Avro Type F

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Type F
Avro Type F.jpg
Role Experimental aircraft
Manufacturer A.V.Roe and Company
First flight 1 May 1912
Number built 1

The Avro Type F was an early single seat British aircraft from Avro. On 1 May 1912 it became the first aircraft in the world to fly with a completely enclosed cabin for the pilot as an integral part of the design.[1]

Design and development[edit]

It was a wire-braced mid-wing monoplane with a tailskid undercarriage. The fuselage was teardrop-shaped with flat sides with cellon windows. Oil leakage from the engine had been anticipated to obscure pilot view by coating cabin windows; so two circular windows at the pilot's head level could be opened for the pilot's head to protrude when flying, but their use proved unnecessary. Ingress and egress was via a sheet-aluminum trapdoor in the fuselage top.[1] The cabin was quite cramped, being only 2 ft (60 cm) across at its widest point.

The Type F made a few test flights in mid-1912 until damaged beyond repair in a hard landing on 13 September, after which it was not repaired. Its Viale 35 hp engine is on display at the Science Museum in London; and the rudder was preserved by the Royal Aero Club.[1]


Data from [1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one pilot
  • Length: 23 ft 0 in (7.01 m)
  • Wingspan: 28 ft 0 in (8.53 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 6 in (2.29 m)
  • Wing area: 158 ft2 (14.7 m2)
  • Empty weight: 550 lb (250 kg)
  • Gross weight: 800 lb (360 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Viale 35 hp 5-cylinder radial, 35 hp (26 kW)


  • Maximum speed: 65 mph (105 km/h)
  • Rate of climb: 300 ft/min (1.5 m/s)


  1. ^ a b c d King, H.F. (1969). Milestones of the Air (McGraw-Hill ed.). New York: Jane's All the World's Aircraft Publishing Company. pp. 24&25. 
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 91. 
  • World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 889 Sheet 92–93. 
  • britishaircraft.co.uk