Aughts

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The aughts is a way of referring to the decade 2000 to 2009 in American English.[1][2][3] The equivalent term used in British English is the noughties.[4][5] These arise from the words aught and nought respectively, both meaning zero.

In the English-speaking world, a name for the decade was never universally agreed on as it was for decades such as the eighties, the nineties, etc.[6][7][8][9][10] Orthographically, the decade can be written as the "2000s" or the "'00s", leading people to refer to it as the "two-thousands", "ohs", "oh ohs", or "double ohs". Others referred to it as the "zeros".

The noughties became a common name for the decade in the UK[11][12][13][14][15] and in New Zealand and Australia.[16][17]

Although use of the word aught referring to zero is not widespread in the US, aughts rose to currency to refer to the decade in the US.[18][19][20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "aughts". Merriam-Webster Dictionary.
  2. ^ "aughts". Oxford English Dictionary.
  3. ^ "aughts". Lexico UK Dictionary. Oxford University Press.
  4. ^ "noughties". Oxford English Dictionary.
  5. ^ "noughties". Lexico UK Dictionary. Oxford University Press.
  6. ^ Hitchings, Leah (December 8, 2000). "Even with 10 years to decide, still no name for the decade". News.yahoo.com. Archived from the original on 2010-01-17. Retrieved February 13, 2012.
  7. ^ Washington Examiner, December 1, 2009; modified March 16, 2012. Say, goodbye to the aughts, zeros, 2000s, whatever. retrieved March 1, 2013. Archived April 12, 2013, at archive.today
  8. ^ "What Do You Call It?". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2017-04-22.
  9. ^ "The noughties: So where are we now?". BBC News. January 1, 2000. Archived from the original on 2014-05-12. Retrieved April 21, 2010.
  10. ^ Rohrer, Finlo (December 31, 2009). "Decade dilemma". BBC News. Archived from the original on 2013-12-14. Retrieved April 21, 2010.
  11. ^ Hill, Dave (March 29, 2011). "Olympic hockey and Leyton Orient: the astroturf connection". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 2012-05-26. Retrieved November 30, 2011.
  12. ^ McCormick, Neil (September 18, 2009). "100 songs that defined the Noughties". The Daily Telegraph. London. Archived from the original on 2014-05-13. Retrieved November 30, 2011.
  13. ^ Tedmanson, Sophie (October 20, 2009). "The Noughties year by year". The Times. London. Archived from the original on 2011-08-18. Retrieved November 30, 2011.
  14. ^ Tremlett, Giles (March 28, 2011). "At-a-glance guide to Spain". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 2012-05-29. Retrieved November 30, 2011.
  15. ^ Bowers, Simon (March 23, 2011). "Budget 2011: Chancellor moves to close online VAT loophole". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 2013-02-06. Retrieved November 30, 2011.
  16. ^ Stewart, Cameron (December 26, 2009). "The roaring noughties". The Australian. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  17. ^ Huxley, John (December 26, 2009). "Never so good". Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 2012-11-05. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  18. ^ Irwin, Neil (January 2, 2010). "Aughts were a lost decade for U.S. economy, workers". The Washington Post. Retrieved November 30, 2011.
  19. ^ Noveck, Jocelyn (December 21, 2009). "50 things that changed our lives in the aughts". Seattle Times. Retrieved 28 February 2021.
  20. ^ Okwodu, Janelle (February 17, 2021). "Paris Hilton Remains the Ultimate Aughts Muse". Vogue. Retrieved 2021-02-28.