Australia women's national cricket team

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Australia
Australia vs England in the second women's Test match in Sydney, 1935.
Australia vs England in the second women's Test match in Sydney, 1935.
Captain Meg Lanning
First recorded match 28 December 1934 v England at Brisbane Exhibition Ground, Brisbane, Australia
World Cup
Appearances 8 (First in 1973)
Best result Winners, 1978, 1982, 1988, 1997, 2005 and 2013
Test matches
Test matches played 67
Test wins/losses 18/9
ODI matches
ODI matches played 223
ODIs wins/losses 175/43
As of 12 March 2009

The Australian women's cricket team (nicknamed the Southern Stars) are Australia's national women's cricket team. The team is currently captained by Meg Lanning and coached by former Victoria and Queensland batsmen Matthew Mott[1]

The team played their first Test match in 1934/5, when they lost to England two-nil in a three-Test series. They now compete against England for the Women's Ashes. They have won more World Cups than any other side — winning in 1978, 1982, 1988, 1997, 2005 and 2013. The team has also be crowned champions of the ICC Women's World Twenty20 tournament more than any other side - winning in 2010, 2012 and 2014.

One of the most remarkable families in the early history of the team were the Shevill sisters. Fernie Blade (née Shevill) played against England in the first Test at Brisbane in 1934–35, and her twin Rene Shevill appeared in the next two. Another sister, Essie Shevill, played in all three of those matches, and her twin Lily Shevill also played for New South Wales.

In 2003 the then Women's Cricket Australia (WCA), and the then Australia Cricket board (ACB) merged to form a 1 national cricket board which is now known as, Cricket Australia which remains to this day. This merger in boards has been a positive influence on Women's Cricket as it has provided more financial support, while also gathering more exposure for Women's Cricket[2]

Former Captain Belinda Clark has been one of the most influential figures in Australian Women's Cricket history. In a career spanning 14 years She was the captain of the National Women's team while also contributing in an off field role as the chief executive of Women's Cricket Australia. In 2014 Belinda Clark was inducted into the Australian Cricket Hall of Fame alongside Male Cricketer Mark Waugh[3]

Tournament history[edit]

World Cup record
Year Round Position GP W L T NR
England 1973 Second Place 2/7 6 4 1 0 1
India 1978 Champions 1/4 3 3 0 0 0
New Zealand 1982 Champions 1/5 13 12 0 1 0
Australia 1988 Champions 1/5 9 8 1 0 0
England 1993 Round 1 3/8 7 5 2 0 0
India 1997 Champions 1/12 8 7 0 0 1
New Zealand 2000 Second Place 2/8 9 8 1 0 0
South Africa 2005 Champions 1/8 9 7 0 0 2
Australia 2009 Super Sixes 4/8 7 4 3 0 0
India 2013 Champions 1/8 7 6 1 0 0
Total 6 Titles 10/10 78 64 9 1 4
World Twenty20 record
Year Round Position GP W L T NR
England 2009 Semi-finals 3/8 4 2 2 0 0
West Indies Cricket Board 2010 Champions 1/8 5 5 0 0 0
Sri Lanka 2012 Champions 1/8 5 4 1 0 0
Bangladesh 2014 Champions 1/10 6 5 1 0 0
Total 3 Titles 4/4 20 16 4 0 0

Current team[edit]

As of 31 January 2015,[4] the Australian national women's contracted players are:

Records[edit]

Test cricket[edit]

ODI cricket[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ West, Keesha. "Mott Named New Southern Stars Coach". www.cricket.com.au. cricket.com.au. Retrieved 24 March 2015. 
  2. ^ Stronach, Megan; Adair, Darryl (8 September 2009). "Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics". Brave new world’ or ‘sticky wicket’? Women, management and organizational power in Cricket Australia 12 (7): 910, 932. doi:10.1080/17430430903053174. 
  3. ^ . ESPN Cricinfo http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/player/53413.html. Retrieved 2005.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. ^ http://www.cricketaustralia.com.au/cricket/contracted-player-list

External links[edit]