Awami Workers Party

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Awami Workers' Party
عوامی ورکرز پارٹی
President Fanoos Gujjar
General Secretary Akhtar Hussain
Vice President Abida Chaudhry
Deputy General Secretary Ismat Shahjahan
Senior Vice President Yousuf Masti Khan
Finance Secretary Shazia Khan (AWP)
Information Secretary Farman Ali
Founded November 2012
Merger of Labour Party Pakistan, National Workers Party, Awami Party Pakistan
Headquarters Lahore
Student wing National Students Federation
Ideology Socialism
Progressivism,
Democratic Socialism,
Anti-fascism
Political position Far-left
Colors Red, White
Election symbol
AWP election symbol.svg
Party flag
Flag of Awami Workers party.jpg
Website
http://www.awamiworkersparty.org

The Awami Workers Party or People's Workers Party (Urdu: عوامی ورکرز پارٹی‎) is a left-wing political party in Pakistan. The party’s programme was designed to bring together the disparate struggles of workers, peasants, students, women and ethnic and religious minorities in Pakistan under the banner of a genuinely democratic and socialist politics.

Genesis[edit]

It was formed in November 2012, as a merger of the Labour Party Pakistan, the Awami Party Pakistan and the Workers Party Pakistan. This merger reflects recognition within leftist circles, both of the growing contradictions within the prevailing structure of power and the need for unity and maturity so as to take advantage of these contradictions. The merger process was impelled by younger activists within these three parties, and some outside of them, that do not carry the baggage of Cold War sectarian conflicts (read: Stalinists, Trotskyists, Maoists, etc.).

While not the first attempt to forge Left unity, the formation of the AWP generated a great deal of excitement amongst progressives both within and outside the country due to its promise of building upon the best traditions of the twentieth century left and making ideological and organizational adaptations necessary for a viable leftist project in the present century.

In the first 20 months of AWP’s inception, as the cauldron that is Pakistani politics has become even more explosive, the fledgling party confirmed its credentials as the only meaningful Left alternative to the status quo in Pakistan. As the contradictions of state, imperialism, patriarchy and combined and uneven development in a multi-national country grow increasingly acute, reactionaries of all hues have consolidated their monopoly over political discourse, aided by a complicit corporate media.

The party held its First Congress on Sept 27–28, which consolidated the first phase of party-building, with the election of its national leadership following sub-national party elections around the country.

AWP continues to work towards becoming a genuine progressive and socialist political alternative to the material and ideological status-quo in Pakistan that is equipped to deal with the challenges posed by the forces of capital, imperialism and reaction in the contemporary era.

This merger reflects recognition within leftist circles, both of the growing contradictions within the prevailing structure of power and the need for unity and maturity so as to take advantage of these contradictions.

At the party's founding congress, Abid Hassan Minto was elected president, Fanoos Gujjar chairman and Farooq Tariq general secretary.[1]

General elections 2013[edit]

In the Pakistani general election, 2013 the party received 18,650 votes or 0.04% of the national share.

AWP in Gilgit-Baltistan[edit]

AWP is active in politics of Gilgit-Baltistan. It has taken interest in protests against government of Pakistan, for it is lacking in Gilgit Baltistan. AWP is accused of being anti-Pakistani, but party has rejected all such claims.

AWP took part in elections of 2015. Baba Jan was AWP's candidate, in GBLA-6 constituency. Jan bagged most votes after PMLN's Mir Gazanfar Ali. New elections in GBLA-6 are expected to be held in September 2016 after the seat became vacant on Mir Gazanfar's appointment as Governor of Gilgit Baltistan.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Awami Workers Party: Interim leaders elected for new left party". The Express Tribune. 12 November 2012. Retrieved 13 November 2012. 

External links[edit]