Asyut Governorate

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Asyut Governorate
Governorate
Flag of Asyut Governorate
Flag
Asyut Governorate on the map of Egypt
Asyut Governorate on the map of Egypt
Coordinates: 27°15′07″N 31°05′24″E / 27.252°N 31.09°E / 27.252; 31.09Coordinates: 27°15′07″N 31°05′24″E / 27.252°N 31.09°E / 27.252; 31.09
Country  Egypt
Seat Asyut (capital)
Government
 • Governor Ibrahim Hamad[1]
Population (2014)
 • Total 4,123,441
Time zone EET (UTC+2)

Asyut Governorate is one of the governorates of Egypt. It stretches forNile. The capital of the governorate is the city of Asyut.

Etymology[edit]

The name of Asyut is derived from early Egyptian Zawty (Z3JW.TJ), late Egyptian Səyáwt into Coptic Syowt.

Statistics[edit]

  • Percentage to total area of Egypt: 2.6%.
  • Population: around 3.5 million (male 51.21%; female 48.79%).
  • Population density: 119.6 people/km².
  • Rural population: 2.2 million; urban population: 0.9 million.
  • Percentage to the whole population of Egypt: 4.3%.
  • Population growth rate: 2.6% per year.
  • Assiut Governorate administrative divisions: 11 localities, 52 local administrative units, 235 small villages, and 971 tiny villages.[2]

Cities[edit]

Important sites[edit]

History[edit]

The governorate of Asyut includes the Ancient Egyptian tombs of Meir, and the town of Durunka, which is a pilgrimage site for many Copts who come to visit a monastery dedicated to the Virgin Mary.

Demography[edit]

Asyut governorate has a population of over 4 million people,with a significant Coptic presence. In 1914, it had the second largest proportion of Copts in Egypt, where they made up 20,7% of the population.[3] However it is likely that figure is underestimated, since the Church claims up to 48,5% while the remaining population are Sunni Muslims.[4]

Prominent people from Asyut[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mansour appoints 20 new governors". Daily News Egypt. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  2. ^ http://www.asuit.gov.eg/EnglishSite/indexen.htm Official Website of the Government of Asyut
  3. ^ http://gulf2000.columbia.edu/images/maps/Christians_of_ME_1914_lg.png
  4. ^ "The Coptic Orthodox Church in action - Al-Ahram Weekly". weekly.ahram.org.eg. Retrieved 2016-02-18. 

External links[edit]