Atlanta Fire Rescue Department

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Atlanta Fire Rescue Department
The patch of Atlanta Fire rescue Department- 2014-04-19 11-50.jpg
Operational area
Country  United States
State  Georgia
City Atlanta
Agency overview[1]
Annual calls 87,320 (2014)
Employees 1,125 (2015)
Annual budget $107,490,763 (2015)
Staffing Career
Fire chief Joel Baker
EMS level ALS and BLS
IAFF 134
Facilities and equipment
Battalions 7
Stations 35
Engines 35
Trucks 17
Squads 3
USAR 2
Airport crash 10
Rescue boats 4
Website
Official website
IAFF website

The Atlanta Fire Rescue Department provides fire protection and first responder emergency medical services to the city of Atlanta, Georgia.[2] The department is responsible for an area of 132.6 square miles (343 km2) with over 519,000 residents.[2]

History[edit]

The Atlanta Fire Rescue Department got its start in February of 1848 when residents were ordered to have fire buckets ready in their homes. It wasn't until three years later, after several major fires, that the Georgia Legislature approved a bill that authorized the formation of Atlanta Fire Company No. 1, which went into service on March 25, 1851.[3]

Stations and apparatus[edit]

The Atlanta Fire Rescue Department currently operates out of 34 fire stations, located throughout the city of Atlanta, organized into 7 Battalions, including an Airport Battalion commanding 4 Fire Stations that serve the Hartsfield-Jackson Airport. Below is a list of all of the fire station locations in the city.[4]

Neighborhood Engine Truck Special Chief Battalion
1 Castleberry Hill Engine 1* Truck 1 Decon. Unit 1, Air Unit 7, Air Shuttle Unit Division 1 3
2 Lakewood Heights Engine 2* Truck 2 Decon. Unit 2, Air Bag Unit 2 1
3 North Buckhead Engine 3 Mobile Command Unit 6
5 Westside Engine 5* G.S.A.R. Unit 61 Battalion 4 4
6 Sweet Auburn Engine 6 Squad 4, Q.I.C. Unit 6*, T.S.U. 1 5
8 Hills Park Engine 8 Battalion 2 2
9 Adamsville Engine 9* 2
10 Grant Park Engine 10 Truck 10 Antique Light Truck Battalion 5 5
11 Home Park Engine 11 Truck 11 Mini-Pumper 11, A.T.V. 11, Swift Water Unit 3
12 Edgewood Engine 12 Truck 12 5
13 East Atlanta Engine 13* 5
14 Oakland City Engine 14 Truck 14 1
15 Midtown Engine 15* Truck 15 Battalion 3 3
16 Washington Park Engine 16* Truck 16 Q.I.C. Unit 16* 2
17 Westview Engine 17* EMS 2*, Q.I.C. Unit 17* 4
18 Kirkwood Engine 18 5
19 Inman Park Engine 19 3
20 Capitol View Manor Engine 20 1
21 Buckhead Forest Engine 21* Truck 21 Air Bag Unit 21, G.S.A.R. Unit 6 Battalion 6 6
22 Grove Park Engine 22 2
23 Berkeley Park Engine 23* EMS 1*, Mini-Pumper 23 3
24 Hartsfield–Jackson Airport Engine 24 (ARFF) Truck 47 ARFF 1, ARFF 2, Squad 24, Mini-Pumper 51 7
25 Cascade Heights Engine 25 Truck 25 4
26 Westminister Engine 26* Truck 26 6
27 Chastain Park Engine 27 Hose Tender 27 6
28 Scotts Crossing Engine 28 Foam 28, Reserve Foam Unit 2
29 Piedmont Heights Engine 29 Truck 29 6
30 Glenrose Heights Engine 30* Battalion 1 1
31 Mellwood Engine 31 Truck 31 4
32 Hartsfield–Jackson Airport Engine 32 (ARFF) Med. Unit 1, ARFF, ARFF 7
33 Hartsfield–Jackson Airport Engine 33 (ARFF) Truck 43 (ARFF Quint) ARFF 5, ARFF 6, EMS 3* 7
34 Poole Creek Engine 34 Mobile Ambulance Bus 1 1
35 Hartsfield–Jackson Airport Engine 35 (ARFF) Med. Unit 2, ARFF 7, ARFF 8, ARFF Reserve Battalion 7 7
38 Brookview Heights Engine 38* Truck 38 2
40 Hartsfield–Jackson Airport Engine 40 (ARFF) Truck 41 (ARFF Quint) Med 3, ARFF 3, ARFF 4, Squad 47, Stair Unit 48 7

Notable incidents[edit]

Great Atlanta fire[edit]

The Great Atlanta fire of 1917 broke out in the Old Fourth Ward around 12:30 pm on May 21, 1917.[5] At the time of the fire, the department had simple horse-drawn fire apparatus and the city's fire hydrants were running with low pressure. It is unclear just how the fire started, but it was fueled by hot temperatures and strong winds.[5] After nearly 10 hours, 300 acres (120 ha) had burned, destroying 1,900 structures and displacing over 10,000 people. Damages were estimated at $5 million, ($92 million when adjusted for inflation).[5]

Winecoff Hotel fire[edit]

Main article: Winecoff Hotel fire

The Winecoff Hotel fire, which occurred on December 7, 1946, was the deadliest hotel fire in United States history, killing 119 hotel occupants, including the hotel's owners.[6] The Winecoff Hotel had been advertised as "absolutely fireproof." While the hotel's steel structure was indeed protected against the effects of fire, the hotel's interior finishes were combustible, and the building's exit arrangements consisted of a single stairway serving all fifteen floors.[6] All of the hotel's occupants above the fire's origin on the third floor were trapped, and the fire's survivors either were rescued from upper-story windows or jumped into nets held by firemen.

Bluffton University bus accident[edit]

The Bluffton University bus accident was an automobile crash that occurred during the early morning hours of March 2, 2007, on Interstate 75 in Atlanta. A chartered motorcoach was carrying 33 members of the Bluffton University baseball team when at about 5:38 am EST, the bus rolled off of an overpass killing seven and injuring 29 others. The Atlanta Fire Rescue Department was the primary agency on scene for the crash.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2015 Adopted Budget". City of Atlanta. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "About Us". Atlanta Fire Rescue Department. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 
  3. ^ "History". Atlanta Fire Rescue Department. Retrieved 14 July 2015. 
  4. ^ "Fire Station and NPU Locations". Retrieved 2012-06-24. 
  5. ^ a b c Watts, Gabbie (30 April 2015). "Old Fourth Ward Remembers Great Atlanta Fire Of 1917". WABE. Retrieved 13 July 2015. 
  6. ^ a b "Tragedy In The South: The Winecoff Hotel Fire of 1946". The Winecoff Hotel Fire. Retrieved 13 July 2015.