Atlassian

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Atlassian Corporation Plc
TypePublic
IndustrySoftware
Founded2002; 19 years ago (2002)
Sydney, Australia
FoundersMike Cannon-Brookes
Scott Farquhar
Headquarters341 George Street, ,
Australia
Key people
Mike Cannon-Brookes
Scott Farquhar (Co-Founders & CEOs)
Products
Revenue$1.61 billion (FY2020)[1]
Number of employees
6,117 (Q3FY2021)[2]
Websiteatlassian.com

Atlassian Corporation Plc (/ətˈlæsiən/) is an Australian software company that develops products for software developers, project managers and other software development teams.

History[edit]

Mike Cannon-Brookes and Scott Farquhar founded Atlassian in 2002.[3][4] The pair met while studying at the University of New South Wales in Sydney.[5] They bootstrapped the company for several years, financing the startup with a $10,000 credit card debt.[6]

The name is an ad hoc derivation from the titan Atlas in Greek mythology who had been punished to hold up the Heavens after the Greek gods had overthrown the Titans. (The usual form of the word is Atlantean.) The derivation was reflected in the company's logo used from 2011 through to the 2017 re-branding through a blue X-shaped figure holding up what is shown to be the bottom of the sky.[7]

Atlassian released its flagship product, Jira – a project and issue tracker, in 2002.[8] In 2004, it released Confluence, a team collaboration platform that lets users work together on projects, co-create content, and share documents and other media assets.[9]

In July 2010, Atlassian raised $60 million in venture capital from Accel Partners.[10]

In June 2011, Atlassian announced revenue of $102 million, up 35% from the year before.[11]

In a 2014 restructuring, the parent company became Atlassian Corporation PLC of the UK, with a registered address in London—though the actual headquarters remained in Sydney.[12]

Atlassian has nine offices in six countries: Amsterdam, Austin, New York, San Francisco and Mountain View, California,[13] Manila, Yokohama, Bangalore, and Sydney.

The group has over 4,000 employees serving more than 130,000 customers and millions of users.[2][4][14]

In November 2015, Atlassian announced sales of $320 million,[15] and Shona Brown was added to its board.[16] On 10 December 2015 Atlassian made its initial public offering (IPO) on the NASDAQ stock exchange,[17] under the symbol TEAM, putting the market capitalisation of Atlassian at $4.37 billion.[18] The IPO made its founders Farquhar and Cannon-Brookes Australia's first tech startup billionaires and household names in their native country, despite Atlassian being called a "very boring software company" in The New York Times for its focus on development and management software.[3][19][20]

In March 2019, Atlassian's value was US$26.6 billion.[21] Cannon-Brookes and Farquhar own approximately 30 percent each.

In October 2020, Atlassian announced the end of support for their "Server" products[22] with sales ending in February 2021 and support ending in February 2024 in order to focus on "Cloud" and "Data Center" editions.

Sales setup[edit]

Atlassian does not have a traditional sales team, relying instead on its website[23] and its partner channel.[24][25]

Acquisitions and product announcements[edit]

Additional products include Crucible, FishEye, Bamboo, and Clover which target programmers working with a code base. FishEye, Crucible and Clover came into Atlassian's portfolio through the acquisition of another Australian software company, Cenqua, in 2007.[26]

In 2010, Atlassian acquired Bitbucket, a hosted service for code collaboration.[27]

In 2012, Atlassian acquired HipChat, an instant messenger for workplace environments. Then in May 2012, Atlassian Marketplace was introduced as a website where customers can download plug-ins for various Atlassian products.[28][29][30] That same year Atlassian also released Stash, a Git repository for enterprises, later renamed Bitbucket Server.[31] Also, Doug Burgum became chairman of its board of directors in July 2012.[32]

In 2013, Atlassian announced a Jira service desk product with full service-level agreement support.[33]

In 2015 it announced its acquisition of work chat company Hall, with the intention of migrating all of Hall's customers across to its own chat product HipChat.[34]

A small startup called Dogwood Labs in Denver, Colorado which had a product called StatusPage (that hosts pages updating customers during outages and maintenance) was acquired in July 2016.[35][36]

In January 2017 Atlassian announced the purchase of Trello for $425 million.[37]

On 7 September 2017 the company launched Stride, a web chat alternative to Slack.[38][39] Less than a year later, on 26 July 2018, Atlassian announced it was going to exit the chat business, that it had sold the intellectual property for HipChat and Stride to competitor Slack, and that it was going to shut down HipChat and Stride in 2019. As part of the deal, Atlassian took a small stake in Slack.[40]

On 4 September 2018 the company acquired OpsGenie (a tool that generates alerts for helpdesk tickets) for $295 million.[41]

On 18 March 2019, the company announced that it had acquired Agilecraft for $166 million.[42]

On 17 October 2019, Atlassian completed acquisition of Code Barrel, makers of "Automation for Jira", available on Jira Marketplace.[43]

On 12 May 2020, Atlassian acquired Halp (a tool that generates helpdesk tickets from Slack conversations[44]) for an undisclosed amount.[45]

On 30 July 2020, Atlassian announced acquisition of Asset Management company - Mindville to add to the power of its ITSM tool-set for an undisclosed amount.[46]

On 26 February 2021, Atlassian acquired cloud-based visualization and analytics company Chartio.[47]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Atlassian Announces Fourth Quarter and Fiscal Year 2020 Results". Atlassian Corporation Plc. 2020. Retrieved 1 August 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Investor Relations Data Sheet" (PDF). Atlassian Corporation Plc. 2021. Retrieved 6 May 2021.
  3. ^ a b Moses, Asher (15 July 2010). "From Uni dropouts to software magnates". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 4 December 2013.
  4. ^ a b "Atlassian Shareholder Letter Q2 FY19" (PDF). Atlassian. Atlassian. 17 January 2019. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  5. ^ Asher, Moses. "From Uni dropouts to software magnates". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 14 December 2012. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  6. ^ Mckenzie, Hamish. "Hard yakka: Why Atlassian's founders are the pride of Australia's startup world". PandoDaily. Archived from the original on 17 May 2013. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  7. ^ "Behind the Scenes of the Atlassian Logo Redesign - Atlassian Blog". 27 October 2011. Retrieved 28 September 2017.
  8. ^ Weinberger, Matt. "The co-CEOs of $26 billion Atlassian changed the way programmers work together. Now, they explain their plan to do it for everybody else too". Business Insider. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  9. ^ "Products". Atlassian. Archived from the original on 14 May 2013. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  10. ^ Tam, Pui-Wing. "Accel Invests $60 Million in Atlassian". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on 17 March 2013. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  11. ^ Schonfeld, Erick. "Atlassian's 2011 Revenues Were $102 Million With No Sales People". Tech Crunch. Archived from the original on 21 May 2013. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  12. ^ Hutchinson, James. "Atlassian's Farquhar justifies London switch". Archived from the original on 13 October 2015. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  13. ^ Bryce Druzin (28 November 2016). "San Francisco software firm opens Silicon Valley hub". Silicon Valley Business Journal. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  14. ^ Sharma, Mahesh (9 April 2014). "Atlassian valued at $3.5 billion". IT Pro. Archived from the original on 15 May 2014. Retrieved 22 May 2014.
  15. ^ Lunden, Ingrid; Roof, Katie; Wilhelm, Alex (9 November 2015). "Enterprise Software Co Atlassian Files IPO on Sales Of $320M, Net Income Of $6.8M in 2015". Tech Crunch. Archived from the original on 11 February 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  16. ^ "Form F-1 Amendment 3: Registration of Securities". US Securities and Exchange Commission. 7 December 2015. Archived from the original on 13 March 2016. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  17. ^ Primack, Dan. "And the Price of the Last Big Tech IPO of 2015 Is..." Archived from the original on 11 December 2015.
  18. ^ "And the Price of the Last Big Tech IPO of 2015 Is..." Fortune. Retrieved 17 December 2018.
  19. ^ Finley, Klint. "Atlassian Challenges GitHub to a Fork Fight". Wired. Archived from the original on 22 May 2013. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  20. ^ Bowles, Nellie (13 February 2019). "The Strange Experience of Being Australia's First Tech Billionaires". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 18 September 2020.
  21. ^ Kruger, Colin (19 March 2019). "Atlassian founders worth $10 billion each after record stock rise". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  22. ^ Atlassian. "Navigate changes to server and Data Center". Atlassian. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  23. ^ Douglas MacMillan (8 April 2014). "Atlassian Valued at $3.3 Billion Selling Business Software Sans Salespeople". Wall Street Journal Digits blog. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  24. ^ Player, Chris. "Atlassian's partner program comes of age".
  25. ^ Teal, Kelly. "Atlassian 'Doubling Down' on Cloud Means More Margin for Partners".
  26. ^ Burnette, Ed. "Atlassian acquires Cenqua, drops .NET". ZDNet. Archived from the original on 19 June 2013. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  27. ^ Rao, Leena. "Atlassian Buys Mercurial Project Hosting Site BitBucket". Tech Crunch. Archived from the original on 14 May 2013. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  28. ^ Miller, Kyle. "Browse, Try, Buy, on Atlassian Marketplace". Atlassian Blogs. Archived from the original on 1 July 2013. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  29. ^ "Atlassian announces app store for app developers". SD Times. Archived from the original on 10 May 2013. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  30. ^ "Atlassian Launches A Marketplace For Project Management Add-Ons". Tech Crunch. Archived from the original on 12 August 2016. Retrieved 16 June 2016.
  31. ^ Frederic Lardinois (22 September 2015). "Atlassian Updates Its Git Services, Combines Them Under The Bitbucket Brand". Tech Crunch. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  32. ^ Natalie Apostolou (20 July 2012). "Atlassian heading for the exit? New Board members have extensive experience selling software companies to the big boys". The Register. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  33. ^ Barb Darrow (2 October 2013). "Atlassian parlays Jira issue tracking tool in service desk world". Giga Om. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  34. ^ "Atlassian buys rival work chat tool Hall". Business Spectator / The Australian Business Review. 8 May 2015.
  35. ^ Frederic Lardinois (14 July 2016). "Atlassian acquires StatusPage". Tech Crunch. Archived from the original on 19 January 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  36. ^ Ben Miller (16 July 2016). "Denver tech company bought, moving to San Francisco". Denver Business Journal. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  37. ^ Frederic Lardinois (9 January 2017). "Atlassian acquires Trello for $425M". Tech Crunch. Archived from the original on 29 January 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  38. ^ Lardinois, Frederic. "Atlassian launches Stride, its Slack competitor | TechCrunch". Archived from the original on 7 September 2017. Retrieved 7 September 2017.
  39. ^ "Atlassian launches Stride, the latest would-be Slack killer". Reuters. 7 September 2017. Archived from the original on 10 September 2017. Retrieved 11 September 2017.
  40. ^ Bass, Dina; Huet, Ellen (26 July 2018). "Goodbye HipChat: Slack and Atlassian Team Up on Chat Software". www.bloomberg.com. Bloomberg. Retrieved 4 July 2019.
  41. ^ Grant, Nico; Bass, Dina (4 September 2018). "Atlassian Buys OpsGenie to Expand in ServiceNow's Market". Bloomberg L.P. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  42. ^ "Atlassian acquires AgileCraft for $166M". Techcrunch. Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  43. ^ "Atlassian acquires Code Barrel, makers of Automation for Jira". TechCrunch. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  44. ^ "Atlassian acquires help desk firm Halp".
  45. ^ "Atlassian acquires Halp to bring Slack integration to the forefront". Techcrunch. Retrieved 14 May 2019.
  46. ^ "Atlassian acquires asset management company Mindville". TechCrunch. Retrieved 30 September 2020.
  47. ^ Dignan, Larry. "Atlassian acquires Chartio, plans to add data visualization to Jira". ZDNet. Retrieved 14 March 2021.

External links[edit]