Avant-punk

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Avant-punk is a punk music style characterized by "screeching experimentation," and a term by which critics used to describe the wave of American punk bands from the 1970s.[1] It originated with the New York-based rock band the Velvet Underground, while antecedents included early Kinks and garage band one-shots collected on the Nuggets series of compilation albums.[2] According to critic Robert Christgau, between 1966 and 1975, the only notable acts who could be categorized as "avant-punk" were the Velvets, MC5, Iggy Pop and the Stooges, the Modern Lovers, and the New York Dolls.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Smith, Chris (2009). 101 Albums that Changed Popular Music. Oxford University Press. p. 146. ISBN 978-0-19-537371-4.
  2. ^ a b Christgau, Robert (October 24, 1977). "Avant-Punk: A Cult Explodes . . . and a Movement Is Born". Village Voice.