Avery Rockefeller

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Avery Rockefeller
Born (1903-09-11)September 11, 1903
Manhattan, New York
Died May 22, 1986(1986-05-22) (aged 82)
Overhills, North Carolina
Nationality United States
Alma mater Yale University
Occupation Banker
Spouse(s)
Anna Griffith Mark (m. 1923)
Children 3
Parent(s) Percy Avery Rockefeller
Isabel Goodrich Stillman
Relatives See Rockefeller family

Avery Rockefeller (September 11, 1903 – May 22, 1986) was an American investment banker and conservationist who was a member of the Rockefeller family.[1]

Early life[edit]

Rockefeller was born on September 11, 1903 to Percy Avery Rockefeller and Isabel Goodrich Stillman.[2] His paternal grandparents were William Avery Rockefeller Jr. and Almira Geraldine Goodsell. His maternal grandfather was James Jewett Stillman (1850–1918), the chairman of the board of directors of the National City Bank.[3] His father's brother, William Goodsell Rockefeller (1870–1922), married his mother's sister, Elsie Stillman (1872–1935).[4]

He attended Yale University, graduating in 1926.[1]

Career[edit]

In 1928, Rockefeller joined the storied J. Henry Schroder Banking Corporation and became Assistant Treasurer in 1931.

On July 8, 1936, Rockefeller co-founded Schroder, Rockefeller & Co., Inc.[5] Its purpose was to take over the underwriting and general securities business formerly carried out by the J. Henry Schroder Banking Corporation. The firm had a capital of $3,000,000.[5] Its first President, Carlton P. Fuller, was former Vice President of the J. Henry Schroder Banking Corporation. The original stock holders were Rockfeller, Fuller, Gerald E. Donovan, John. L. Simpson, Frederick B. Adams and the J. Henry Schroder Banking Corporation itself.[6] He served as Vice President and Later President of Schroder, Rockefeller & Co.[7]

In 1961, James E. Madden was appointed as President and Avery Rockefeller was appointed as Chairman of the Board. Rockefeller retired in 1967 and the company was merged into the J. Henry Schroder Banking Corporation.[8][9][10]

In 1950, he was elected a director of J. Henry Schroder Banking Corporation,[11] and served until 1970.[12] He was also a director of the Air Reduction Company, the J. Henry Schroder Bank & Trust Company.[11]

Philanthropy[edit]

Rockefeller founded the Wild Wings Foundation, a conservation organisation with projects in Belize and the Adirondacks.[1]

Personal life[edit]

On September 20, 1923, Rockefeller secretly married Anna Griffith Mark (1906–1996), the daughter of Clayton Mark (1858–1936), a wealthy steel manufacturer.[13] Following the marriage, the newlyweds eloped, planning to complete their education before telling their parents. However, the arrival of their first child in 1924 forced them to reveal the marriage.[14] By his wife Anna he had three children:

  • Avery Rockefeller Jr. (1924–1979),[15][16] who married Lucia Peavy Ewing, daughter of Sherman Ewing, in 1948.[17]
  • Ann Rockefeller (b. 1926),[18] who married Edward Scales Elliman (1923–2009),[19] son of Douglas Elliman, president of the same real estate company.[20][21][22]
  • Joan Rockefeller, who married David Hunter McAlpin, Jr., a minister,[23] in 1953.[24][25]

Avery, like his father, had a large collection of jewelry and valuable items. In 1935, Avery's home was looted of jewelry, only a few years after his father's house had been looted.

Rockefeller died of a heart attack at his home in Overhills, North Carolina on May 22, 1986.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "AVERY ROCKEFELLER, INVESTMENT BANKER AND CONSERVATIONIST". The New York Times. 23 May 1986. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  2. ^ "Leaves Millions. Percy Rockefeller, Nephew of John Passes". Associated Press. September 26, 1934. Retrieved 2012-11-04. Percy Avery Rockefeller was born in New York February 1878 which was some time after the migration of his parents, William and Almira Goodsell Rockefeller,..... 
  3. ^ "James Stillman, Head Of City Bank, Dies Suddenly". The New York Times. Mar 16, 1918. Retrieved 2012-09-16. James Stillman, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the National City Bank, the Presidency of which he resigned in 1908, when he was succeeded by Frank A. Vanderlip, died suddenly yesterday afternoon at 5:30 O'clock at his home, 9 East Seventy-second Street. ... 
  4. ^ Stillman, Times Wide World Photo mrs James A. (6 June 1931). "MRS. J.A. STILLMAN GETS DIVORCE, WEDS FOWLER M'CORMICK; PRINCIPALS IN SURPRISE WEDDING." The New York Times. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  5. ^ a b "Schroder Rockefeller Formed". The New York Times. 14 July 1936. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  6. ^ "ROCKEFELLER KIN IN BANKING FIELD; Avery, Grandson of William Rockefeller, a Founder of New Investment Concern. A PRINCIPAL STOCKHOLDER Schroder, Rockefeller & Co., Inc., Will Do Underwriting and Securities Business". The New York Times. 9 July 1936. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  7. ^ "FROEDTERT GRAIN PLANNING MERGER; Schroder Rockefeller Seeks to Bring Concern Together With Rockwood & Co". The New York Times. 22 January 1947. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  8. ^ "Schroder, Rockefeller Elects". The New York Times. 26 April 1967. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  9. ^ "New Chairman Named By Schroder Banking". The New York Times. 8 July 1967. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  10. ^ "International Holdings Elects New President". The New York Times. 22 December 1967. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  11. ^ a b Times, Special To The New York (13 December 1950). "Schroder Elects Rockefeller". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  12. ^ Times, Special To The New York (26 July 1970). "Job Changes:". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  13. ^ Smith, S. & Mark, S. (2011). Marktown: Clayton Mark's Planned Worker Community in Northwest Indiana. South Shore Journal, 4. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-09-13. Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  14. ^ "AVERY ROCKEFELLER SECRETLY WEDDED; Grandnephew of John D. and Miss Anna Mark of Chicago Wed Over Year Ago". The New York Times. 9 December 1924. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  15. ^ Times, Special Cable To The New York (10 December 1924). "AVERY ROCKEFELLER AND WIFE IN FRANCE; London Paper Says They and Baby Son Left England a Week Ago After Sightseeing". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  16. ^ Times, Special To The New York (7 December 1979). "Avery Rockefeller Jr., Grolier Executive, 55". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  17. ^ Times, Special to the New York (4 July 1948). "MISS LUCIA EWING MINNESOTA BRIDE; Wed to Avery Rockefeller Jr. in Home of Grandfather, Frank T. Heffelfinger". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  18. ^ "A Daughter to Mrs. A. Rockefeller." The New York Times. 12 October 1926. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  19. ^ "Paid Notice: Deaths ELLIMAN, EDWARD S". The New York Times. 25 February 2009. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  20. ^ "ANN ROCKEFELLER BECOMES ENGAGED; Great-Grandniece of the Late John D. Is to Be Married to Seaman Edward S. Elliman". The New York Times. 26 September 1945. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  21. ^ Times, Special To The New York (15 November 1946). "ANN ROCKEFELLER TO BE WED DEC. 21; Marriage to Edward Elliman to Take Place in Greenwich --Reception at Field Club". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  22. ^ Winburn, Jay Te (22 December 1946). "ANN ROCKEFELLER GREENWICH BRIDE; Great-Grandniece of Late John D. Rockefeller Is Married to Edward Scales Elliman GOWNED IN WHITE SATIN Judy Peck Serves as Maid of Honor--D.L. Elliman, Realty Leader, Best Man for Son". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  23. ^ Times, Special To The New York (14 January 1957). "NEGROES INDUCT WHITE MINISTER; 115-Year-Old Presbyterian Church in Princeton Heeds Assembly Stand on Bias". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  24. ^ Time, Special to the New York (17 November 1952). "JOAN ROOKBLLER. BECOMES ENGAGED; Greenwich Girl, a Student at Columbia, to Be Bride of David Hunter McAIpin Jr". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 May 2017. 
  25. ^ Times, Special To The New York (14 June 1953). "JOAN ROCKEFELLER WED IN GREENWICH; Alumna of Briarcliff Junior College Becomes the Bride of David H. McAlpin Jr". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 May 2017.