Australia national rugby sevens team

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Australia
Australia national rugby sevens team logo.svg
Founded 1973
Coach(es) Tim Walsh
Captain(s) Jesse Parahi
Team kit
World Cup Sevens
Appearances 6 (First in 1993)
Best result Runner-up (1993, 2001)
Australia vs Spain at the 2013 World Cup 7s

The Australia national rugby sevens team participates in international rugby sevens competitions such as the Sevens World Series and Rugby World Cup Sevens. The current captain of the team is Jesse Parahi, and the head coach is Tim Walsh.

Rugby sevens is now recognised as an Olympic sport and made its debut in the 2016 Summer Olympics. Australia qualified for the tournament after winning the 2015 Oceania Sevens Championship.

Australia also competes at other international tournaments for rugby sevens, including in the Commonwealth Games.

Team name [edit]

The national sevens side is known as Australia and, as confirmed by head coach Andy Friend in an interview with Green and Gold Rugby website,[1] does not have a nickname as of 2016. The team is sometimes erroneously referred to as the Aussie Thunderbolts in sections of the media,[2][3] but that name refers to Australia's developmental sevens side (the second team) rather than the official national team.[1][4]

At the inaugural Hong Kong Sevens tournament in 1976, Australia was represented by a selected team under the name Wallaroos,[5] originally the name of one of the foundation clubs of the Southern Rugby Union in 1874,[6] but now used for the Australian women's team in 15-a-side rugby. Australia has also been represented at international sevens tournaments by the Australian Barbarians club.[7][8]

Tournament record[edit]

A red box around the year indicates tournaments played within Australia
* asterisk indicates a shared placing

World Cup Sevens[edit]

Rugby World Cup 7s
Year Round Position Pld W L D
Scotland 1993 Final 2nd, silver medalist(s) 10 7 3 0
Hong Kong 1997 Quarterfinals  5 * 5 3 1 1
Argentina 2001 Final 2nd, silver medalist(s) 8 7 1 0
Hong Kong 2005 Semifinals  3rd, bronze medalist(s) * 7 5 2 0
United Arab Emirates 2009 Plate final 10 6 3 3 0
Russia 2013 Quarterfinals  5 * 4 2 1 1
United States 2018 Schedule to be confirmed
Total 0 Titles 6/6 40 27 11 2

World Games[edit]

World Games Rugby 7sa
Year Round Position Pld W L D
Japan 2001 Final 2nd, silver medalist(s) 6 5 1 0
Germany 2005 Did not participate
Chinese Taipei 2009
Colombia 2013
Total 0 Titles 1/4 6 5 1 0

Commonwealth Games[edit]

Commonwealth Games 7s
Year Round Position Pld W L D
Malaysia 1998 Third playoff 3rd, bronze medalist(s) 5 4 1 0
England 2002 Quarterfinals  5 * 4 3 1 0
Australia 2006 Third playoff 4 6 3 3 0
India 2010 Final 2nd, silver medalist(s) 6 4 2 0
Scotland 2014 Third playoff 3rd, bronze medalist(s) 6 5 1 0
Australia 2018 Fifth playoff  5  5 4 1 0
England 2022 Schedule to be confirmed
Total 0 Titles 6/6 32 23 9 0

Oceania Sevens[edit]

Oceania Rugby 7s
Year Round Position Pld W L D
Samoa 2008 Did not participate
French Polynesia 2009
Australia 2010 Final 1st, gold medalist(s) 6 6 0 0
Samoa 2011 Third playoff 4 7 4 3 0
Australia 2012 Final 1st, gold medalist(s) 6 6 0 0
Fiji 2013 Third playoff 3rd, bronze medalist(s) 6 4 2 0
Australia 2014 Third playoff 4 6 4 2 0
New Zealand 2015 Final 1st, gold medalist(s) 6 6 0 0
Fiji 2016 Third playoff 3rd, bronze medalist(s) 6 4 2 0
Fiji 2017 Third playoff 3rd, bronze medalist(s) 4 3 1 0
Total 3 Titles 8/10 47 37 10 0

Summer Olympic Games Record[edit]

World Rugby Sevens Series[edit]

Key to tournament locations
Africa and Middle East
Asia
Americas
Europe
Oceania Australian event 

2000s[edit]

Summary for Series I to X
World Sevens Series
I
99–00
II
00–01
III
01–02
IV
02–03
V
03–04
 
5th
Dubai
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Dubai
  no status** Dubai 3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Dubai
6th
Dubai
5th
Stellenbosch
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Durban
5th
Durban
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
George
7th*
George
 
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Wellington
1st, gold medalist(s)st
Wellington
7th*
Wellington
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Wellington
10th
Wellington
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
Brisbane
cancelled Brisbane 1st, gold medalist(s)st
Brisbane
5th
Brisbane
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Suva
 
5th
Punta del Este
7th*
Santiago
9th
Los Angeles
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Mar del Plata
 – 5th
Mar del Plata
 
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Hong Kong
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Hong Kong
5th*
Hong Kong
5th*
Hong Kong
5th*
Hong Kong
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Tokyo
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
Tokyo
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Singapore
cancelled §
Singapore
7th*
Singapore
1st, gold medalist(s)st
Shanghai
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Beijing
cancelled §
Beijing
1st, gold medalist(s)st
Kuala Lumpur
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Kuala Lumpur
 
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
London
5th
London
5th
London
7th*
London
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Paris
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
Cardiff
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Cardiff
6th
Cardiff
6th
Bordeaux
 
10/10
118 pts

Bronze medal icon.svgrd [9]

9/9
150 pts

Silver medal icon.svgnd [10]

10/10
108 pts

5th [11]

7/7
66 pts

5th [12]

8/8
34 pts

8th [13]

 Notes:
* Shared placing (play-off matches for third were eventually introduced in 2012).
** Downgraded to non-series status in wake of September 11 attacks in 2001.
Mar del Plata hosted the Sevens World Cup instead of a leg in the 2001 series.
Tournament cancelled by IRB in response to government sanctions against Fiji.
§ Tournament cancelled due to concerns about the SARS outbreak in Asia in 2002.
IRB Sevens World Series
VI
04–05
VII
05–06
VIII
06–07
IX
07–08
X
08–09
 
7th*
Dubai
7th*
Dubai
7th*
Dubai
9th
Dubai
7th*
Dubai
9th
George
7th*
George
9th
George
11th*
George
10th
George
 
5th
Wellington
7th*
Wellington
11th*
Wellington
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Wellington
11th*
Wellington
5th
Adelaide
7th*
Adelaide
6th
Adelaide
 
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Los Angeles
7th*
Los Angeles
7th*
San Diego
12th
San Diego
9th
San Diego
 
 – 5th*
Hong Kong
5th*
Hong Kong
5th*
Hong Kong
5th*
Hong Kong
6th
Singapore
7th*
Singapore
 
6th
London
11th*
London
6th
London
9th
London
7th*
London
7th*
Paris
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Paris
11th*
Edinburgh
9th
Edinburgh
6th
Edinburgh
 
7/7
42 pts

7th [14]

8/8
40 pts

8th [15]

8/8
32 pts

7th [16]

8/8
30 pts

8th [17]

8/8
30 pts

8th [18]

 Notes:
* Shared placing (play-off matches for third were eventually introduced in 2012).
Hong Kong hosted the Sevens World Cup instead of a leg in the 2005 series.




2010s[edit]

Summary for Series XI to XX
World Sevens Series
XI
09–10
XII
10–11
XIII
11–12
XIV
12–13
XV
13–14
 
5th
Dubai
6th
Dubai
5th
Dubai
15th*
Dubai
9th
Dubai
7th*
George
7th*
George
7th*
Port Elizabeth
9th
Port Elizabeth
10th
Port Elizabeth
 
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Adelaide
7th*
Adelaide
4th
Gold Coast
7th*
Gold Coast
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
Gold Coast
5th
Wellington
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Wellington
10th
Wellington
5th
Wellington
5th
Wellington
 
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd*
Las Vegas
7th*
Las Vegas
10th
Las Vegas
13th
Las Vegas
6th
Las Vegas
cancelled
Mar Del Plata
 
5th
Hong Kong
6th
Hong Kong
7th*
Hong Kong
7th*
Hong Kong
4th
Hong Kong
1st, gold medalist(s)st
Tokyo
7th*
Tokyo
5th
Tokyo
 
1st, gold medalist(s)st
London
6th
London
5th
London
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
London
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
London
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
Edinburgh
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
Edinburgh
5th
Glasgow
9th
Glasgow
7th*
Glasgow
 
8/8
122 pts

Bronze medal icon.svgrd [19]

8/8
80 pts

5th [20]

9/9
110 pts

6th [21]

9/9
89 pts

8th [22]

9/9
116 pts

5th [23]

 Notes:
* Shared placing (play-off matches for third were introduced in 2012).
World 7s component cancelled due to demands on UAR joining The Rugby Championship.
World Rugby Sevens Series
XVI
14–15
XVII
15–16
XVIII
16–17
XIX
17–18
XX
18–19
 
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
Dubai
6th
Dubai
5th
Dubai
5th
Dubai
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd
Port Elizabeth
7th*
Cape Town
11th*
Cape Town
9th
Cape Town
 
7th*
Gold Coast
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
Sydney
4th
Sydney
1st, gold medalist(s)st
Sydney
6th
Wellington
5th
Wellington
10th
Wellington
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd
Hamilton
 
5th
Las Vegas
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
Las Vegas
6th
Las Vegas
6th
Las Vegas
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd
Vancouver
7th*
Vancouver
6th
Vancouver
 
5th
Hong Kong
4th
Hong Kong
3rd, bronze medalist(s)rd
Hong Kong
11th*
Hong Kong
9th
Tokyo
7th*
Singapore
4th
Singapore
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
Singapore
 
2nd, silver medalist(s)nd
London
10th
London
6th
London
7th*
London
7th*
Glasgow
6th
Paris
10th
Paris

Paris
 
9/9
120 pts

5th [24]

10/10
134 pts

4th [25]

10/10
113 pts

6th [26]

9/10
118 pts

4th


 Notes:
* Shared placing (play-off matches for third were introduced in 2012).
: World 7s component cancelled

Honours[edit]

Team[edit]

Current squad[edit]

Coaches[edit]

The current head coach is Tim Walsh, who took charge in April 2018.[27]

Name Tenure Ref
Tim Walsh 2018–present [27]
Jarred Hodges 2018  (interim) [28]
Andy Friend 2016–2018 [29]
Scott Bowen 2015–16 (interim) [30]
Tim Walsh 2015  (interim) [31]
Geraint John 2014–15
Michael O'Connor 2008–14 [32]

Captains[edit]

  • TBC – 2017

Previous squads[edit]

The following is the Australia roster in the men's rugby sevens tournament of the 2016 Summer Olympics.[36] Tom Kingston replaced injured Lewis Holland after he injured his hamstring on Day 1.[37]

Head coach: Andy Friend

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Events Points Union
1 FW Nick Malouf (1993-03-19)19 March 1993 (aged 23) 22 175 Australia University of Queensland
2 FW Jesse Parahi (1989-07-29)29 July 1989 (aged 27) 35 125 Australia Northern Suburbs
3 BK Henry Hutchison (1997-02-12)12 February 1997 (aged 19) 7 135 Australia Randwick
4 BK Lewis Holland (1993-01-14)14 January 1993 (aged 23) 31 469 Australia Queanbeyan Whites
5 BK James Stannard (1983-02-21)21 February 1983 (aged 33) 31 794 Australia Souths
6 FW Con Foley (1992-09-19)19 September 1992 (aged 23) 42 309 Australia University of Queensland
7 BK Cameron Clark (1993-03-20)20 March 1993 (aged 23) 30 632 Australia Northern Suburbs
8 FW Pat McCutcheon (1987-06-24)24 June 1987 (aged 29) 14 100 Australia Sydney University
9 FW Ed Jenkins (c) (1986-05-26)26 May 1986 (aged 30) 45 522 Australia Sydney University
10 FW Allan Fa'alava'au (1993-12-15)15 December 1993 (aged 22) 28 257 Australia Endeavour Hills
11 BK John Porch (1994-03-04)4 March 1994 (aged 22) 5 62 Australia Northern Suburbs
12 FW Tom Cusack (1993-03-01)1 March 1993 (aged 23) 15 60 Australia Canberra Royals
13 BK Tom Kingston (1991-06-19)19 June 1991 (aged 25) 9 45 Australia Sydney Stars

2013–14 Sevens World Series[edit]

2010–11 Sevens World Series[edit]

2010 Commonwealth Games[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

^a Rugby Sevens was discontinued at the World Games after 2013 due to the sport returning to the Olympics in 2016.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Matt Rowley (10 May 2016). "Podcast 209: 7s Masterclass with Andy Friend". Green and Gold Rugby (Podcast). Event occurs at 18:38 to 19:26. Archived from the original on 16 May 2016. Retrieved 16 May 2016. 
  2. ^ Aussie men in rugby seven's heaven
  3. ^ Spiro Zavos (6 February 2012). "How the Australian Sevens side can live up to its 'Aussie Thunderbolts' nickname". The Roar. 
  4. ^ "Aussie Thunderbolts Win Plate Final In Fiji". Australian Rugby. 21 January 2013. Archived from the original on 16 May 2016. Retrieved 16 May 2016. 
  5. ^ "Thomas in the Wallaroos". The Canberra Times. 11 March 1976. p. 24. Retrieved 16 May 2016. 
  6. ^ "Football Conference". The Sydney Mail. 27 June 1874. p.182 col.1–2. Retrieved 16 May 2016. 
  7. ^ "Youngsters may get Hong Kong chance". The Canberra Times. 11 March 1994. p. 28. Retrieved 16 May 2016. 
  8. ^ Growden, Greg (25 February 1995). "Mix-up in dates presents a poser for Ella". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax. Archived from the original on 16 May 2016. Retrieved 16 May 2016. 
  9. ^ "2000 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  10. ^ "2001 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  11. ^ "2002 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  12. ^ "2003 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  13. ^ "2004 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  14. ^ "2005 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  15. ^ "2006 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  16. ^ "2007 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  17. ^ "2008 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  18. ^ "2009 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  19. ^ "2010 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  20. ^ "2011 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  21. ^ "2012 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  22. ^ "2013 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  23. ^ "2014 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  24. ^ "2015 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  25. ^ "2016 IRB Sevens Standings". Rugby7. 
  26. ^ "World Series Standings". World Rugby. 2017. Archived from the original on 21 May 2017. Retrieved 21 May 2017. 
  27. ^ a b "Aussie women lose coach to men". The Daily Examiner. Grafton. 19 March 2018. Archived from the original on 17 April 2018. Retrieved 19 March 2018. 
  28. ^ a b "Australia to field youthful men's lineup at 2018 Hong Kong Sevens". news.com.au. 6 April 2018. Archived from the original on 17 April 2018. Retrieved 17 April 2018. 
  29. ^ "Andy Friend appointed Qantas Australian Men's Sevens coach". ARU. 5 January 2016. Archived from the original on 5 January 2016. Retrieved 5 January 2016. 
  30. ^ Men's Sevens finish seventh in Cape Town
  31. ^ Browning, Jennifer (7 September 2015). "Australia's men's rugby sevens coach confident of qualifying for Rio Olympics despite upheaval". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on 8 September 2015. Retrieved 8 September 2015. 
  32. ^ "ARU appoints Geraint John as new Qantas Men's Sevens Head Coach". Australian Rugby. 27 May 2014. Archived from the original on 26 June 2014. Retrieved 26 June 2014. 
  33. ^ "Parahi wants to do sidelined skippers proud". rugby.com.au. 4 April 2018. Archived from the original on 17 April 2018. Retrieved 17 April 2018. 
  34. ^ "Men's Sevens: All in the family for Caslicks". Australian Rugby. 25 November 2016. Archived from the original on 26 November 2016. 
  35. ^ "Ed Jenkins relinquishes Australia men's sevens captaincy". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax. 26 October 2015. Archived from the original on 26 November 2016. 
  36. ^ "Rio 2016: Olympic squads named by Australia for rugby sevens debut at Games". ABC News. 14 July 2016. Retrieved 19 July 2016. 
  37. ^ Payten, Iain (10 August 2016). "Star playmaker Lewis Holland ruled out of remaining games as Aussie campaign derails". Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 10 August 2016. 
  38. ^ Qantas Men's Sevens Squad Archived 6 February 2015 at the Wayback Machine.
  39. ^ "Qantas Men's Sevens Squad". Australian Rugby. 2015. Archived from the original on 6 February 2015. 
  40. ^ IRB (16 July 2014). "Commonwealth Games Sevens squads: Latest". Retrieved 24 July 2014. 

External links[edit]