Atari Games

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Atari Games Corporation
TypePrivate
IndustryVideo games
PredecessorAtari, Inc.
FoundedJuly 2, 1984; 37 years ago (1984-07-02)
FounderWarner Communications
Defunct
  • February 7, 2003; 18 years ago (2003-02-07) (disbanded by Midway)
  • October 2, 2013; 7 years ago (2013-10-02) (last assets dissolved)
FateMerged into and later closed by Midway Games
Headquarters675 Sycamore Dr., ,
Key people
  • Hideyuki Nakajima
    (president, 1985–1994)
  • Dan Van Elderen
    (president, 1995–2003)
  • Ed Logg (game designer)
Products
Number of employees
700
Parent
DivisionsTengen

Atari Games Corporation (known as Midway Games West Inc. from 1999) was an American producer of arcade games. It was originally the coin-operated arcade game division of Atari, Inc. and was split off into its own company in 1984. It was one of several companies to use the name Atari.

History[edit]

When the Atari Inc. division of Warner Communications lost $500 million in the first three quarters of 1983, its arcade coin-op division was the only one to make money.[2] In 1984, Warner sold Atari's consumer products division to Jack Tramiel;[3] he named this company Atari Corporation. Warner retained the coin-op division and a few other assets and changed the named of Atari, Inc. to Atari Games, Inc.[4] The agreement between Tramiel and Warner Communications was that Atari Games must always include the "Games" after "Atari" on its logo and that Atari Games could not use the Atari brand at all in the consumer market (computers and home consoles). Atari Games retained most of the same employees and managers that had worked at the old Atari Inc. It was able to carry on with many of its projects from before the transition. Atari Corp., in contrast, froze projects and streamlined staff and operations. In 1985, the controlling interest of Atari Games was sold to Namco, while Warner retained 40% of the company. Namco later lost interest in operating Atari Games and sold 33% of its shares to a group of employees led by then-president Hideyuki Nakajima. As the company was now split between three entities, Warner (40%, Namco (40%, and the employees (20%), and none of them held a controlling share, Atari Games effectively became an independent company.[5] Nakajima had been the president of Atari Games since 1985. Atari Ireland was a subsidiary of Atari Games that manufactured their games for the European market; while under Namco, Atari Ireland also manufactured Sega's Hang-On (1985) for the European market.[6]

Atari Games continued to manufacture arcade games and units, and starting in 1988, also sold cartridges for the Nintendo Entertainment System under the Tengen brand name, including a version of Tetris. The companies exchanged a number of lawsuits in the late 1980s related to disputes over the rights to Tetris and Tengen's circumvention of Nintendo's lockout chip, which prevented third parties from creating unauthorized games. (Atari Games' legal battles with Nintendo were separate from those of Atari Corporation, which also exchanged lawsuits with Nintendo in the late 1980s and early 1990s.) The suit finally reached a settlement in 1994, with Atari Games paying Nintendo cash damages and use of several patent licenses.[7]

In 1989, Warner Communications merged with Time Inc., forming Time Warner. In 1993, Time Warner reacquired a controlling interest in Atari Games and made it a subsidiary of its Time Warner Interactive division. While the company initially maintained the Atari Games brand for arcade games under the new ownership, the Tengen brand was dropped in favor of the Time Warner Interactive label.[8] In mid-1994, the Atari Games, Tengen, and Time Warner Interactive names were all consolidated under the Time Warner Interactive banner.[9]

On July 12, 1994, Atari Games president Hideyuki Nakajima passed away at the age of 64. He was the Atari Games president since 1985, having previously been the Namco America president since 1978, and prior to that the Atari Japan vice-president since 1973.[10]

In April 1996, after an unsuccessful bid by Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell, the company was sold to WMS Industries, owners of the Williams, Bally and Midway arcade brands, which restored the use of the Atari Games name.[11][12] According to Atari Games president Dan Van Elderen, in 1995, Time Warner decided to exit the video game business and instructed the management at Atari Games to find a buyer for themselves, which surprised him because usually parent companies choose the buyers for their subsidiaries.[4] Time Warner would not return to the video game business until the formation of Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment on January 14, 2004.

On April 6, 1998, the video game assets of WMS Industries were spun off as a new independent company called Midway Games,[8] which then gained control of the Atari Games division. However, in 1999, Hasbro Interactive began restructuring the Atari brand for the PC and home console markets after acquiring it from JTS Corporation a year before.[13] On November 19, 1999, Atari Games Corporation was renamed Midway Games West Inc.,[14][8] resulting in the Atari Games name no longer being used.

In 2001, Midway Games exited the arcade industry, due to a decline in the market. Despite this, Midway Games West continued to produce games for the home console market until it was disbanded on February 7, 2003,[8] after a slump in game sales. Although no longer in operation, Midway Games West continued to exist as a holding entity whose primary function was to be the copyright and trademark owner for its properties. In February 2009, Midway Games filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and in July 2009, most of Midway's assets were sold to Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment, ultimately bringing all of the Atari Games properties back to Time Warner again.[15] The entity, however, still existed for other legal reasons until October 2, 2013, when it was finally dissolved for good.[citation needed]

Games[edit]

Developed[edit]

Year Title Original platform(s) Publisher Co-developer
1984 Marble Madness Arcade, Amiga, Atari ST, Commodore 64, Apple II, IBM PC, Apple IIGS, Nintendo Entertainment System, X68000, PC-9800 series, Game Boy, FM Towns, Sega Genesis/Mega Drive, Master System, Game Gear, Game Boy Color, BlackBerry Atari Games Electronic Arts (AGA/GEN), Sandcastle (ST/C64/AII//PC/IIGS), Rare (NES), Home Data (X68K/PC-98/FMT), GameBrains (GB), Tengen (MS/GG/MD), Digital Eclipse (GBC), EA Mobile (BB)
1985 Paperboy Arcade, Acorn Electron, BBC Micro, Commodore 16, Commodore Plus/4, Commodore 64, TRS-80 Color Computer, ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, Apple II, Apple IIGS, MS-DOS, Nintendo Entertainment System, Amiga, Atari ST, Atari Lynx, Game Boy, Master System, Game Gear, Sega Genesis/Mega Drive, Game Boy Color, J2ME, Xbox Live Arcade, BlackBerry, iOS Atari Games, Namco Elite Systems (AE/BBCM/C16/C64/ZXS/CPC/AGA/ST), Kingsoft GmbH (CP/4), Mindscape (AII/IIGS), Magpie Computer Developments (DOS), Eastridge Technology (NES), Al Baker & Associates (Lynx), Tiertex (MS/GG), MotiveTime (GEN), GameBrains (GBC), MoJive (J2ME), Digital Eclipse (XBLA), Vivid Games (iOS)
Peter Pack Rat Arcade, Amstrad CPC, Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum Atari Games Software Creations (CPC/C64/ZXS)
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom Arcade, Amstrad CPC, Commodore 64, MSX, ZX Spectrum, Atari ST, Nintendo Entertainment System, Amiga, Apple II, MS-DOS Atari Games Paragon Programming (CPC/ST/DOS), U.S. Gold (MSX), Tengen (C64/NES/AII), Level Systems (AGA)
Gauntlet Arcade, Atari 8-bit family, Amstrad CPC, Commodore 64, MSX, ZX Spectrum, Atari ST, MS-DOS, Apple IIGS, Apple II, Nintendo Entertainment System, Macintosh, Master System, J2ME, Xbox Live Arcade Atari Games Gremlin Graphics (Atari 8-bit/CPC/C64/MSX/ZXS), Adventure Soft (ST), Mindscape (DOS/AII/IIGS), Tengen (NES), Sorcerer's Apprentice Software Productions (Mac OS), Tiertex (MS), TKO Software (J2ME), Digital Eclipse (XBLA)
1986 Super Sprint Arcade, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum, Nintendo Entertainment System Atari Games Catalyst Coders/Software Studios (CPC/C64/ZXS), State of the Art (ST), Tengen (NES)
Road Runner Arcade, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum, Atari 2600, MS-DOS, Nintendo Entertainment System Atari Games Canvas Software (CPC/ST/C64/ZXS), Atari Corporation (2600), Banana Development (DOS), Beam Software (NES)
Gauntlet II Arcade, Amstrad CPC, Commodore 64, Atari ST, ZX Spectrum, Amiga, MS-DOS, Nintendo Entertainment System, Game Boy, PlayStation Network Atari Games Gremlin Graphics (CPC/C64/ST/ZXS/AGA), Mindscape (DOS/NES), Tengen (GB), Backbone Emeryville (PSN)
Championship Sprint Arcade, Commodore 64, Amstrad CPC, ZX Spectrum, PlayStation Network Atari Games Catalyst Coders/Software Studios (C64/CPC/ZXS), Backbone Emeryville (PSN)
720° Arcade, Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, Nintendo Entertainment System, Game Boy Color Atari Games Tiertex (C64/ZXS/CPC), Tengen (NES), GameBrains (GBC)
1987 RoadBlasters Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum, Atari ST, Nintendo Entertainment System, Atari Lynx, Sega Genesis/Mega Drive Atari Games Probe Software (AGA/ST), DJL Software (CPC/ZXS), Beam Software (NES), Atari Corporation (Lynx), Tengen/Sterling Silver Software (GEN)
APB Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MS-DOS, ZX Spectrum, Atari Lynx Atari Games Walking Circles (AGA/CPC/ST/C64/DOS/ZXS), Quicksilver Software (Lynx)
Xybots Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MSX, ZX Spectrum, Atari Lynx Atari Games Teque Software Development (AGA/CPC/ST/C64/MSX/ZXS), NuFX (Lynx)
1988 Blasteroids Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MS-DOS, MSX, ZX Spectrum Atari Games Teque Software Development (AGA/CPC/ST/C64/MSX/ZXS)
Vindicators Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Nintendo Entertainment System, ZX Spectrum, Commodore 64 Atari Games Consult Computer Systems (AGA/C64), Consult Software (CPC/ST/ZXS), Westwood Associates (NES)
Toobin' Arcade, MSX, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MS-DOS, Nintendo Entertainment System, ZX Spectrum, Game Boy Color Atari Games Teque Software Development (MSX/AGA/CPC/ST/C64/DOS/ZXS), Tengen (NES), Digital Eclipse (GBC)
Cyberball Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MS-DOS, Sega Genesis/Mega Drive, ZX Spectrum, Nintendo Entertainment System Atari Games Quixel (AGA/CPC/ST/C64/DOS/ZXS), Sega (GEN), Tengen (NES)
1989 Hard Drivin' Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, ZX Spectrum, Sega Genesis/Mega Drive, Atari Lynx, Commodore 64 Atari Games Teque Software Development (AGA), Binary Design (CPC/ZXS), Sterling Silver Software (GEN), NuFX (Lynx)
Tetris Arcade, Nintendo Entertainment System Atari Games Tengen (NES)
Vindicators Part II Arcade Atari Games N/A
Escape from the Planet of the Robot Monsters Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MS-DOS, SAM Coupé, ZX Spectrum Atari Games Teque Software Development (AGA/CPC/ST/C64/DOS/ZXS), Tengen (SAM)
Tournament Cyberball 2072 Arcade, Atari Lynx, Xbox Live Arcade Atari Games BlueSky Software (Lynx), Digital Eclipse (XBLA)
S.T.U.N. Runner Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MS-DOS, ZX Spectrum, Atari Lynx Atari Games The Kremlin (AGA/C64/DOS), Mind's Eye (CPC/ZXS), Tengen (ST), Al Baker & Associates (Lynx)
Skull & Crossbones Arcade, Nintendo Entertainment System, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MS-DOS, ZX, Spectrum Atari Games Tengen (NES), Walking Circles (AGA/CPC/ST/C64/DOS/ZXS)
1990 Badlands Arcade, Amiga, Atari ST, Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC Atari Games Teque London (AGA/ST/C64/ZXS/CPC)
Klax Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari 2600, Atari ST, BBC Micro, Commodore 64, MS-DOS, Game Boy, Atari Lynx, MSX, Nintendo Entertainment System, PC-8800 series, PC-9800 series, SAM Coupé, X68000, TurboGrafx-16, ZX Spectrum, Sega Genesis/Mega Drive, Master System, Game Gear, Game Boy Color Atari Games, Namco Teque Software Development (AGA/CPC/ST/C64/DOS/MSX/ZXS), A.C.P. (BBCM), Atari Corporation (2600/Lynx), Hudson Soft (PC-88/PC-98/X68K), ICE Software (SAM), Tengen (GB/NES/GEN/TG-16/MS/GG), Digital Eclipse (GBC)
Hydra Arcade, Amstrad CPC, Amiga, Atari ST, Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum, Atari Lynx Atari Games Moonstone Computing (CPC/ZXS),ICE Software (AGA/ST/C64), NuFX (Lynx)
ThunderJaws Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64 Atari Games The Kremlin (AGA/CPC/ST/C64)
Pit-Fighter Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MS-DOS, Super Nintendo Entertainment System, ZX Spectrum, Sega Genesis/Mega Drive, Atari Lynx, Game Boy, Master System Atari Games Teque London (AGA/CPC/ST/C64/ZXS), Oxford Mobius (DOS), Tengen (SNES/GB), Sterling Silver Software (GEN), Al Baker & Associates (Lynx), The Kremlin (MS)
Race Drivin' Arcade, Amiga, Atari ST, MS-DOS, Super Nintendo Entertainment System, Game Boy, Sega Genesis, Sega Saturn Atari Games Walking Circles (AGA/ST/DOS), Imagineering (SNES), Argonaut Software (GB), Polygames (GEN), Time Warner Interactive (SS)
Shuuz! Arcade Atari Games N/A
1991 Rampart Arcade, Amiga, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MS-DOS, Master System, Nintendo Entertainment System, Sega Genesis/Mega Drive, Super Nintendo Entertainment System, Game Boy, Atari Lynx, Game Boy Color Atari Games The Kremlin (AGA/ST/C64), Bitmasters (DOS/NES/SNES), Punk Development/Developer Resources (MS), Tengen (GEN), C-lab. (GB), Atari Corporation (Lynx), Digital Eclipse (GBC)
Batman Arcade Atari Games N/A
Race Drivin' Panorama Arcade Atari Games N/A
Road Riot 4WD Arcade, Super Nintendo Entertainment System, Atari Falcon Atari Games Equilibrium (SNES), Images Software (Falcon)
Steel Talons Arcade, Atari Lynx, Sega Genesis/Mega Drive, Super Nintendo Entertainment System, Atari Falcon Atari Games NuFX (Lynx), Polygames (GEN), Panoramic Software (SNES), Tengen (Falcon)
Off the Wall Arcade Atari Games N/A
1992 Relief Pitcher Arcade, Super Nintendo Entertainment System Atari Games Tengen (SNES)
Guardians of the 'Hood Arcade Atari Games N/A
Moto Frenzy Arcade Atari Games N/A
Space Lords Arcade Atari Games N/A
1994 T-MEK Arcade, 32X, MS-DOS Atari Games Bits Corporation (32X/DOS)
Primal Rage Arcade, Game Boy, Game Gear, MS-DOS, Sega Genesis, Super Nintendo Entertainment System, 3DO Interactive Multiplayer, 32X, Atari Jaguar CD, PlayStation, Sega Saturn, Amiga Time Warner Interactive Probe Software (GB/GG/GEN/3DO/JAG CD/PS/SS/AGA), Teeny Weeny Games (DOS), Bitmasters (SNES), Time Warner Interactive (32X)
1996 Wayne Gretzky's 3D Hockey Arcade, Nintendo 64 Atari Games Williams Entertainment, Midway Games (N64)
San Francisco Rush: Extreme Racing Arcade, Nintendo 64, PlayStation Atari Games Midway Games (N64), Climax Development (PS)
1997 Mace: The Dark Age Arcade, Nintendo 64 Atari Games Midway Games (N64)
San Francisco Rush the Rock: Alcatraz Edition Arcade, Microsoft Windows Atari Games Midway Games (WIN)
1998 California Speed Arcade, Nintendo 64 Atari Games Midway Games (N64)
Gauntlet Legends Arcade, Nintendo 64, PlayStation, Dreamcast Atari Games Midway Games (N64/PS/DC)
Rush 2: Extreme Racing USA Nintendo 64 Midway Games N/A
1999 War Final Assault Arcade Atari Games N/A
Road Burners Arcade Atari Games N/A
San Francisco Rush 2049 Arcade, Nintendo 64, Dreamcast Atari Games Midway Games (N64/DC)

Published[edit]

Year Title Original platform(s) Developer Co-Publisher Ref.
1987 Rolling Thunder Arcade, Commodore 64, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Nintendo Entertainment System, ZX Spectrum Namco Namco, U.S. Gold (C64/AGA/CPC/ST/ZX), Tengen [16][17]
Dunk Shot Arcade Sega Sega [16][17][18]
Dragon Spirit Arcade, X68000, TurboGrafx-16, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Commodore 64, Nintendo Entertainment System, ZX Spectrum, Atari ST, MS-DOS Namco Namco, Micomsoft (X68K), NEC (TG-16), Domark (AGA/CPC/C64/ZXS/ST/DOS), Bandai (NES) [16][17]
R.B.I. Baseball Arcade, Nintendo Entertainment System Namco Namco, Tengen [16][17]
Pac-Mania Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MSX, ZX Spectrum, X68000, Nintendo Entertainment System, Acorn Archimedes, Master System, Sega Genesis/Mega Drive, BREW, J2ME, Zeebo Namco Namco, Grandslam Interactive (AGA/CPC/ST/C64/MSX/ZXS), Micomsoft (X68K), Tengen (NES/GEN), Domark (AA), TecMagik (MS) [16][17]
1988 Galaga '88 Arcade, TurboGrafx-16, X68000, i-mode, EZweb Namco Namco, NEC (TG-16), Micomsoft (X68K) [16][17][19]
Final Lap Arcade, Famicom Namco Namco, Namcot (FC) [16][17]
Assault Arcade Namco Namco [16][17]
1989 Splatterhouse Arcade, TurboGrafx-16, FM Towns, Microsoft Windows, Windows Mobile, iOS, J2ME, BlackBerry Namco Splatter Team Namco, Ving, MediaKite Distribution [16][17]
Four Trax Arcade, Sega Mega Drive Namco Namco [16][17][20]
1990 Mad Dog McCree Arcade, 3DO Interactive Multiplayer, DVD, iOS, Microsoft Windows, Nintendo 3DS, Philips CD-i, PlayStation Network, Sega CD, Wii American Laser Games CapDisc (CD-i), Digital Leisure (iOS/Windows/Wii), Engine Software (3DS) [17]
1993 Knuckle Bash Arcade Toaplan Toaplan [17][21]
World Rally Arcade Zigurat Software Gaelco, Sigma [17][22][23]
1994 Cops Arcade Nova Production N/A [17]
1995 Area 51 Arcade, Microsoft Windows, Sega Saturn, PlayStation Mesa Logic Time Warner Interactive, Midway Games, SoftBank, GT Interactive Software, Tectoy [24][25][26]
1997 Maximum Force Arcade, PlayStation, Sega Saturn, Microsoft Windows Mesa Logic SNK, Midway Games, GT Interactive Software [27]
Surf Planet Arcade Zigurat Software Gaelco [17]
1998 Radikal Bikers Arcade, PlayStation Gaelco Gaelco, SNK, Infogrames (PS) [28][29]
Vapor TRX Arcade Atari Games Blue Shift [17]
Area 51: Site 4 Arcade Mesa Logic N/A [30]

Cancelled[edit]

Title[31] Genre Publisher(s) Planned Release Date/Last Year Developed or Mentioned Notes/Reasons
3 On 3 Basketball Sports N/A N/A Runs on COJAG hardware.
Accelerator Racing Atari Games 1988 Two-player split-screen racing game.[32]
Arcade Classics Compilation Atari Games 1992 Enhanced compilations of Centipede and Missile Command.[33]
Battle Mech Fighting Atari Games 1992 Artwork under ownership of former Accolade artist Stu Shepherd.[34]
Beat Head Puzzle Atari Games 1993 Tile-matching puzzle game.[35]
Beavis and Butt-Head Beat 'em up Atari Games April 9, 2016 Based upon MTV's eponymous animated series. Runs on a 3DO Interactive Multiplayer-related hardware.[36]
BMX Heat Racing Atari Games 1991 Motorcycle racing game.[37]
BloodLust I.K.3 Fighting Atari Games 1998-02 Sequel to International Karate + developed by System 3. Runs on a PC-based hardware.[38]
Cyberstorm Fighting Atari Games March 23, 2018 Street Fighter II-styled mecha fighting game. Cancelled due to poor aesthetics and animations. Playtested at a Golfland amusement center.[39]
Danger Express Run and gun Atari Games 1992 Discontinued after location testing.[40]
Fishin' Frenzy Fishing Time Warner Interactive 1995 Playtested but full production was scrapped due to lack of earnings.[41] Runs on COJAG hardware.
Freeze Puzzle Atari Games 1996-12 Showcased at the 1996 AMOA show.[42]
Guts and Glory Shoot 'em up Atari Games 1989 Two-player war-themed shoot 'em up game.[43]
Hard Drivin's Airborne Racing Atari Games 1993 Sequel to Hard Drivin' II: Drive Harder.[44]
Hot Rod Rebels Racing N/A 2000 Sequel to San Francisco Rush 2049. Runs on a PC-based hardware.[45]
Marble Man: Marble Madness II Platform, Racing Atari Games September 11, 2008 Sequel to Marble Madness.[46]
Metal Maniax Vehicular combat Atari Games 1994 Development was scrapped due to lack of popularity among arcade players.[47]
Meanstreak Racing, Vehicular combat Atari Games January 15, 2008 Vehicular combat racing game.[48]
Primal Rage II Fighting Atari Games March 23, 2018 Sequel to Primal Rage.[39]
Road Riot's Revenge Rally Racing Atari Games 1993 Sequel to Road Riot 4WD.[49]
Sparkz Puzzle N/A 1992 Grid-based puzzle game.[50]
Street Drivin' Racing Atari Games 1993 Sequel to Hard Drivin's Airborne.[51]
Subs N/A Atari Games N/A N/A
Tenth Degree Fighting Atari Games March 23, 2018 3D fighting game developed by former Capcom employees.[39]
Vicious Circle Fighting Atari Games October 18, 2020 Killer Instinct-styled fighting game.[52]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Namco purchased Atari Games on February 5, 1985.[1] Warner Communications and its successor, Time Warner, continued to own minority interest in Atari Games after Warner sold controlling interest of the company to Namco. Warner did not fully divest itself of Atari Games until 1996.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Overseas Readers Column: Namco Purchases Atari Games Inc" (PDF). Game Machine. No. 255. Amusement Press, Inc. March 1, 1985. p. 24.
  2. ^ Mace, Scott (February 27, 1984). "Can Atari Bounce Back?". InfoWorld. p. 100. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  3. ^ "Warner Sells Atari to Tramiel". The New York Times. July 3, 1984. Retrieved April 12, 2020.
  4. ^ a b "An Interview with Dan Van Elderen". Next Generation. No. 35. Imagine Media. November 1997. p. 82.
  5. ^ McNeil, Steve (April 18, 2019). Hey! Listen!: A journey through the golden era of video games. Headline. p. 104. ISBN 9781472261342.
  6. ^ "Overseas Readers Column: Atari Ireland Plan to Mfg. Sega's "Hang-On" for Europe" (PDF). Game Machine. No. 269. Amusement Press, Inc. October 15, 1985. p. 26.
  7. ^ "Atari's Full-Court Press". GamePro (59). IDG. June 1994. p. 184.
  8. ^ a b c d "A History of AT Games / Atari Games / Midway Games West". mcurrent.name. Archived from the original on June 14, 2017. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  9. ^ "Time Warner's Family Reunion". GamePro. No. 70. IDG. July 1994. p. 170.
  10. ^ "Overseas Readers Column" (PDF). Game Machine. No. 478. Amusement Press, Inc. August 15, 1994. p. 26.
  11. ^ "Tidbits...". Electronic Gaming Monthly. Ziff Davis (82): 17. May 1996.
  12. ^ "Time Warner to Quit Game Business". Next Generation. No. 21. Imagine Media. September 1996. p. 15.
  13. ^ Johnston, Chris (April 8, 2000). "Atari Goes to Hasbro". GameSpot.
  14. ^ "Certificate of Amendment: Atari Games". California Secretary of State. December 22, 1999.
  15. ^ "exv2w1". www.sec.gov. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Atari Videography: Machines produced by Atari with approximate release dates". RePlay. No. 10. RePlay Publishing, Inc. July 1997. pp. 39–45.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p D. Current, Michael (2013). "A History of Atari Games Corp./Midway Games West". Atari History Timelines. University of Wisconsin–La Crosse. Archived from the original on November 6, 2013. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
  18. ^ "Way to the Sega Fan - Sega Arcade History: 1987". Mega Drive Fan (in Japanese). No. 28. Tokuma Shoten. May 1992. pp. 102–105. Archived from the original on October 8, 2020. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
  19. ^ "「ギャラガ'88」、携帯アプリで復活──ナムコEZ ゲームス". ITmedia Mobile (in Japanese). ITmedia. February 26, 2008. Archived from the original on September 16, 2019. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
  20. ^ "ソフトウェア一覧(ソフトライセンシー発売)| メガドライブ". SEGA HARD Encyclopedia (in Japanese). Sega. 2020. Archived from the original on June 26, 2020. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
  21. ^ "Mega AM Network - AOU: 東亜プラン - KNUCKLE BUSH". Beep! MegaDrive (in Japanese). No. 43. SoftBank Creative. April 1993. p. 31. Archived from the original on October 7, 2020. Retrieved October 6, 2020.
  22. ^ "Game Machine's Best Hit Games 25 - テーブル型TVゲーム機 (Table Videos)". Game Machine (in Japanese). No. 457. Amusement Press, Inc. September 15, 1993. p. 29.
  23. ^ García, Julen Zaballa (January 2019). "La Historia De: World Rally Championship". Retro Gamer (in Spanish). No. 26. Axel Springer SE. pp. 138–143.
  24. ^ Drury, Paul (December 2016). "The Making Of: Area 51". Retro Gamer. No. 163. Future Publishing. pp. 48–53.
  25. ^ "セガサターン対応ソフトウェア(ライセンシー発売)- 1997年発売". SEGA HARD Encyclopedia (in Japanese). Sega. 2020. Archived from the original on March 23, 2020. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
  26. ^ "エリア51". PlayStation Official Site Software Catalog (in Japanese). Sony Interactive Entertainment. 2020. Archived from the original on September 22, 2019. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
  27. ^ "Special Feature - ATEI London Show". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 92. Ziff Davis. March 1997. p. 94. Archived from the original on October 7, 2020. Retrieved October 6, 2020.
  28. ^ Steppberger, Ulrich (September 2000). "Test - PS - Radikal Bikers" (PDF). MAN!AC (in German). No. 83. Cybermedia. p. 65.
  29. ^ Castro, Emmanuel (April 20, 2012). "Radikal Bikers - Recordamos el simpático juego de los españoles de Gaelco y que arrasó allí donde pisó". Vandal (in Spanish). El Español. Archived from the original on June 10, 2020. Retrieved October 6, 2020.
  30. ^ Cabral, Matt (March 2008). "Area 51: A History of Violence". PlayStation: The Official Magazine. No. 4. Future US. pp. 82–83. Archived from the original on October 6, 2020. Retrieved October 6, 2020.
  31. ^ "The Games". Atarigames.com. 2008. Archived from the original on May 25, 2019. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
  32. ^ Bousiges, Alexis; Kukulcan, Bruno; Oliver, Paige (2020). "Accelerator". Gaming-History. Archived from the original on August 12, 2016. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
  33. ^ "Arcade Classics". Killer List of Videogames. International Arcade Museum. 2020. Archived from the original on September 11, 2020. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
  34. ^ Shepherd, Stu. "Game Art Zone". The Art of Stu Shepherd. Archived from the original on February 11, 2008. Retrieved December 5, 2020.
  35. ^ "Beat Head". Killer List of Videogames. International Arcade Museum. 2020. Archived from the original on October 17, 2017. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
  36. ^ S. Good, Owen (April 9, 2016). "Rare, canceled Beavis and Butt-Head arcade game surfaces in Chicago-area arcade - They needed to buy a 3DO to repair it". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on July 19, 2017. Retrieved October 6, 2020.
  37. ^ "BMX Heat". Killer List of Videogames. International Arcade Museum. 2020. Archived from the original on August 2, 2017. Retrieved October 7, 2020.
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