Auge

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In Greek mythology, Auge /ˈɔː/[1] (Greek: Αὐγή) a daughter of Aleus and Neaera and priestess of Athena Alea at Tegea, bore the hero Telephus to Heracles.

Mythology[edit]

Aleus had been told by an oracle that he would be overthrown by his grandson[2] so Auge secreted hid the baby in the temple of Athena. A scarcity of grain alerted Aleus that there was a profanation of the temple, and he discovered the child.

In one version the baby was exposed on Mount Parthenion above Tegea, where Telephus was suckled by a deer.[3]

In another version Auge was given to Nauplius ("sailor") who was to kill her, but who, taking pity, brought her to Teuthras, a king in Mysia, in Asia Minor. Alternatively, Auge and Telephus were put in a crate and set adrift on the sea.[4] They washed up in Mysia, where Telephus later appeared in his wanderings; mother and son were about to consummate their marriage when they were parted by a thunderbolt.

In the time of Pausanias (2nd century CE), the tomb of Auge was still shown at Pergamon, where the Attalids venerated Telephus as a founding hero.[5] In the Telephus frieze on the Great Altar of Pergamon, Auge appears in a subsidiary role.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Dictionary of Name Pronunciation - Pronounce Auge
  2. ^ Compare the fate of Cronus; a similar oracle presaged the begetting of Achilles.
  3. ^ Bibliotheke 2.7.4; 3.9.1.
  4. ^ Compare the fate of Danaë and Perseus
  5. ^ Pausanias 8.4.6.

References[edit]