Atheist Delusions

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Atheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and Its Fashionable Enemies.
Atheist Delusions cover.jpg
Cover of first edition (hardback)
Author Professor David Bentley Hart
Country United States
Language English
Genre Non-fiction, history, religion
Publisher Yale University Press
Publication date
April 21, 2009
Media type Print (hardback)
Pages 272 pp
ISBN 978-0-300-11190-3
OCLC 150348383
909/.09821 22
LC Class BR162.3 .H37 2009

Atheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and Its Fashionable Enemies is a 2009 book by theologian, philosopher, and cultural commentator David Bentley Hart. The book explores what Hart sees as historical and popular misconceptions of Christianity's detractors.

Content[edit]

Hart explores the role of Christianity and its interactions with other religions, arguing that Christianity differs from religious cults and faiths of the time. He states it has changed, forming the basis of modern culture while dealing with the impact of the gradual decline that began with the separation of Church and state, as well as the age of war that he says resulted.

Hart attempts to explain the people, history, events, and reasons behind what he sees as Christianity's rise, achievements, mistakes, and recent decline in the face of materialism and the power struggles of world leaders. Additionally, he aims to debunk what he says are popular historical myths used to attack Christianity.[1][2]

On 27 May 2011, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr. Rowan Williams, awarded the book the Michael Ramsey Prize in Theology.[3]

There is also a Finnish translation (2010) by Perussanoma press.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yale University Press. "Book Review: Atheist Delusions". Retrieved 24 June 2009. 
  2. ^ Stefan Beck, The New Criterion. "A review of Atheist Delusions: The Christian Revolution and Its Fashionable Enemies by David Bentley Hart". Archived from the original on 24 June 2009. Retrieved 19 May 2014. 
  3. ^ "Winner of £10,000 Theology Prize Announced". The Archbishop of Canterbury. May 2011. Retrieved 19 May 2014.