Awi Federgruen

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Awi Federgruen
Born Geneva, Switzerland
Occupation Professor
Known for Operations Management
Title Charles E. Exley Professor of Management
Awards Distinguished Fellowship Award by MSOM
Website www8.gsb.columbia.edu/cbs-directory/detail/af7
Academic background
Education PhD in Operations Research
Alma mater University of Amsterdam
Academic work
Main interests Supply Chain Management, Dynamic Programming

Awi Federgruen (born 1953, Geneva) is a Dutch/American mathematician and operations researcher and Charles E. Exley Professor of Management at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business and affiliate professor at the university's Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Biography[edit]

Federgruen received his BA from the University of Amsterdam in 1972, where he also received his MS in 1975 and his PhD in Operations Research in 1978[1] with a thesis entitled "Markovian Control Problems, Functional Equations and Algorithms" under supervision of Gijsbert de Leve and Henk Tijms.[2]

Federgruen started his academic career as Research Fellow at the Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, Amsterdam early 1970s, and was faculty member of the University of Rochester, Graduate School of Management. In 1979 he was appointed Professor at the Columbia University. In 1992 he was named the first Charles E. Exley, Jr. Professor of Management,[3] and holds the Chair of the Decision, Risk and Operations (DRO) Division. From 1997 to 2002 he was Vice Dean of the University.[4] He serves as a principal consultant for the Israel Air Force, in the area of logistics and procurement policies.

Federgruen has supervised many PhD students;[2] recent graduates include Yusheng Zheng (at Wharton Business School, University of Pennsylvania), Ziv Katalan (at Wharton Business School, University of Pennsylvania), Fernando Bernstein (Fuqua Business School, Duke university), Joern Meissner (Kuehne Logistics University in Hamburg, Germany), Gad Allon (Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University), Nan Yang (Olin Business School, Washington University), Margaret Pierson (Havard Business School), and Yossi AVIV (Olin Business School, Washington University), see [5]

Federgruen was awarded the 2004 Distinguished Fellowship Award by the Manufacturing, Service and Operations Management society for Outstanding Research and Scholarship in Operations Management; and also the Distinguished Fellow, Manufacturing and Service Operations Management Society.[6][7]

He is the current editor of Naval Research Logistics.

Work[edit]

Federgruen is known for his work in the development and implementation of planning models for supply chain management and logistical systems. His work on scenario planning is widely cited, the field has gained prominence as computers now allow the processing of large masses of complex data.[8][9]

His work on supply chain models has wide applications in, for example, flu vaccine and the risks of relying too heavily on a single vaccine supplier.[10]

He is also an expert on applied probability models and dynamic programming. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, Federgruen was quoted on the subject of applying predictive models to minimize risk in disaster situations.[11]

Publications[edit]

Books, a selection:

  • 1978. Markovian Control Problems, Functional Equations and Algorithms. Doctorate thesis University of Amsterdam.

Articles, a selection:

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www4.gsb.columbia.edu/cbs-directory/detail/494917/Awi+Federgruen [1]
  2. ^ a b Awi Federgruen at the Mathematics Genealogy Project.
  3. ^ Columbia Daily Spectator, Volume CXVI, Number 127, 30 November 1992.
  4. ^ AWI FEDERGRUEN at gsb.columbia.edu, 2004.
  5. ^ PhD Placements at Columbia Business School
  6. ^ MSOM Business Meeting Minutes, INFORMS Denver Conference
  7. ^ MSOM Distinguished Fellow Award
  8. ^ Theory and Practice of Leadership, , by Roger Gill , 2006, p. 197
  9. ^ Management Consulting: Delivering An Effective Project, by Philip A. Wickham 2004, p. 111
  10. ^ [2][permanent dead link]
  11. ^ Columbia Business School: Hermes Magazine Archived 2007-07-28 at the Wayback Machine.

External links[edit]