. 
  50. ^ "The Lion Fighter - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  51. ^ "Lion Crushing a Serpent - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  52. ^ "Philadelphia Public Art: Dickens and Little Nell". Philart.net. Retrieved 2014-05-13. 
  53. ^ Bach, Penny (1992). Public Art in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 206. ISBN 0-87722-822-1. 
  54. ^ "Major General George Gordon Meade - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  55. ^ "The Dying Lioness - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  56. ^ "Night - Association for Public Art". Association for Public Art. Retrieved 2017-06-22. 
  57. ^ "Association for Public Art to Receive Public Art Network Award on June 12". Americans for the Arts. Retrieved 2016-06-15. 
  58. ^ http://www.phillymag.com/best-of-philly/symbiosis/
  59. ^ http://www.temple.edu/tyler/news/2013-tyler-tribute-award.html
  60. ^ http://publicartdialogue.org/award
  61. ^ http://aaslh.org/documents/RichmondBanquetProgram4web.pdf
  62. ^ http://www.artsandbusinessphila.org/awards/awardhonorees2011.asp
  63. ^ http://associationforpublicart.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Year_in_Review_2004_Press_Release_7-15-2004.pdf
  64. ^ a b http://associationforpublicart.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/130th_Anniversary_Press_Release_5-6-2002.pdf
  65. ^ http://www.heritagepreservation.org/news/aic_hp.htm
  66. ^ http://associationforpublicart.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/AIC_Heritage_Award_Press_Release_10-31-2000.pdf
  67. ^ http://associationforpublicart.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/SOS_Press_Release_11-11-1999.pdf

External links[edit]