August Geiger (architect)

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August Geiger
Born 1887
New Haven, Connecticut
Died 1968
Nationality USA
Occupation Architect
Buildings Dade County Courthouse
Miami City Hospital

August Geiger (September 2, 1887[1] - 1968) was one of the most prominent American architects in South Florida from 1905 to the late 1940s. He experimented in Mission, Neo-Renaissance and Art Deco architecture, but is most noted for his works in the Mediterranean Revival style. A number of his works are listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.

Life[edit]

Geiger's notice for services

Geiger was born in New Haven, Connecticut, the son of Margaretha (Rettenmeyer) Geiger and Louis Geiger, a manufacturer of moldings and other fine woodwork for interior decoration. He was educated at the city's public schools, and completed his studies at Boardman's Manual Training School. Showing a talent for drawing and design, he determined to be an architect and secured a position in a New Haven firm. In 1905, Geiger moved to Miami, where he had vacationed with his family since around 1899, and worked at a local architectural firm for 6 years.[2] The 10th registered architect in Florida, he opened his own firm in 1911, and in 1915 opened a second office in Palm Beach. He worked for Carl Fisher on various construction projects in Miami Beach, and was appointed architect for the Dade County School Board.[3] In 1915 he married Ruth Hinson.[4]

Some of his projects[edit]

Dade County Courthouse, 1925

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
Bibliography
  • Klepser, Carolyn & Parks, Arva Moore, Miami Then and Now (Then & Now) (Thunder Bay Press; 2002); ISBN 978-1-57145-852-0
  • Barbara Baer Capitman, Deco Delights: Preserving the Beauty and Joy of Miami Beach Architecture (New York: E. P. Dutton, 1988)
  • Armbruster; Kleinberg; Florida Architecture and Allied Arts, 1939, 1940, 1941; Curl; Works Progress Administration
  • Patricia Gabriel, The Villagers’’ Book of Outstanding Homes of Miami (Coral Gables, Fla.: University of Miami Press, 1975
  • Florida Editors Association, The Book of Florida (No place); James O. Jones, 1925

External links[edit]