Australian Liberty Alliance

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Australian Liberty Alliance
Abbreviation ALA
President Debbie Robinson
Secretary Ralf Schumann
Founded 2015 (2015)
Headquarters 150 Albert Road, South Melbourne, Victoria, 3205
Ideology Conservatism
Economic liberalism
Right-wing populism
Anti-Islam
Political position Right-wing
Colours              Red, White, Blue
Website
australianlibertyalliance.org.au

The Australian Liberty Alliance (ALA) is a minor right-wing political party in Australia.[1][2] The party was registered with the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) on 28 July 2015.[3] The party held its official launch on 20 October 2015 at a private function in Perth, Western Australia, with Dutch politician Geert Wilders and British anti-sharia activist and UKIP member Anne Marie Waters as keynote speakers.[4]

2016 federal election[edit]

In May 2016 the party endorsed Angry Anderson as a candidate for the Senate representing New South Wales at the 2016 federal election.[1][2] Anderson was the second name for the party on the NSW ballot paper. The party fielded 13 senate candidates in all six states and 10 candidates in three states for seats in the House of Representatives in the 2016 election.[5] The party won 0.74% of the primary vote (102,982 votes) in the Senate[6] and 0.19% of the primary vote (25,337 votes) in the House of Representatives.[7]

On 7 April 2017, Kirralie Smith— a former candidate for the Australian Liberty Alliance and a member of the Q Society of Australia and Senate candidate for New South Wales in 2016—joined the Australian Conservatives.[8][9][10][11][12]

Platform and ideology[edit]

The party has released a manifesto listing twenty key policy areas, including "smaller smarter government, integration over separation, real reconciliation: no place for apartheid in Australia". However, the party's criticism of Islam has drawn the most attention. That includes the party's pledge to "stop the Islamisation of Australia".[13] The manifesto calls for a ten-year moratorium on residency visas for immigrants from Organisation of Islamic Cooperation member countries, excluding persecuted non-Muslim minorities from such countries. It also calls for restrictions to be placed on mosques in Australia.[14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Boult, Adam (9 May 2016). "Anderson is now candidate for anti-Islamic political party". The Daily Telegraph. England. Retrieved 4 June 2016. 
  2. ^ a b McCabe, Kathy (6 May 2016). "Angry Anderson joins anti-Islam party to chase a Senate seat at the Federal election". Australia: news.com.au. Retrieved 4 June 2016. 
  3. ^ "Australian Liberty Alliance". Australian Electoral Commission. Retrieved 21 May 2016. 
  4. ^ "Australian Liberty Alliance: Geert Wilders unveils Senate candidates amid warnings over 'blatant racism'". Australia: ABC News. 22 October 2015. Retrieved 21 May 2016. 
  5. ^ "Candidates for the 2016 federal election". Australian Electoral Commission. 11 June 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2016. 
  6. ^ Australian Electoral Commission Tally Room, retrieved 27 July 2016
  7. ^ Australian Electoral Commission Tally Room, retrieved 27 July 2016
  8. ^ Corporate or institutional Author. "About Kirralie Smith". Retrieved 11 February 2017. 
  9. ^ Corporate or institutional Author. "About Us". Retrieved 11 February 2017. 
  10. ^ Federal Politics (8 April 2017). "Anti-halal leader Kirralie Smith joins Cory Bernardi's Australian Conservatives". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 25 April 2017. 
  11. ^ "Kirralie Smith joins Australian Conservatives". Australian Conservatives. 7 April 2017. Retrieved 25 April 2017. 
  12. ^ Federal Politics (8 April 2017). "Anti-halal leader Kirralie Smith joins Cory Bernardi's Australian Conservatives". Brisbane Times. Retrieved 25 April 2017. 
  13. ^ Murray, Oliver (26 April 2016). "Far-right-wing parties after your vote on election day". news.com.au. Retrieved 21 May 2016. 
  14. ^ Bourke, Latika (7 April 2016). "Australian Liberty Alliance, the anti-Islam, Donald Trump-style party, claims major growth". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 21 May 2016. 

External links[edit]