Audubon Park, New Jersey

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Audubon Park, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Audubon Park
Motto: We live somewhere special[1]
Audubon Park highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Audubon Park highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Audubon Park, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Audubon Park, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°53′49″N 75°05′20″W / 39.896837°N 75.088819°W / 39.896837; -75.088819Coordinates: 39°53′49″N 75°05′20″W / 39.896837°N 75.088819°W / 39.896837; -75.088819[2][3]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Camden
Incorporated October 28, 1947
Named for John James Audubon
Government[7]
 • Type Borough
 • Body Borough Council
 • Mayor Lawrence E. "Larry" Pennock (D, term ends December 31, 2018)[4][5]
 • Clerk Dawn Pennock[6]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.155 sq mi (0.402 km2)
 • Land 0.145 sq mi (0.376 km2)
 • Water 0.010 sq mi (0.026 km2)  6.37%
Area rank 562nd of 566 in state
37th of 37 in county[2]
Elevation[8] 20 ft (6 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 1,023
 • Estimate (2015)[12] 1,011
 • Rank 534th of 566 in state
34th of 37 in county[13]
 • Density 7,046.7/sq mi (2,720.7/km2)
 • Density rank 59th of 566 in state
4th of 37 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08106[14][15]
Area code(s) 856 exchanges: 233, 337, 619, 916, 962[16]
FIPS code 3400702230[2][17][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885145[2][19]
Website www.audubonparknj.org

Audubon Park is a borough in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,023,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 79 (-7.2%) from the 1,102 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 48 (-4.2%) from the 1,150 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Audubon Park was incorporated as a borough on July 3, 1947, from portions of Audubon Borough, based on the results of a referendum held on October 28, 1947, making it the most recently created municipality in Camden County.[21] Audubon Park is a dry town where alcohol cannot be sold.[22][23]

History[edit]

Audubon Park was established as a community within Audubon in 1941 with the construction of 500 housing units for employees of New York Shipbuilding in Camden, New Jersey. It is named for naturalist John James Audubon.[24] This was the first of eight projects undertaken by the Mutual Ownership Defense Housing Division of the Federal Works Agency under the leadership of Colonel Lawrence Westbrook. Residents of Audubon, seeking to rid itself of the development's Democratic voters and its public school students, pushed for and passed a referendum to form Audubon Park in 1947. The Audubon Mutual Housing Corporation owns and administers all property in the borough and in turn is responsible for renting homes to residents.[25][26][27]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, Audubon Park borough had a total area of 0.155 square miles (0.402 km2), including 0.145 square miles (0.376 km2) of land and 0.010 square miles (0.026 km2) of water (6.37%).[2][3]

Audubon Park borders Audubon, Collingswood, and Oaklyn.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1950 1,859
1960 1,713 −7.9%
1970 1,492 −12.9%
1980 1,274 −14.6%
1990 1,150 −9.7%
2000 1,102 −4.2%
2010 1,023 −7.2%
Est. 2015 1,011 [12][28] −1.2%
Population sources:1950-2000[29]
1950-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census counted 1,023 people, 493 households, and 282 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,046.7 per square mile (2,720.7/km2). The borough contained 499 housing units at an average density of 3,437.3 per square mile (1,327.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.95% (1,002) White, 0.29% (3) Black or African American, 0.10% (1) Native American, 0.29% (3) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.10% (1) from other races, and 1.27% (13) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 2.05% (21) of the population.[9]

Out of a total of 493 households, 15.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 35.3% were married couples living together, 18.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.8% were non-families. 37.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 18.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.08 and the average family size was 2.70.[9]

In the borough, 13.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 21.9% from 25 to 44, 30.9% from 45 to 64, and 26.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48.7 years. For every 100 females the census counted 77.3 males, but for 100 females at least 18 years old, it was 75.0 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $41,726 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,661) and the median family income was $53,036 (+/- $8,477). Males had a median income of $46,176 (+/- $8,213) versus $38,036 (+/- $5,655) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $23,855 (+/- $2,141). About 5.7% of families and 7.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.0% of those under age 18 and 7.9% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 1,102 people, 496 households, and 302 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,561.7 people per square mile (2,836.6/km2). There were 499 housing units at an average density of 3,424.1 per square mile (1,284.4/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 98.91% White, 0.36% African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.09% from other races, and 0.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.64% of the population.[31][32]

There were 496 households out of which 22.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.7% were married couples living together, 16.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.1% were non-families. 35.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.88.[31][32]

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.2% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 27.0% from 45 to 64, and 18.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 80.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 73.9 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the borough was $34,643, and the median income for a family was $41,029. Males had a median income of $36,250 versus $25,662 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $16,926. About 9.0% of families and 8.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.1% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Audubon Park is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by Audubon Park, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[34][35]

As of 2016, the Mayor of Audubon Park is Democrat Lawrence "Larry" Pennock, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018.[4] Members of the Borough Council are Council President Karen Lewis (D, 2017), John Carpinelli (D, 2018), Dennis Delengowski (D, 2016), Judith DiPasquale (D, 2017), Sandra "Sandy" Hook (D, 2018), Gloria Jones (D, 2016).[36][37][38][39][40]

In January 2014, the Borough Council selected John Carpinelli from among three names nominated by the Democratic municipal committee to fill the vacant seat of Frederick T. Passon following his death. Carpinelli served on an interim basis until the November 2014 general election, when he was elected to serve the balance of the term expiring in December 2015.[41]

In May 2012, the Borough council chose Judy Judy DiPasquale from among a list of three names provided to fill the vacant seat of Charles Beeman.[42]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Audubon Park is located in the 1st Congressional district[43] and is part of New Jersey's 5th state legislative district.[10][44][45] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Audubon Park had been in the 6th state legislative district.[46]

New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden).[47] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[48] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[49][50]

For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 5th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Nilsa Cruz-Perez (D, Barrington) and in the General Assembly by Arthur Barclay (D, Camden) and Patricia Egan Jones (D, Barrington).[51] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[52] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[53]

Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year.[54] As of 2015, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. (Collingswood, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2017; term as director ends 2015),[55] Freeholder Deputy Director Edward T. McDonnell (Pennsauken Township, term as freeholder ends 2016; term as deputy director ends 2015),[56] Michelle Gentek (Gloucester Township, 2015),[57] Ian K. Leonard (Camden, 2015),[58] Jeffrey L. Nash (Cherry Hill, 2015),[59] Carmen Rodriguez (Merchantville, 2016)[60] and Jonathan L. Young, Sr. (Berlin Township, November 2015; serving the unexpired term of Scot McCray ending in 2017)[61][62][63]

Camden County's constitutional officers, all elected directly by voters, are County clerk Joseph Ripa,[64] Sheriff Charles H. Billingham,[65] and Surrogate Patricia Egan Jones.[63][66] The Camden County Prosecutor Mary Eva Colalillo was appointed by the Governor of New Jersey with the advice and consent of the New Jersey Senate (the upper house of the New Jersey Legislature).[67]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 800 registered voters in Audubon Park, of which 535 (66.9% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 55 (6.9% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 210 (26.3% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[68] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 78.2% (vs. 57.1% in Camden County) were registered to vote, including 90.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[68][69]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 368 votes (67.9% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 164 votes (30.3% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 7 votes (1.3% vs. 0.9%), among the 542 ballots cast by the borough's 832 registered voters, for a turnout of 65.1% (vs. 70.4% in Camden County).[70][71] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 374 votes (64.5% vs. 66.2% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 183 votes (31.6% vs. 30.7%) and other candidates with 17 votes (2.9% vs. 1.1%), among the 580 ballots cast by the borough's 814 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.3% (vs. 71.4% in Camden County).[72] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 425 votes (69.0% vs. 61.7% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 183 votes (29.7% vs. 36.4%) and other candidates with 2 votes (0.3% vs. 0.8%), among the 616 ballots cast by the borough's 810 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.0% (vs. 71.3% in the whole county).[73]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 69.5% of the vote (216 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 29.9% (93 votes), and other candidates with 0.6% (2 votes), among the 323 ballots cast by the borough's 831 registered voters (12 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 38.9%.[74][75] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 184 ballots cast (52.0% vs. 53.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 137 votes (38.7% vs. 38.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 18 votes (5.1% vs. 4.5%) and other candidates with 9 votes (2.5% vs. 1.1%), among the 354 ballots cast by the borough's 809 registered voters, yielding a 43.8% turnout (vs. 40.8% in the county).[76]

Education[edit]

Audubon Park is a non-operating school district, having closed its lone school in 1979, after which students were sent outside of the borough as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[25][77] Public school students from Audubon Park attend school in Audubon, having been consolidated into the Audubon School District.[78]

Students from Audubon Park, and from all of Camden County, are eligible to attend the Camden County Technical Schools, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at Gloucester Township Technical High School in the Sciklerville section of Gloucester Township or Pennsauken Technical High School in Pennsauken Township. Students are accepted based on district admission standards and costs of attendance and transportation are covered by the home district of each student.[79]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 3.07 miles (4.94 km) of roadways, of which 2.48 miles (3.99 km) were maintained by the municipality, 0.11 miles (0.18 km) by Camden County, 0.28 miles (0.45 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 0.20 miles (0.32 km) by the Delaware River Port Authority.[80]

Route 168 (Black Horse Pike) runs for 0.3 miles (0.48 km) from Audubon to Haddon Township.[81]

A small 0.2 miles (0.32 km) piece of Interstate 76 connects Route 168 in Audubon Park to Camden.[82][83]

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit bus service is available in the borough on routes 400 (between Sicklerville in Winslow Township and Philadelphia) and 450 (between the Cherry Hill Mall and Camden).[84][85]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Home Page, Borough of Audubon Park. Accessed September 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  3. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  4. ^ a b A Note From the Mayor, Borough of Audubon Park. Accessed June 23, 2016.
  5. ^ 2016 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed June 14, 2016.
  6. ^ Clerk's Office, Borough of Audubon Park. Accessed June 23, 2016.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 33.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Audubon Park, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Audubon Park borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 3, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 3. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Audubon Park borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 3, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015 - 2015 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 22, 2016.
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  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Audubon Park, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 3, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Audubon, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  17. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 3, 2012.
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  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed October 3, 2012.
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 103. Accessed October 3, 2012.
  22. ^ New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control. New Jersey ABC list of dry towns (May 1, 2013)
  23. ^ Giordano, Rita. "More towns catching liquor-license buzz; Moorestown considers ending its dry spell", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 24, 2007. Accessed February 16, 2014.
  24. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 27, 2015.
  25. ^ a b Atkins, Lissa D. "Audubon Park: No home ownership here", Courier-Post, October 19, 2006. Accessed December 26, 2013. "Audubon Park's only school is built. The school closed in 1979 because of declining enrollment; Audubon Park school children now attend schools in the Audubon School District."
  26. ^ History, Borough of Audubon Park. Accessed October 21, 2016.
  27. ^ Nicolosi, Peggy. Camden County Report on Non-operating School District: Audubon Park, New Jersey Department of Education, June 30, 2009. Accessed October 21, 2016. "All property in the borough is owned by the Audubon Mutual Housing Corporation, which rents homes to residents."
  28. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  29. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Camden County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed October 3, 2012.
  30. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  31. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Audubon Park borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 3, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Audubon Park borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 3, 2012.
  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Audubon Park borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 3, 2012.
  34. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  35. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  36. ^ Council, Borough of Audubon Park. Accessed June 23, 2016.
  37. ^ 2016 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Borough of Audubon Park. Accessed June 23, 2016.
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  40. ^ Official Election Results 2013 General Election November 5, 2013, Camden County, New Jersey, November 14, 2013. Accessed June 23, 2016.
  41. ^ Minutes of the Working Session held January 20, 2014, Borough of Audubon Park. Accessed February 11, 2015. ""Councilwoman Hook, Democrat Committee Chair presented three names to the Mayor and Borough Council to fill the seat vacated by Councilman Fred Passon due to his passing away.... Mayor Pennock swears in John Carpinelli while Chief Mark Cavallo holds the Bible."
  42. ^ May 21, 2012, Meeting Minutes, Borough of Audubon Park. Accessed December 26, 2013. "Denise Balderama, Camden County Committeewoman presented the Mayor and Borough Council with three names to fill the seat of Charles Beeman.... Councilwoman Lewis nominated Judy DiPasquale for Council. With no further nominations, Councilwoman Jones closed. All ayes."
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  48. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  49. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  56. ^ Freeholder Edward T. McDonnell, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  57. ^ Freeholder Michelle Gentek, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  58. ^ Freeholder Ian K. Leonard, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  59. ^ Freeholder Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  60. ^ Freeholder Carmen Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  61. ^ Jonathan L. Young, Sr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  62. ^ Daniels, Mark. "Carpenters union official tapped for Camden County Freeholder seat", South Jersey Times, January 22, 2015. Accessed May 12, 2015. "Democratic leaders in Camden County have nominated a construction union official from Berlin Township to fill an open seat on the board of chosen freeholders. Jonathan L. Young Sr., 45, has been nominated to replace Scot McCray, who resigned from the board in late December, citing a desire to spend more time with his family."
  63. ^ a b Board of Freeholders, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  64. ^ County Clerk, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  65. ^ Sheriff, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
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  76. ^ 2009 Governor: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  77. ^ 13 Non-Operating School Districts Eliminated, New Jersey Department of Education press release dated July 1, 2009. Accessed December 25, 2009.
  78. ^ Davy, Lucille E.Letter to Audubon Park School District, New Jersey Department of Education, June 30, 2009. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  79. ^ About Our Schools, Camden County Technical Schools. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  80. ^ Camden County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  81. ^ Route 168 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, April 2009. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  82. ^ Interstate 76 Connector Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2008. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  83. ^ Enlarged View 43 (Gloucester City and Camden City, Camden County), New Jersey Department of Transportation, June 2009. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  84. ^ Camden County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 28, 2010. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  85. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed December 26, 2013.

External links[edit]