B. J. Fogg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

B. J. Fogg
2017 portrait BJ Fogg
Born
Brian Jeffrey Fogg

(1963-08-07) August 7, 1963 (age 57)
Dallas, Texas, U.S.
Alma materBrigham Young University, Stanford University
Known forcaptology
Scientific career
Fieldscaptology
InstitutionsStanford University
ThesisCharismatic computers (1997)
Websitehttp://www.bjfogg.com/

Brian Jeffrey Fogg (born August 7, 1963) is an American social scientist who is currently a research associate at Stanford University[1] and author. He is the founder and director of the Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab, later renamed as Behavior Design Lab.[2][3]

Education[edit]

Brian Jeffrey Fogg was born in 1963 in Dallas.[4] He later grew up in Fresno, California, where he was raised in a Mormon family with six siblings. At the age of eighteen, Fogg went to Peru for a two-year mission.[5][6] Fogg has a B.A.[7] and MA. in English from Brigham Young University[8] and a PhD in Communications from Stanford,[9] where he served as a teaching assistant to Philip Zimbardo.[10]

Career[edit]

From 1992 to 1993, Fogg was "one of the founders of the Student Review, Brigham Young University's independent student newspaper" and "taught English and design at BYU."[11] While at BYU, Fogg published eight short stories and poems in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought; [12][13][14] Sunstone, "a quarterly journal of Mormon experience, scholarship, issues, and art";[15][16] and other Mormon-affiliated publications.[17] His Masters thesis, "Terms of Address Among Latter-Day Saints"[18] and "Names Mormons Use for Jesus: Contexts and Trends"[19] were both published by the Deseret Language and Linguistics Society Symposium in February 1990 and March 1991, respectively.

In 1998, Fogg published a peer-reviewed paper, Persuasive Computers: Perspectives and Research Directions, which included a section that "proposes ethical responsibilities for designers of persuasive computers and captology researchers, and discusses the importance of educating about persuasion."[20]

In 1999, he was the guest editor for an issue of ACM focusing on persuasive technologies.[21]

In 2003, Fogg published the book, Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do. This book provided a foundation for captology, the study of Computers As Persuasive Technologies. In it, he discusses the implications of macrosuasion and microsuasion—terms he uses to define and describe the persuasive intent of a product, providing examples across the web, in video games, and other software products.[22]

In 2006, Fogg and some of his students created a video for consideration by the FTC about persuasive technology.[23]

In 2007, Fogg co-taught a Stanford course about Facebook Apps with Dave McClure,[24] where students used persuasive design to create Facebook apps that amassed millions of users during the 10-week course.[25] The New York Times quoted Fogg as referring to it as "a period of time when you could walk in and collect gold."[26]

In 2009, Fogg published the Fogg Behavior Model (FBM), a model for analyzing and designing human behavior.[27] The FBM describes three conditions needed for a behavior to occur: (1) motivation (2) ability and (3) a prompt. Motivation can be influenced by factors like pleasure/pain, hope/fear, and social acceptance/rejection. Ability can be impacted by time, money, physical effort, brain cycles, social deviance, and non-routine. Prompts are also referred to as triggers.[28]

In December 2011, Fogg developed a method to develop habits from baby steps, which he calls "Tiny Habits".[29] He gave two TEDx talks on this and related topics.[30][31]

He was the founder and director of Stanford's Mobile Health conference (2008–2012).[32]

In 2020, Fogg published the book, Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything, which describes in detail the "Tiny Habits" method of starting small when building sustainable habits to support a happier and healthier life.[33] This book was on The New York Times Best Sellers List—under Advice, How-To & Miscellaneous—for three weeks.[34]

Personal life[edit]

Fogg lives in Healdsburg, California[35] and Maui.[36]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Persuasive Technology (2003)
  • Mobile Persuasion (with Dean Eckles; 2008)
  • Texting 4 Health (with Richard Adler; 2009)
  • Facebook For Parents (with Linda Fogg Phillips; 2010)
  • Tiny Habits (2020)

References[edit]

  1. ^ University, Stanford (September 14, 2016). "BJ Fogg". Stanford News. Retrieved December 17, 2019.
  2. ^ Stanford, Stanford University; Notice, California 94305 Copyright Complaints Trademark. "Behavior Design Lab | Human Sciences and Technologies Advanced Research Institute". hstar.stanford.edu. Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  3. ^ Bowles, Nellie (October 6, 2019). "Addicted to Screens? That's Really a You Problem". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 29, 2020.
  4. ^ "Brian Jeffrey Fogg". The Complete Marquis Who's Who Biographies. January 13, 2017. Retrieved March 18, 2020 – via NexisUni.
  5. ^ Specner, Stephan. "Easy-to-Form Habits That Will Transform Your Life with BJ Fogg". GetYourselfOptimized.com. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  6. ^ http://tinyhabitsacademy.org/about-us/
  7. ^ Brigham Young University (1990). Commencement exercise programs, 1990–. Harold B. Lee Library.
  8. ^ "Commencement Program, April 23, 1992 , Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah".
  9. ^ Fogg, Brian J. (1997). Charismatic computers: creating more likable and persuasive interactive technologies by leveraging principles from social psychology /.
  10. ^ Fogg, B. J.; Euchner, Jim (September 3, 2019). "Designing for Behavior Change—New Models and Moral Issues". Research-Technology Management. 62 (5): 14–19. doi:10.1080/08956308.2019.1638490. ISSN 0895-6308. S2CID 203295092.
  11. ^ "Brian J. Fogg | Mormon Literature & Creative Arts Database | HBLL". mormonarts.lib.byu.edu. Retrieved February 6, 2020.
  12. ^ "Brian J. Fogg | Mormon Literature & Creative Arts Database | HBLL". mormonarts.lib.byu.edu. Retrieved February 6, 2020.
  13. ^ Fogg, B.J. (Summer 1992). "Glimmers and Glitches in Zion" (PDF).
  14. ^ "Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, Volume 24 Number 1, Spring 1991". Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  15. ^ "Implosion | Mormon Literature & Creative Arts Database | HBLL". mormonarts.lib.byu.edu. Retrieved February 6, 2020.
  16. ^ "Sunstone Magazine, Volume 12 Number 6, November 1988, Issue 68". Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  17. ^ "Dad in the Kitchen | Mormon Literature & Creative Arts Database | HBLL". mormonarts.lib.byu.edu. Retrieved February 6, 2020.
  18. ^ Fogg, Brian (February 23, 1990). "Terms of Address Among Latter-day Saints". Deseret Language and Linguistic Society Symposium. 16 (1).
  19. ^ Fogg, BJ; Kessinger, Donette; Palmer, Brett; Pels, Kaatje (March 8, 1991). "Names Mormons Use for Jesus: Contexts and Trends". Deseret Language and Linguistic Society Symposium. 17 (1).
  20. ^ "Persuasive Computers: Perspectives and Research Directions" (PDF).
  21. ^ "May 1999 Table of Contents | Communications of the ACM". cacm.acm.org. Retrieved February 5, 2019.
  22. ^ "Persuasive Technology – 1st Edition". elsevier.com. Retrieved December 27, 2019.
  23. ^ Fogg, B. J. (January 21, 2015), BJ-Fogg-FTC-Fall2006, retrieved February 5, 2019
  24. ^ "Stanford Class' Facebook Application Crosses 1 Million Installs". TechCrunch. Retrieved December 31, 2019.
  25. ^ "Stanford Class' Facebook Application Crosses 1 Million Installs". TechCrunch. Retrieved December 31, 2019.
  26. ^ Helft, Miguel (May 7, 2011). "The 'Facebook Class' Built Apps, and Fortunes". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 19, 2019.
  27. ^ "Behaviour Model" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on April 20, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  28. ^ "Behavior Model". behaviormodel. Retrieved December 27, 2019.
  29. ^ Sweatt, Lydia (October 8, 2013). "Tiny Habits". SUCCESS. Retrieved February 4, 2020.
  30. ^ TEDx Talks, Forget big change, start with a tiny habit: BJ Fogg at TEDxFremont, retrieved February 5, 2019
  31. ^ Tiny surprises for happiness and health | BJ Fogg, PhD | TEDxMaui, retrieved December 27, 2019
  32. ^ "Stanford Mobile Health 2012 – Stanford Mobile Health 2012". mobilehealth.org. Retrieved December 20, 2019.
  33. ^ "Tiny Habits". www.goodreads.com. Retrieved January 4, 2021.
  34. ^ "Advice, How-To & Miscellaneous Books - Best Sellers - Books - Feb. 9, 2020 - The New York Times". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 4, 2021.
  35. ^ https://twitter.com/bjfogg/status/503683789315244032[non-primary source needed]
  36. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gsf7AT3itFg | date=Nov 2020

External links[edit]