Atilia Caucidia Tertulla

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Atilia Caucidia Tertulla [1] (flourished 2nd century) was an aristocratic woman from Ancient Roman society.

Atilia was a member of the Atilia (gens) and was born into a family of consular rank, probably of Patrician rank.[2] Atilia was the daughter of the Roman Senator, Consul and Governor Marcus Appius Bradua and Caucidia Tertulla.[1][2] Her brother was Marcus Atilius Metilius Bradua Caucidius Tertullus…Bassus.[1][3] He served as a polyonymous Proconsul of the Africa Province under Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius (138-161).[3]

Atilia was an aristocratic, wealthy woman, little is known about her life. She married the distinguished Roman Senator Appius Annius Trebonius Gallus. The father of Atilia and the father of Annius Gallus were consular colleagues in 108.[2]

Atilia bore Annius Gallus two children who were:

Aspasia Annia Regilla and her husband Herodes Atticus had built at Olympia, Greece an outdoor monument called an exedra. Regilla and her husband on the monument had added statues honoring their various relatives and members of the ruling imperial family. Among the statues that Regilla added was of her mother. The headless statue of her mother is on display at the Archaeological Museum of Olympia.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Pomeroy, The murder of Regilla: a case of domestic violence of antiquity p. 15
  2. ^ a b c d Birley, The Roman government of Britain p. 112
  3. ^ a b Birley, The Roman government of Britain p. 113-114
  4. ^ a b Pomeroy, The murder of Regilla: a case of domestic violence of antiquity
  5. ^ http://www.vroma.org/~bmcmanus/women_civicdonors.html

Sources[edit]