Augustus Richard Norton

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Augustus Richard Norton (born September 2, 1946) is an American professor and retired army officer. He is currently a professor of international relations and anthropology at the Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University.[1] He is best known for his writing on Middle East politics, and as an occasional commentator on U.S. policy in the Middle East.

Education[edit]

Norton is a graduate of the Universities of Miami and Chicago.

Career[edit]

After being commissioned from the ranks in 1967, Norton served two combat tours in Vietnam as an airborne infantry officer. He later served as an unarmed United Nations observer with UNTSO in southern Lebanon. In 1981, he joined the faculty of West Point, where he became a professor of political science. He also taught West Point's only anthropology course. He retired in 1993 with the rank of colonel to join the faculty of Boston University. In 2006 he was an advisor the Iraq Study Group, also known as the Baker-Hamilton Commission.

Bibliography[edit]

Norton has also written, co-authored or edited more than ten books, as well as contributing to leading newspapers and magazines. His books include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Reviewed in Max Rodenbeck, "Lebanon's Agony" The New York Review of Books 54/11 (June 28, 2007) : 10–14

External links[edit]