Australian nationalism

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Australian nationalism asserts that the Australians are a nation and promotes the national and cultural unity of Australia.[1][2][3][4] Australian nationalism has a history dating back to the late 19th century as Australia gradually developed a distinct culture and identity from that of Britain, beginning to view itself as a unique and separate entity and not simply an extension or a derivation of British culture and identity.

History[edit]

Pre-Federation[edit]

By the late 19th century, Australia was governed as a series of six largely self-governing colonies that were spread across the continent.[5] Attempts to coordinate governance had failed in the 1860s for want of popular support and the support from the British government, but by the 1880s, and with the rise of nationalist movements in Europe, the efforts to establish a federation of the Australian colonies began to gather momentum. British imperialism was a significant driver of this nationalism, with Britain eager for the Australian colonies to consolidate in order to better cement British influence in the South Pacific.[6] This form of nationalism supported a view of Australia as a nation of "White Britons"; Indigenous Australians were not included in this vision of a unified nation.[7]

Australian nationalist parties[edit]

Current[edit]

Defunct[edit]

Australian nationalist movements and groups[edit]

Active[edit]

Defunct[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ wiliam, Sydney Australia. "Nationalism in Australia". Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  2. ^ Christopher Scanlon (25 January 2014). "Australia Day: is nationalism really so bad?". The Conversation. Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  3. ^ "Surrendering nationalism". Griffith Review. Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  4. ^ "Nationalism and racism". Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  5. ^ Crisp, Leslie (1949). The Parliamentary Government of the Commonwealth of Australia. Adelaide: Longmans, Green & Co. Lotd. p. 2.
  6. ^ Trainor, Luke (1 January 1994). British Imperialism and Australian Nationalism: Manipulation, Conflict and Compromise in the Late Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press. pp. 3–4. ISBN 9780521436045.
  7. ^ Trainor, Luke (1 January 1994). British Imperialism and Australian Nationalism: Manipulation, Conflict and Compromise in the Late Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press. p. 5. ISBN 9780521436045.