Association management company

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

An association management company (AMC) provides management and specialized administrative services to trade associations and professional associations using a for-profit approach that runs not-for-profit associations like businesses.[1] Many AMCs serve as an organization's headquarters, managing day-to-day operations and becoming the public face of the organization.[2]

Outsourced services may include executive, administrative and financial management; strategic planning; membership development; public affairs and lobbying; education and professional development; statistical research; meetings management; and marketing and communication services.[3] Orienting board members is high on the list of tasks undertaken; AMCs educate new nonprofit board members on their roles, laying out expectations for fiduciary oversight, and pointing out the pitfalls of conflicts of interest.[4]

The association management company industry is more than 130 years old having been founded by Fernley & Fernley, Inc., based in Philadelphia. There are now more than 600 AMCs worldwide collectively managing associations ranging in budget size from $50,000 to $16 million and representing more than 3 million members.[5] Many nonprofit groups are not aware that such management companies exist, but they can be found in most major cities.[6]

Current employees of AMCs are eligible to apply to become a Certified Association Executive.[7]

The Alexandria, Va.-based AMC Institute accredits AMCs under the guidance of the American National Standards Institute.[8]

Fernley & Fernley is recognized as Founders of the industry and is the senior most AMC in the United States, having been established in Philadelphia in 1886.[9] Chicago-based SmithBucklin is the world's largest AMC,[10] although Geneva, Switzerland-based MCI Group, a professional conference organiser that offers AMC services, has more employees: 1,900 as of 2016.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Thomas, Willis (2013). The Basics of Achieving Professional Certification: Enhancing Your Credentials. CRC Press. p. 78. ISBN 9781466554566. 
  2. ^ "What is the AMC model? - AMC Institute (AMCI)". www.amcinstitute.org. Retrieved 2016-05-22. 
  3. ^ "What is the AMC model? - AMC Institute (AMCI)". www.amcinstitute.org. Retrieved 2016-05-22. 
  4. ^ Dubey, Anikesh (2009). Association Management: A Distinct Field of Management. India: Global India Publications. pp. Page143. ISBN 9789380228587. 
  5. ^ Duckworth, Holly (2014). Ctrl+Alt+Believe: Reboot Your Association For Success. Balboa Press. p. 78. ISBN 978-1-50432-525-7. 
  6. ^ Cox, John B. (2015). ASAE Handbook of Professional Practices in Association Management. Jossey-Bass. p. 38. ISBN 978-1118775394. 
  7. ^ Harris, Philip M. (2001). The Guide to National Professional Certification Programs. HRD Press. p. 83. ISBN 978-0874256321. 
  8. ^ "Accreditation - AMC Institute (AMCI)". www.amcinstitute.org. Retrieved 2016-05-22. 
  9. ^ "A new face at Phila.'s Fernley & Fernley". philly-archives. Retrieved 2016-05-30. 
  10. ^ "5 Questions for SmithBucklin President Matt Sanderson – PCMA Convene". www.pcmaconvene.org. Retrieved 2016-05-30. 
  11. ^ "About Us | MCI at a Glance". www.mci-group.com. Retrieved 2016-05-30. 

External links[edit]