Australian Institute of International Affairs

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Australian Institute of International Affairs
LogoAIIAblueverysmall.JPG
Abbreviation AIIA
Type independent non-profit organisation
Website internationalaffairs.org.au

The Australian Institute of International Affairs is an Australian private research institute. It publishes the Australian Journal of International Affairs. It is one of the oldest active private research institutes in Australia.[1]:117

History[edit]

The origins of the institute can be traced to the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 that followed the First World War. Participants at that conference believed public opinion was vital in the development of foreign policy. To help create an informed public debate a number of organizations, including the American Council of Foreign Relations and the Royal Institute of International Affairs in the United Kingdom, were established to promote an understanding of international affairs.[2] Richard Boyer, an early president of the AIIA, stated that 'international affairs have ceased to be the sole preserve of foreign offices and specially trained diplomats, and have become not only the concern but the responsibility of the people of the world, and most directly of the people of the democracies.'[3]

The institute was formed in the 1920s as an affiliate of the Royal Institute of International Affairs. It became a federal body in 1933 and was established to provide an 'objective, scientific study of international affairs. Its purpose is to stimulate interest in and promote understanding of international affairs, including politics, economics and international law.'[4]

Prior to the separation of the Department of External Affairs from the Prime Minister's Department, the institute 'filled a gap by providing a forum for the discussion of Australia's external interests. Accordingly, the 1930s and 1940s were the period of greatest influence for the AIIA.'[5]

During the 1970s, when Australian foreign policy and the Asia-Pacific region were undergoing considerable change, the institute failed to expand. Gough Whitlam, the Australian Prime Minister at the time, wrote a message to the institute in 1972 that actively encouraged it to help inform public opinion on the rapid changes underway in Australia's near abroad.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Diane Stone (1996). A Think Tank in Evolution or Decline?: The Australian Institute of International Affairs in Comparative Perspective. Australian Journal Of International Affairs 50 (2) 117–136. (subscription required).
  2. ^ Gyngell, Allan (April 2018). "Australian Foreign Policy: Does the Public Matter? Should the Community Care?". Australian Journal of International Affairs. 72 (2): 87. doi:10.1080/10357718.2017.1421142. 
  3. ^ Boyer, RJF (1947). "Foreward". Australian Outlook. 1 (1): 3. doi:10.1080/00049914708565291. 
  4. ^ Stone, Diane (1996). "A Think Tank in Evolution or Decline?: The Australian Institute of International Affairs in Comparative Perspective". Australian Journal of International Affairs. 50 (2): 117-118. doi:10.1080/10357719608445175. 
  5. ^ Stone, Diane (1996). "A Think Tank in Evolution or Decline?: The Australian Institute of International Affairs in Comparative Perspective". Australian Journal of International Affairs. 50 (2): 119. doi:10.1080/10357719608445175. 
  6. ^ Stone, Diane (1996). "A Think Tank in Evolution or Decline?: The Australian Institute of International Affairs in Comparative Perspective". Australian Journal of International Affairs. 50 (2): 125. doi:10.1080/10357719608445175.