Austin State Hospital

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Austin State Hospital
Austin state hospital.jpg
The former State Lunatic Asylum is now the administration building for the Austin State Hospital campus.
Location 4110 Guadalupe
Austin, Texas, USA
Coordinates 30°18′26.64″N 97°44′13.92″W / 30.3074000°N 97.7372000°W / 30.3074000; -97.7372000Coordinates: 30°18′26.64″N 97°44′13.92″W / 30.3074000°N 97.7372000°W / 30.3074000; -97.7372000
Built 1857[citation needed]
Architect Charles Payne
Architectural style Classical Revival
NRHP Reference # 87002115
RTHL # 15648
TSAL # 598
Significant dates
Added to NRHP December 4, 1987
Designated RTHL 1966
Designated TSAL 7/20/1999

Austin State Hospital (ASH), formerly known as the Texas State Lunatic Asylum, is a 299-bed psychiatric hospital located in Austin, Texas. It is the oldest psychiatric facility in the state of Texas, and the first hospital of its kind built west of the Mississippi River.[1]

History[edit]

The hospital was established by the Legislature in 1856, and began operating in 1861 with twelve patients.[2]The name was changed in 1925.[3] It's currently operated by the Texas Department of State Health Services.

The Hospital is the subject of a history by Sarah C. Sitton, Life at the Texas State Lunatic Asylum 1857 - 1997, published by the Texas A&M University Press in 1999 as Number 82 in the Centennial Series.[4]

Austin State Hospital's Volunteer Services Council (VSC) is a 501(c)(3) corporation. The VSC conducts fundraiser and donation programs and helps build community awareness about mental illness and the role of Austin State Hospital in the treatment of mental illness.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Services, Texas Department of State Health. "The Texas Department of State Health Services - Austin State Hospital". dshs.texas.gov. Retrieved 2017-04-07. 
  2. ^ G., JOHNSON, JOHN (2010-06-09). "AUSTIN STATE HOSPITAL". tshaonline.org. Retrieved 2017-04-07. 
  3. ^ "Welcome to Austin State Hospital – Over 150 Years of Continued Excellence". 
  4. ^ Sarah C. Sitton. "Life at the Texas State Lunatic Asylum, 1857-1997". 

External links[edit]