Australia at the 1998 Winter Paralympics

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Australia at the
1998 Winter Paralympics
Flag of Australia.svg
IPC code AUS
NPC Australian Paralympic Committee
Website www.paralympic.org.au
in Nagano
Competitors 4 in 1 sport
Flag bearer James Patterson (Opening)[1]
Medals
Ranked 16th
Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 0 1 2
Winter Paralympics appearances (overview)

The 1998 Winter Paralympics were held in Nagano, Japan from the 5–14 March 1998.[2] At these Games, Australia was represented by four male alpine skiers and finished equal 16th (with Denmark) of 21 Nations on the overall medal tally.[3] James Patterson, an LW9 standing skier, won Australia's two medals - one gold and one bronze.[4]

The Team[edit]

Members of the 1998 Australian Winter Paralympic Team were nominated after a series of training camps and competition at the Disabled WinterSport Australia Nationals held in Mt Hotham, Victoria.[5] The team originally consisted of six alpine skiers.

Athlete Classification Events Previous Games Competitive Status
Anthony Bonaccurso LW11 Men's Giant Slalom LW11

Men's Slalom LW11

Men's Super-G LW11

Nil Competed
Rod Hacon LW11/LWXII Did not compete - Injury 1992 Tignes-Albertville

1994 Lillehammer

Withdrew - injury
David Munk LW11/LWXII Did not compete - Illness 1988 Innsbruck

1992 Tignes-Albertville

1994 Lillehammer

Withdrew - illness
Matthew Shane Nicholls LW5/7 Men's Downhill LW1,3,5/7,9

Men's Giant Slalom LW1,3,5/7

Men's Slalom LW6/8

Men's Super-G LW1,3,5/7

Nil Competed
James Lawrence Patterson LW9 Men's Giant Slalom LW9

Men's Super-G LW9

Men's Slalom LW9

Men's Downhill LW1,3,5/7,9

1994 Lillehammer Competed
Alastair Mars LW6/8 Men's Downhill LW6/8

Men's Giant Slalom LW6/8

Men's Slalom LW6/8

Men's Super-G LW6/8

Nil Competed
Rod Hacon, forced to withdraw from Nagano Paralympics due to hand injury.

[4][5]

The team was supported by national head coach Steve Bova and managed by Commander Adrian Pay (RAN).[5]

Games Preparation[edit]

The Australian's began their team training in unsympathetic Australian ski conditions. Once the Australian ski fields proved inadequate for training the team travelled to the northern hemisphere where they spent a significant amount of time training and acclimatising prior to the Nagano Paralympics.[5]

Withdrawals[edit]

It was during this time that both Rod Hacon and David Munk were forced to withdraw from the Australian team. Munk became seriously ill with a kidney infection and Hacon suffered an freak accident, whilst carrying his ski, severely damaging his hand.[5] The injury required surgery and ongoing treatment. Consequently both experienced Paralympic campaigners withdrew from the team prior to the Games. This was a significant blow for the Australian team as they lost two of their most experienced Paralympians who were both well placed to medal at the Games. James Patterson was the only athlete left in the team with previous Paralympics experience. The Australian Winter Paralympic team was reduced to only four athletes, three of whom who'd never before competed at a Winter Paralympics.

Medalists[edit]

Australian Paralympic skier James Patterson at 1994 Paralympic Games
Medal Name Sport Event
 Gold Patterson, JamesJames Patterson Alpine Skiing Men's Downhill LW1,3,5/7,9
 Bronze Patterson, JamesJames Patterson Alpine Skiing Men's Slalom LW9

[4]

James Patterson performed strongly in the blue-ribbon event, the Men's Downhill and eclipsed the opposition,[5] beating New Zealander Mathew Butson to the gold medal by over a second.[4] After two bad races in the Giant Slalom and Super G, Patterson fought back to claim bronze in the Slalom LW9.[5]

Results[edit]

Alpine skiing[edit]

Men
Athlete Event Time Factor % Calculated Factor Rank
Anthony Bonaccurso Men's Giant Slalom LW11 DNF - - -
Men's Slalom LW11 2:57.26 72.63033 2:08.74 17
Men's Super-G LW11 2:07.03 83.15137 1:45.62 20
Matthew Shane Nicholls Men's Downhill LW1,3,5/7,9 1:27.83 97.64023 1:25.75 10
Men's Giant Slalom LW1,3,5/7 3:20.93 98.77309 3:18.46 6
Men's Slalom LW6/8 DNF - - -
Men's Super-G LW1,3,5/7 1:39.37 99.03576 1:38.41 11
James Patterson Men's Giant Slalom LW9 3:07.42 90.84983 2:50.27 4
Men's Super-G LW9 DSQ - - -
Men's Slalom LW9 2:08.01 88.6755 1:53.51 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Men's Downhill LW1,3,5/7,9 1:10.10 95.92812 1:07.24 1st, gold medalist(s)
Alastair Mars Men's Downhill LW6/8 1:12.65 100 1:12.65 16
Men's Giant Slalom LW6/8 DSQ - - -
Men's Slalom LW6/8 DNF - - -
Men's Super-G LW6/8 1:23.64 100 1:23.64 20

[6]

Medal Table[edit]

Australia finished equal 16th (with Denmark) of 21 Nations on the overall medal table.[3] This was lower than the previous two Winter Paralympic games. Australia finished ninth on the table in Lillehammer four years prior (nine medals - three gold, two silver and four bronze)[7] and twelfth in Albertville in 1992 (four medals - one gold, one silver and two bronze).[8]

Map of countries participating in the 1998 Winter Paralympics. Blue = Countries participating for the first time, Green = Countries who have previously participated in a Winter Paralympics, Yellow Square = Host City, Nagano, Japan.
Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Norway Flag of Norway.png 18 9 13 40
2 Germany Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg 14 17 13 44
3 United States of America Flag of the United States.svg 13 8 13 34
4 Japan Flag of Japan bordered.png 12 16 13 41
5 Russia Flag of Russia.svg 12 10 9 31
6 Switzerland Flag of Switzerland within 2to3.svg 10 5 8 23
7 Spain Flag of Spain (WFB 2004).gif 8 0 0 8
8 Austria Flag of Austria (WFB 2004).gif 7 16 11 34
9 Finland Flag of Finland (3-2).svg 7 5 7 19
10 France Flag of France (7x10).svg 5 9 8 22
11 New Zealand Flag of New Zealand (3-2 aspect ratio).svg 4 1 1 6
12 Italy Flag of Italy (Pantone, 2006).svg 3 4 3 10
13 Czech Republic Flag of the Czech Republic.svg 3 3 1 7
14 Ukraine Flag of Ukraine corrected.png 3 2 4 9
15 Canada Flag of Canada (3-2).svg 1 9 5 15
16 Australia Flag of Australia (3-2 aspect ratio).svg 1 0 1 2
Denmark Flag of Denmark (3-2).svg 1 0 1 2

[3] [9]

Impact[edit]

At the conclusion of the games, the Australian Paralympic Committee developed a plan to improve Australia's medal count at the Winter Paralympic Games. The entire winter program was reviewed resulting in a focus on talent identification, continuity of coaching and ongoing, well structured training . A year-round training program was developed to improve physical conditioning for skiing athletes. Funding was secured from the Australian Paralympic Committee, the Australian Sports Commission, and the New South Wales Department of Sport and Recreation.[5][10]

Ron Finneran of WinterSport Australia did a major push to help insure the success of this program. He helped to bring Perisher Blue and Thredbo, two Australian ski resorts, on board to provide training venues, access and support to Australian Paralympic skiers.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Inaugural Central Coast Sporting Wall of Fame - James Patterson". Blue Tongue Stadium Website. Retrieved 22 January 2013. 
  2. ^ "Nagano 1998 Paralympics - Ceremonies, Medals, Torch Relay". www.paralympic.org. Retrieved 2016-08-24. 
  3. ^ a b c Committee, Alexander Picolin, International Paralympic. "IPC Historical Results Archive - MedalStandings Web". db.ipc-services.org. Retrieved 2016-08-24. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Paralympic Results & Historical Records". www.paralympic.org. Retrieved 2016-08-24. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h Australian Paralympic Committee (1998). "1998 APC Annual Report". 1998 APC Annual Report. Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 24 August 2016. 
  6. ^ Committee, Alexander Picolin, International Paralympic. "IPC Historical Results Archive - Competition Web". db.ipc-services.org. Retrieved 2016-08-24. 
  7. ^ Committee, Alexander Picolin, International Paralympic. "IPC Historical Results Archive - MedalStandings Web". db.ipc-services.org. Retrieved 2016-10-05. 
  8. ^ Committee, Alexander Picolin, International Paralympic. "IPC Historical Results Archive - MedalStandings Web". db.ipc-services.org. Retrieved 2016-10-05. 
  9. ^ Brittain, Ian (2014). From Stoke Mandeville to Sochi a history of the summer and winter paralympic games. Illinois: Common Ground Publishing. p. 211. ISBN 9781612294124. 
  10. ^ Australian Paralympic Committee (1999). "1999 APC Annual Report" (PDF). 1999 APC Annual Report. Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 24 August 2016. 
  11. ^ "Sport Australia Hall of Fame - Member Profile". www.sahof.org.au. Retrieved 2016-08-24.