Australian nationalism

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Flag of Australia

Australian nationalism asserts that the Australians are a nation and promotes the national and cultural unity of Australia.[1][2][3][4] Australian nationalism has a history dating back to the late 19th century as Australia gradually developed a distinct culture and identity from that of Britain, beginning to view itself as a unique and separate entity and not simply an extension or a derivation of British culture and identity.[citation needed]

History[edit]

Pre-Federation[edit]

By the early 19th century, Australia was governed by the British Empire as a series of six largely self-governing colonies that were spread across the continent.[5] Attempts to coordinate governance had failed in the 1860s due to a lack of popular support and lack of interest from the British government, but by the 1880s, and with the rise of nationalist movements in Europe, the efforts to establish a federation of the Australian colonies began to gather momentum. The British government supported federation as a means to cement British influence in the South Pacific.[6]

Nationalistic sentiments increased as a result of Australia's participation in the First and Second World Wars, with concepts such as "mateship" becoming a cornerstone of Australian nationalism.[7]

Australian nationalist parties[edit]

Current[edit]

Defunct[edit]

Australian nationalist movements and groups[edit]

Active[edit]

Defunct[edit]

Prominent Australian Nationalists[edit]

Historical[edit]

Contemporary[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ wiliam, Sydney Australia. "Nationalism in Australia". Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  2. ^ Christopher Scanlon (25 January 2014). "Australia Day: is nationalism really so bad?". The Conversation. Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  3. ^ "Surrendering nationalism". Griffith Review. Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  4. ^ "Nationalism and racism". Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  5. ^ Crisp, Leslie (1949). The Parliamentary Government of the Commonwealth of Australia. Adelaide: Longmans, Green & Co. Lotd. pp. 2.
  6. ^ Trainor, Luke (1 January 1994). British Imperialism and Australian Nationalism: Manipulation, Conflict and Compromise in the Late Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press. pp. 3–4. ISBN 9780521436045.
  7. ^ Trainor, Luke (1 January 1994). British Imperialism and Australian Nationalism: Manipulation, Conflict and Compromise in the Late Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press. p. 4. ISBN 9780521436045.