Athletics at the 1972 Summer Olympics – Men's 10,000 metres

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Men's 10,000 metres
at the Games of the XX Olympiad
Venue Olympic Stadium, Munich, West Germany
Date 31 August 1972
Competitors 51 from 33 nations
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s) Lasse Virén  Finland
2nd, silver medalist(s) Emiel Puttemans  Belgium
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Miruts Yifter  Ethiopia
← 1968
1976 →
Athletics at the
1972 Summer Olympics
Olympic Athletics.png
Track events
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3000 m
steeplechase
men
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Decathlon men

The men's 10,000 metres event at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich was held on 31 August and 3 September. This event featured a qualifying round for the first time since the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. The favorites in the event included Belgium's Emiel Puttemans, Great Britain's Dave Bedford, and Finland's Lasse Virén.[1]

The men's 10,000 metres final was notable for Lasse Virén's world record performance.[2] At the start of the race, Bedford led the pace; he maintained a world record pace at the 4000 m mark, and he still led halfway through the race. On the 12th lap, just before the halfway point, Virén and Tunisia's Mohammed Gammoudi, 10,000 m bronze medalist and 5000 m gold medalist in the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, tangled into each other and fell onto the track.[1] Both recovered, and while Gammoudi fell out of the race two laps later, Virén caught up to the front and passed Bedford to take the lead at about the 6000 m mark.[2]

With Virén leading for the rest of the race, the lead pack reduced to five competitors with 600 m remaining when he made his charge.[3] He ran the final lap (the last 400 m) in 56.4 seconds; he won the gold medal, beating runner-up Puttemans by 7 m and setting a world record time of 27:38.35.[1][2] Virén would go on to win the 5000 metres event, where he would set an Olympic record there; he also went on to win both the 10,000 metres and 5000 metres races at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal.[2]

The Guardian listed Virén's world record performance as the greatest sport comeback of all time.[2]

Heats[edit]

The top four runners in each of the three heats (blue) and the next three fastest (green), advanced to the final round.

Heat one

Rank Name Nationality Time Notes
1 Emiel Puttemans  Belgium 27:53.28 OR
2 Dave Bedford  Great Britain 27:53.64
3 Javier Álvarez  Spain 28:08.58
4 Abdel Kader Zaddem  Tunisia 28:14.70
5 Josef Jánský  Czechoslovakia 28:23.15
6 Anatoly Badrankov  Soviet Union 28:35.84
7 Noël Tijou  France 28:36.08
8 Werner Dössegger  Switzerland 28:36.4
9 Tadesse Wolde-Medhin  Ethiopia 28:45.4
10 Akio Usami  Japan 29:24.8
11 Jeff Galloway  United States 29:35.0
12 Naftali Temu  Kenya 30:19.6
13 Esaie Fongang  Cameroon 31:32.6
14 P.C. Suppiah  Singapore 31:59.2
15 Crispin Quispe  Bolivia 32:31.8
16 Giuseppe Cindolo  Italy 33:03.4
Günter Mielke  West Germany DNF
Usaia Sotutu  Fiji DNF

Heat two

Rank Name Nationality Time
1 Mohammed Gammoudi  Tunisia 27:54.69
2 Mariano Haro  Spain 27:55.89
3 Frank Shorter  United States 27:58.23
4 Lasse Virén  Finland 28:04.41
5 Paul Mose  Kenya 28:18.74
6 Rashid Sharafetdinov  Soviet Union 28:24.64
7 Wohib Masresha  Ethiopia 28:28.2
8 Pedro Miranda  Mexico 28:35.8
9 Karel Lismont  Belgium 28:41.8
10 Neil Cusack  Ireland 28:45.8
11 Dave Holt  Great Britain 28:46.8
12 Keisuke Sawaki  Japan 29:29.0
13 Rafael Pérez  Costa Rica 29:36.6
14 Julio Quevedo  Guatemala 30:08.4
15 Abdel Hamid Khamis  Egypt 30:19.2
16 Lucien Rosa  Ceylon 30:20.2
Richard Mabuza  Swaziland DNF
Abdi Gulet  Somalia DNS
Per Halle  Norway DNS

Heat three

Rank Name Nationality Time
1 Miruts Yifter  Ethiopia 28:18.11
2 Willy Polleunis  Belgium 28:19.71
3 Pavlo Andreiev  Soviet Union 28:20.97
4 Dane Korica  Yugoslavia 28:22.24
5 Juan Martínez  Mexico 28:23.14
6 Lachie Stewart  Great Britain 28:31.33
7 Arne Risa  Norway 28:31.74
8 Jon Anderson  United States 28:34.2
9 Carlos Lopes  Portugal 28:53.6
10 Albrecht Moser  Switzerland 29:05.8
11 Richard Juma  Kenya 29:13.0
12 Domingo Tibaduiza  Colombia 29:24.0
13 Shaq Musa Medani  Sudan 29:32.8
14 Manfred Letzerich  West Germany 29:37.8
15 Hikmet Şen  Turkey 29:51.8
16 Anilus Joseph  Haiti DNF
17 Gavin Thorley  New Zealand DNF
18 Juha Väätäinen  Finland DNS
19 Edmundo Warnke  Chile DNS

Final[edit]

Rank Name Nationality Time Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Lasse Virén  Finland 27:38.35 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Emiel Puttemans  Belgium 27:39.35
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Miruts Yifter  Ethiopia 27:40.96
4 Mariano Haro  Spain 27:48.14
5 Frank Shorter  United States 27:51.32
6 Dave Bedford  Great Britain 28:05.44
7 Dane Korica  Yugoslavia 28:15.18
8 Abdel Kader Zaddem  Tunisia 28:18.17
9 Josef Jánský  Czechoslovakia 28:23.59
10 Juan Martínez  Mexico 28:44.08
11 Pavlo Andreiev  Soviet Union 28:46.27
12 Javier Álvarez  Spain 28:56.38
13 Paul Mose  Kenya 29:02.87
14 Willy Polleunis  Belgium 29:10.15
15 Mohammed Gammoudi  Tunisia DNF

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Athletics at the 1972 München Summer Games: Men's 10,000 metres". Sports-reference.com. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Hendersen, John (7 October 2001). "The 10 greatest comebacks of all time". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  3. ^ Tanser, Toby (September 2004). "Last of the Nordic Gods: Lasse Viren's training and triumphs". Running Times. Retrieved 1 October 2011.