Astome

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Astomes
Scientific classification
Domain: Eukaryota
(unranked): SAR
(unranked): Alveolata
Phylum: Ciliophora
Class: Oligohymenophorea
Subclass: Astomatia
Order: Astomatida
Schewiakoff, 1896
Families

Anoplophryidae
Archiastomatidae
Clausilocolidae
Contophryidae
Haptophryidae
Hoplitophryidae
Intoshellinidae
Maupasellidae
Radiophryidae

Astomes (order Astomatida) are a group of ciliate protozoans commonly found in the guts of annelid worms, especially oligochaetes, and other invertebrates.[1] As their name implies, these parasites are characterized by an absence of mouth. The cell is covered by uniform cilia; in addition, some astomes attach themselves to their hosts by suckers, while others use various hooks or barbs.[2]

Asexual reproduction is by transverse fission. In some cases, chains of individuals form by repeated fission without separation of the cells. The sexual phenomenon of conjugation also occurs. Representative genera include Cepedietta, which lives in the amphibian digestive system, and Radiophrya.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pitelka, D. R (2013-10-22). Electron-Microscopic Structure of Protozoa. p. 189. ISBN 9781483184746. 
  2. ^ Cheng, Thomas C (2012-12-02). General Parasitology. p. 250. ISBN 9780323140102.