Results of the Australian federal election, 2004 (Senate)

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The following tables show state-by-state results in the Australian Senate at the 2004 federal election. Senators total 37 coalition (33 Liberal, three coalition National, one CLP), 28 Labor, three Green, one Family First, two non-coalition National and four Democrats.[1][2] Senator terms are six years (three for territories), and took their seats from 1 July 2005, except the territories who took their seats immediately.

Preference deals[edit]

The Greens directed preferences to the Democrats and Labor ahead of the Coalition, Family First and the Christian Democrats. In exchange, the Democrats preferenced the Greens ahead of both major parties and Labor preferenced the Greens and Democrats first in every state and territory except for Tasmania, where Labor preferenced Family First ahead of the Greens and Democrats, and Victoria, where Labor preferenced Family First, Democratic Labor and the Christian Democrats ahead of the Greens and the Democrats.

The Family First Party preferenced the Democrats and the Christian Democrats ahead of both major parties. In exchange, the Democrats preferenced Family First ahead of both the Greens and both major parties, while the Christian Democrats also preferenced Family First highly. The Family First Party and the Coalition also preferenced each other ahead of Labor and the Greens.

One Nation was preferenced last by Labor, the Democrats, the Coalition and the Greens in every state, while the Greens was preferenced last by Family First, One Nation and the Christian Democrats in every state.

A full listing of preferences can be found here [1]

Australia[edit]

Senate (STV GV) — Turnout 94.82% (CV) — Informal 3.75%[3][4]
Party Votes % Swing Seats won Total seats Change
  Liberal/National Coalition 5,226,853 43.72 +3.80 20 37 +3
  Australian Labor Party 4,186,715 35.02 +0.70 16 28 -1
  Australian Greens 916,431 7.67 +2.73 2 4 +2
  Australian Democrats 250,373 2.09 -5.16 0 4 -4
  Family First Party 210,567 1.76 +1.76 1 1 +1
  One Nation 206,455 1.73 -3.81 0 0 -1
  National Party of Australia (Qld, WA) 163,261 1.37 -0.55 1 2 +1
  Christian Democratic Party 140,674 1.18 +0.06 0 0 0
  liberals for forests 107,130 0.90 +0.15 0 0 0
  Democratic Labor Party 58,042 0.49 −0.08 0 0 0
  The Fishing Party 50,356 0.42 +0.18 0 0 0
  Help End Marijuana Prohibition 41,501 0.35 −0.20 0 0 0
  Ex-Service, Service and Veterans Party 25,277 0.21 +0.21 0 0 0
  Citizens Electoral Council 24,663 0.21 +0.14 0 0 0
  Lower Excise Fuel and Beer Party 19,156 0.16 −0.04 0 0 0
  Australian Progressive Alliance 18,856 0.16 +0.16 0 0 0
  Progressive Labour Party 18,424 0.15 −0.50 0 0 0
  The Aged and Disability Pensioners Party 17,401 0.15 +0.15 0 0 0
  Outdoor Recreation Party 13,822 0.12 +0.12 0 0 0
  Socialist Alliance 13,305 0.11 +0.11 0 0 0
  Non-Custodial Parents Party 12,207 0.10 +0.06 0 0 0
  Australians Against Further Immigration 11,508 0.10 −0.08 0 0 0
  New Country Party 11,040 0.09 +0.09 0 0 0
  No GST Party 9,713 0.08 −0.35 0 0 0
  The Great Australians 6,984 0.06 +0.06 0 0 0
  Republican Party of Australia 4,168 0.03 −0.06 0 0 0
  Save the ADI Site Party 3,281 0.03 +0.03 0 0 0
  Hope Party Australia 2,938 0.02 −0.01 0 0 0
  Nuclear Disarmament Party 2,163 0.02 −0.02 0 0 0
  Other 180,385 1.51 +1.13 0 0 -1
  Total 11,953,649     40 76

New South Wales[edit]

Australian federal election, 2004: Senate, New South Wales
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Quota 567,796
Liberal/National Coalition 1. Bill Heffernan (Lib) (elected 1)
2. Concetta Fierravanti-Wells (Lib) (elected 3)
3. Fiona Nash (Nat) (elected 5)
4. John Tierney (Lib)
5. Michael Darby (Lib)
6. Robyn Bain (Nat)
1,753,507 44.12 +2.36
Labor 1. Steve Hutchins (elected 2)
2. John Faulkner (elected 4)
3. Michael Forshaw (elected 6)
4. Joanna Woods
1,445,602 36.37 +2.87
Greens 1. John Kaye
2. Carol Berry
3. Ben Oquist
4. Susie Russell
5. Trish Mullins
6. Jeremy Buckingham
291,845 7.34 +2.98
Christian Democrats 1. Fred Nile
2. Patricia Giles
3. Peter Walker
4. Kevin Hume
5. George Capsis
103,831 2.61 +0.74
Democrats 1. Aden Ridgeway
2. Nina Burridge
3. Greg Butler
87,377 2.20 -4.01
One Nation 1. Judith Newson
2. Lynn Stanfield
3. Peter Bussa
75,284 1.89 -3.69
HEMP 1. Michael Balderstone
2. Graham Askey
24,016 0.60 -0.32
Family First 1. Joan Woods
2. Ivan Herald
22,210 0.56 +0.56
Fishing Party 1. Bob Smith
2. David Hitchcock
21,322 0.54 -0.17
liberals for forests 1. Glenn Druery
2. Ruth Green
21,197 0.53 +0.53
Lower Excise Fuel 1. Dave O'Loughlin
2. Derek Ridgley
19,156 0.48 -0.13
Outdoor Recreation 1. Leon Belgrave
2. Janos Beregszaszi
13,822 0.35 +0.35
1. David Ettridge
2. Ashley Ettridge
13,635 0.34 +0.34
Progressive Labour 1. Klaas Woldring
2. Kate Ferguson
13,175 0.33 -1.44
Veterans 1. Bruce Howlett
2. Bonnie Fraser
3. Trevor Hesse
12,905 0.32 +0.32
AAFI 1. David Kitson
2. Edwin Woodger
11,508 0.29 -0.25
No GST 1. Mick Gallagher
2. Warwick Mead
9,713 0.24 -0.42
New Country 1. Greg Graham
2. Lisa de Meur
6,218 0.16 +0.16
Great Australians 1. Brett McHolme
2. Dennis Robinson
4,691 0.12 +0.12
Socialist Alliance 1. Kylie Moon
2. Ray Jackson
4,241 0.11 +0.11
Save the ADI Site 1. Geoff Brown
2. Bernie Laughlan
3,281 0.08 +0.08
Non-Custodial Parents 1. Grahame Marks
2. Andrew Thompson
2,930 0.07 -0.03
1. Martin Zitek
Robert Zitek
2,750 0.07 +0.07
CEC 1. Robert Butler
2. Richard Witten
2,471 0.06 +0.00
Progressive Alliance 1. Reese Malcolm
2. Lee Raper
2,342 0.06 +0.06
Nuclear Disarmament 1. Michael Denborough
2. Yvonne Francis
2,163 0.05 -0.07
1. James Harker-Mortlock
2. Kelly Ferguson
1,637 0.04 +0.04
Independent John Thompson 549 0.01 +0.01
1. Tom Vogelgesang
2. Don Nguyen
538 0.01 +0.01
Independent Paul Simpson 251 0.01 +0.01
Independent Carole Carpenter 208 0.01 +0.01
1. Nick Beams
2. Terry Cook
116 0.00 +0.00
Independent Jack Lord 74 0.00 +0.01
Total formal votes 3,974,565 96.53 +0.07
Informal votes 143,021 3.47 -0.07
Turnout 4,117,586 95.11 -0.38

The primary vote saw the Coalition winning three seats and Labor winning two, leaving the Greens and Labor leading the Christian Democrats for the final seat. Preferences from liberals for forests, Family First, the Democrats and One Nation meant that the Christian Democrats ended up overtaking both Labor and the Greens for the final vacancy, but Labor managed to stay ahead of the Greens, meaning that Labor ending up taking the final seat using Green preferences. The result was three seats coalition and three seats Labor.[5]

Victoria[edit]

Australian federal election, 2004: Senate, Victoria
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Quota 428,085
Liberal/National Coalition 1. Michael Ronaldson (Lib) (elected 1)
2. Julian McGauran (Nat) (elected 3)
3. Judith Troeth (Lib) (elected 5)
4. Dino De Marchi (Lib)
5. Jim Forbes (Lib)
6. Eugene Notermans (Lib)
1,321,445 44.10 +4.49
Labor 1. Kim Carr (elected 2)
2. Stephen Conroy (elected 4)
3. Jacinta Collins
4. Marg Lewis
1,082,271 36.12 -0.67
Greens 1. David Risstrom
2. Richard Di Natale
3. Pamela Curr
4. Liz Conor
5. Sue Pennicuik
6. Berhan Ahmed
263,551 8.80 +2.81
Democratic Labor 1. John Mulholland
2. Pat Crea
3. Gail King
4. Rosemary Maurus
5. Ken Wells
58,042 1.94 -0.34
Family First 1. Steve Fielding (elected 6)
2. Danny Nalliah
3. Annette Blaze
4. Allan Meyer
5. Ann Bown
56,376 1.88 +1.88
Democrats 1. Jess Healy
2. Greg Chipp
3. Tony Inglese
4. Jo McCubbin
55,867 1.86 -5.96
liberals for forests 1. Steve Clancy
2. Rad Wintle
55,170 1.84 -0.56
One Nation 1. Tim Foster
2. James Neary
21,532 0.72 -1.73
Pensioners 1. Graeme Cleaves
2. Ian Kleeman
17,401 0.58 +0.58
CEC 1. Craig Isherwood
2. Kelly-Ann Paull
16,227 0.54 +0.45
Christian Democrats 1. Alan Barron
2. Phil Seymour
10,239 0.34 -0.25
Veterans 1. Roger Tozer
2. Pam Brown
8,601 0.29 +0.29
1. Richard Frankland
2. Peter Phelps
3. John Harding
7,266 0.24 +0.24
Socialist Alliance 1. Lalitha Chelliah
2. Sue Bolton
4,906 0.16 +0.16
Republican 1. Peter Consandine
2. Sheila Newman
4,168 0.14 +0.14
1. Joseph Toscano
2. Steven Reghenzani
3,418 0.11 +0.11
Non-Custodial Parents 1. Kevin Boers
2. Brendan Hall
3,310 0.11 +0.11
Hope 1. Tim Petherbridge
2. Lee-Anne Poynton
2,938 0.10 +0.01
Progressive Alliance 1. Chris Grigsby
2. Charles Williams
2,453 0.08 +0.08
Independent Phillip Mason 478 0.02 +0.02
Independent Che Endra Che-Kahn 212 0.01 +0.01
Independent Harald Dreger 192 0.01 +0.01
Independent Judi-ann Leggetts 168 0.01 +0.01
Independent Barry Walters 161 0.01 +0.01
Independent David Buck 80 0.00 +0.00
Independent Glenn Floyd 71 0.00 +0.00
Independent John Tibble 51 0.00 +0.00
Total formal votes 2,996,594 94.87 +0.47
Informal votes 162,047 5.13 -0.47
Turnout 3,158,641 95.43 -0.61

Primary votes ensured that the Coalition secured three senate seats and Labor secured two. This left the Greens leading with Labor not far behind as preferences began counting. In an attempt to protect their third candidate, Jacinta Collins, Labor made a deal with several groups including the Democratic Labor Party, Family First Party and the Christian Democrats where they would preference her ahead of the Coalition in exchange for Labor preferences, expecting them to be eliminated before these preferences could be distributed. However, it backfired badly as the Family First Party, despite starting with less than two percent of the primary vote, received many preferences from the Christian Democrats, the Aged and Disability Pensioners Party, One Nation, the Coalition, liberals for forests, the Australian Democrats and the Democratic Labor Party that easily put Family First ahead of Labor. And, as per the Jacinta Collins deal, the majority of the Labor preferences went to Family First too, meaning that Steve Fielding was comfortably elected ahead of Greens candidate David Risstrom. The result was three seats Coalition, two seats Labor and one seat Family First.[6]

Queensland[edit]

Australian federal election, 2004: Senate, Queensland
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Quota 323,611
Liberal 1. Brett Mason (elected 1)
2. George Brandis (elected 3)
3. Russell Trood (elected 6)
4. Sue Boyce
867,276 38.29 +3.39
Labor 1. Jan McLucas (elected 2)
2. Joe Ludwig (elected 4)
3. Frank Gilbert
717,005 36.12 -0.08
National 1. Barnaby Joyce (elected 5)
2. James Baker
3. Stewart Gillies
149,719 6.61 -2.55
Greens 1. Drew Hutton
2. Sarah Moles
3. Theresa Millard
122,393 5.40 +2.09
Group K 1. Pauline Hanson
2. Judy Smith
102,824 4.54 +4.54
Family First 1. John Lewis
2. Tracy Skellern-Smith
76,309 3.37 +3.37
One Nation 1. Len Harris
2. Ian Nelson
3. James Savage
71,043 3.14 -6.88
Democrats 1. John Cherry
2. Bonny Bauer
49,898 2.20 -4.49
Fishing Party 1. Kevin Collins
2. Darryl Whitford
29,034 1.28 +1.28
liberals for forests 1. Joseph Clark
2. Archie Chapman
22,283 0.98 +0.98
HEMP 1. Guy Freemarijuana
2. Tony Kneipp
17,485 0.77 -0.54
Group O 1. Hetty Johnston
2. Diana Scott
15,596 0.69 +0.69
Group A 1. Terry Rushton
2. Eamon Coll
5,152 0.23 +0.23
Non-Custodial Parents 1. Geoff Webster
2. Doug Thompson
4,226 0.19 +0.19
CEC 1. Maurice Hetherington
2. Ray Gillham
3,359 0.15 +0.05
New Country 1. Lorraine Wheeldon
2. Rowell Walton
2,841 0.13 +0.13
Socialist Alliance 1. Sam Watson
2. Nicole Clevens
2,334 0.10 +0.10
Great Australians 1. John Rivett
2. Mal McKenzie
2,293 0.10 +0.10
Group D 1. Selwyn Johnston
2. Susan Harvey
1,408 0.06 +0.06
Group G 1. Gail Duncan
2. Kim McIntosh
1,015 0.04 +0.04
Progressive Alliance 1. Tony Newman
2. Darrell Morris
921 0.04 +0.04
Independent Darryl McArthur 568 0.03 +0.03
Independent Hassan Ghulam 295 0.01 +0.01
Total formal votes 2,265,274 97.21 +0.16
Informal votes 65,037 2.79 -0.16
Turnout 2,330,311 94.13 -1.10

Primary votes saw two Labor and two Liberal senators get elected, leaving the Liberal Party well ahead of the National Party, the Greens and former One Nation leader Pauline Hanson, who this election ran as an independent. Pauline Hanson attracted a lot of preferential votes, which meant that her former party was surprisingly excluded before she was. This meant that her preferences could not go to One Nation and threaten the Liberal and National parties. As such, the National Party, using Fishing Party preferences, won the fifth seat and the Liberals won the sixth seat. The result was three seats Liberal, two seats Labor and one seat National.[7]

Western Australia[edit]

Australian federal election, 2004: Senate, Western Australia
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Quota 161,166
Liberal 1. Chris Ellison (elected 1)
2. Ian Campbell (elected 3)
3. Judith Adams (elected 5)
4. Michelle Steck
556,558 49.34 +9.21
Labor 1. Chris Evans (elected 2)
2. Glenn Sterle (elected 4)
3. Emiliano Barzotto
366,825 32.52 -1.63
Greens 1. Rachel Siewert (elected 6)
2. Colin Hughes
3. Christopher Newall
4. Felicity Peterson
90,956 8.06 +8.06
One Nation 1. James Hopkinson
2. Ron McLean
27,601 2.45 -4.58
Democrats 1. Brian Greig
2. Dominika Lisowski
3. Jason Meotti
22,603 2.00 -3.86
Christian Democrats 1. Lachlan Dunjey
2. Peter Watt
3. Norman Gage
21,234 1.88 +0.63
National 1. Geoff Gill
2. Norm Henning
9,699 0.86 -1.49
Family First 1. Nigel Irvine
2. Don Hatch
9,553 0.85 +0.85
liberals for forests 1. Lesley McKay
2. Vicki Taylor
5,680 0.50 -0.92
Progressive Labour 1. Mary Lupi
2. Lyn Kearsley
5,249 0.47 -0.22
Group A 1. Alicia Curtis
2. Steven Ogle
4,122 0.37 +0.37
CEC 1. Jean Robertson
2. Stuart Smith
2,098 0.19 +0.08
New Country 1. Mal Harrington
2. Brendan Mansell
1,981 0.18 +0.18
Non-Custodial Parents 1. Brian Taylor
2. Geoff Dixon
1,741 0.15 +0.15
Progressive Alliance 1. Geoff Gibson
2. Stephen Crabbe
932 0.08 +0.08
Independent Julie Easton 1,015 0.09 +0.09
Independent Jim Jardine 146 0.01 +0.01
Independent Alexander Marsden 132 0.01 +0.01
Total formal votes 1,128,155 96.46 +0.35
Informal votes 41,452 3.54 -0.04
Turnout 1,169,607 93.66 -1.38

Primary votes saw three Liberal and two Labor senators get elected, leaving the Greens with a sizeable lead against the Liberals. Preferences from the Democrats and Labor saw that lead extended even further, and Greens candidate Rachel Siewert comfortably took the final vacancy. The result was three seats Liberal, two seats Labor and one seat Greens. [8]

South Australia[edit]

Australian federal election, 2004: Senate, South Australia
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Quota 138,249
Liberal 1. Nick Minchin (elected 1)
2. Amanda Vanstone (elected 3)
3. Alan Ferguson (elected 5)
4. Sue Lawrie
459,560 47.49 +1.94
Labor 1. Anne McEwen (elected 2)
2. Annette Hurley (elected 4)
3. Dana Wortley (elected 6)
343,422 35.49 +2.25
Greens 1. Brian Noone
2. Clare McCarty
3. Mij Tanith
4. Sandy Montgomery
63,881 6.60 +3.15
Family First 1. Andrea Mason
2. Tony Bates
3. Toni Turnbull
38,559 3.98 +3.98
Democrats 1. John McLaren
2. Ruth Russell
3. Tammy Franks
4. Jenny Scott
23,118 2.39 -10.23
Progressive Alliance 1. Meg Lees
2. Kirk Jones
3. Jenny Macintosh
11,061 1.14 +1.14
One Nation 1. Andrew Phillips
2. Basil Hille
10,995 1.14 -3.42
National 1. John Venus
2. Julie Sippo
3. Ian Willcourt
3,843 0.40 +0.40
Veterans 1. Nicholas McShane
2. Jarrad Kay
3,771 0.39 +0.39
liberals for forests 1. Rita Hunt
2. Rachael Barons
2,800 0.29 +0.29
Group A 1. Rolf Klotz
2. Mark Smith
3. Robyn Munro
4. Ivan May
1,957 0.20 +0.20
Socialist Alliance 1. Tom Burtuleit
2. Amy McDonald
1,255 0.13 +0.13
Group M 1. Ben Yengi
2. Alan Hutton
890 0.09 +0.09
Group P 1. Ralph Hahnheuser
2. Benno Lang
889 0.09 +0.09
Group C 1. Andrew Stanko
2. Damian Woodards
657 0.07 +0.07
Independent Richard Armour 437 0.05 +0.05
Group B 1. Kane Winther
2. Claire Winther
402 0.04 +0.04
Independent John Lawrie 126 0.01 +0.01
Independent Richard Lutz 115 0.01 +0.01
Total formal votes 967,738 96.47 -0.47
Informal votes 35,424 3.53 +0.47
Turnout 1,003,162 95.36 -0.86

Primary votes saw three Liberal seats and two Labor seats secured. With South Australia being the former constituent of former Democrats leader now Progressive Alliance leader Meg Lees, the state saw the largest swing against the Democrats and the largest total for the Progressive Alliance. ABC Election Analyst Antony Green suggested that had the Democrats done better in the primary vote in South Australia, they may have won the final senate seat on Family First preferences. Instead, the Democrat preferences saw Family First go ahead of the Greens, leading to Labor winning the seat on Green prefences. The result was three seats Liberal and three seats Labor.[9]

Tasmania[edit]

Australian federal election, 2004: Senate, Tasmania
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Quota 45,382
Liberal 1. Eric Abetz (elected 1)
2. Guy Barnett (elected 3)
3. Stephen Parry (elected 5)
146,532 46.13 +7.34
Labor 1. Kerry O'Brien (elected 2)
2. Helen Polley (elected 4)
3. David Price
4. Nicole Wells
106,531 33.54 -3.30
Greens 1. Christine Milne (elected 6)
2. Karen Cassidy
3. Tom Millen
42,214 13.29 -0.50
Family First 1. Jacquie Petrusma
2. Lance Bergman
3. Lindsay Smith
7,563 2.38 +2.38
Democrats 1. Yulia Onsman
2. Suzanne Cass
2,614 0.82 -3.80
Christian Democrats 1. David Mitchell
2. Michael Fracalossi
2,076 0.65 +0.65
Independent Dino Ottavi 1,283 0.40 +0.40
CEC 1. Rob Larner
2. Adrian Watts
508 0.16 +0.16
Independent Rob Newitt 188 0.06 +0.06
Independent John McDonald 99 0.03 +0.03
Independent Ellen Gargan 32 0.01 +0.01
Total formal votes 317,667 96.63 -0.08
Informal votes 11,091 3.37 +0.08
Turnout 328,758 95.90 -0.93

Primary votes saw the Liberal Party winning three senate seats and Labor winning two, leaving the Greens leading for the sixth seat against the Family First Party with a sizable majority. However, Tasmania was one of two states where Labor preferenced the Family First Party ahead the Greens, meaning that the Family First candidate Jacquie Petrusma was expected to receive large amounts of preferences and win the final seat. However, Greens candidate Christine Milne ended up winning the seat, mainly due to the high amount of "below the line" voting in Tasmania. The result was three seats Liberal, two seats Labor and one seat Green.[10]

Territories[edit]

Australian Capital Territory[edit]

Australian federal election, 2004: Senate, Australian Capital Territory
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Quota 70,436
Labor 1. Kate Lundy (elected 1)
2. David Smith
86,855 41.10 -0.92
Liberal 1. Gary Humphries (elected 2)
2. Ian Morison
80,022 37.87 +3.57
Greens 1. Kerrie Tucker
2. Roland Manderson
34,575 16.36 +9.14
Democrats 1. Rachael Jacobs
2. Peter Bourne
4,528 2.14 -8.60
Christian Democrats 1. Tim Janes
2. John Miller
3,294 1.56 -0.19
Progressive Alliance 1. Jeannette Jolley
2. Ryan Deebank
1,147 0.54 +0.54
Independent Dave Edwards 885 0.42 +0.42
Total formal votes 211,306 97.54 -0.12
Informal votes 5,325 2.46 +0.12
Turnout 216,631 95.16 -0.53

Northern Territory[edit]

Australian federal election, 2004: Senate, Northern Territory
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Quota 30,785
Country Liberal 1. Nigel Scullion (elected 1)
2. Bernadette Greg
41,923 45.40 +1.69
Labor 1. Trish Crossin (elected 2)
2. Wayne Connop
38,204 41.37 +2.15
Greens 1. Mark Wakeham
2. Shan McKenzie
7,016 7.60 +3.33
Democrats 1. Janeen Bulsey
2. Fay Lawrence
4,368 4.73 -2.57
Socialist Alliance 1. Ray Hayes
2. Kathy Newnam
569 0.62 +0.62
Independent Wayne Wright 270 0.29 +0.29
Total formal votes 92,350 96.88 -0.36
Informal votes 2,973 3.12 +0.36
Turnout 95,323 84.73 -1.47

References[edit]