Augustus Jackson

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Augustus Jackson (born April 16, 1808) was an African-American candy confectioner from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Jackson served as a chef in the White House during the 1820s. While not the inventor of or first person to serve ice cream in the United States, Jackson is often called the "father of ice cream" because he pioneered many of its modern manufacturing methods including adding salt to the ice.[1] Additionally, Jackson "developed techniques to control the custard while it was freezing."[2] There is no evidence that Jackson patented any of his recipes or techniques.[3]

After leaving the white house, Jackson moved to Philadelphia and created his own successful catering business. He also developed ice cream flavors which he packaged in tin cans and distributed to other ice cream parlors in Philadelphia. Jackson became one of the city's wealthiest residents at the time.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schockett, Joni (July 17, 2008). "You scream, I scream, it's July,eee National Ice Cream Month". Washington Jewish Week.
  2. ^ Black firsts : 4,000 ground-breaking and pioneering historical events. Smith, Jessie Carney, 1930- (Third ed.). Detroit. ISBN 9781578593699. OCLC 826299100.CS1 maint: others (link)
  3. ^ Anonymous (Feb 14, 2012). "Famous Black Chefs". Philadelphia Tribune.
  4. ^ Black firsts : 4,000 ground-breaking and pioneering historical events. Smith, Jessie Carney, 1930- (Third ed.). Detroit. ISBN 9781578593699. OCLC 826299100.CS1 maint: others (link)

Further reading[edit]