B. J. Young (ice hockey)

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B. J. Young
BJYoung.jpg
Born (1977-07-23)July 23, 1977
Anchorage, Alaska, USA
Died November 30, 2005(2005-11-30) (aged 28)
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 178 lb (81 kg; 12 st 10 lb)
Position Right Wing
Shot Right
Played for Detroit Red Wings
National team  United States
NHL Draft 157th overall, 1997
Detroit Red Wings
Playing career 1997–2005

Jerry Franklin "B. J." Young II (July 23, 1977 – November 30, 2005)[1] was a professional ice hockey right winger. He was drafted by the Detroit Red Wings in the sixth round, 157th overall, of the 1997 NHL Entry Draft. He played one game in the National Hockey League with Red Wings.

Young played junior hockey with the Tri-City Americans and Red Deer Rebels of the Western Hockey League (WHL). While with Red Deer he led the WHL in goal scoring during the 1996–97 season and was named to the WHL East First All-Star Team. Young spent the majority of his career in the minor leagues playing for the Adirondack Red Wings and Cincinnati Mighty Ducks of the American Hockey League, the Manitoba Moose of the International Hockey League, and the Anchorage/Alaska Aces in both the West Coast Hockey League and ECHL. Born in Anchorage, Alaska Young represented the United States at the 1997 World Junior Championships, winning a silver medal.

Playing career[edit]

Amateur[edit]

Young began playing hockey at age 4 and by age 8 he was playing travel ice hockey.[1] He began his junior career with the Tri-City Americans of the Western Hockey League (WHL). In his first season with the Americans Young scored 19 goals and 43 points in 54 games, adding another goal and two points in two playoff games.[2] During the 1994–95 season, his second, with Tri-City Young was traded to the Red Deer Rebels.[3] Though he only scored 23 points in 51 games between the two teams, Americans' general manager Dennis Beyak stated it was a deal that could come back to haunt them.[2][3] In his first full season with Red Deer Young had a breakout season scoring 49 goals and 94 points.[2] He followed up by scoring 58 goals and 114 points in 63 games during the 1996–97 season.[2] The goal total led the WHL and he was named to the WHL East First All-Star Team.[2][4] In the off-season Young was drafted by the National Hockey League's (NHL) Detroit Red Wings in the sixth round, 157th overall, of the 1997 NHL Entry Draft.[5]

Professional[edit]

After being drafted Young signed three-year two-way contract with the Red Wings. He played in six preseason games for the Red Wings, but with Detroit being the defending Stanley Cup champions he was unable to make the team out of camp. He began his professional career with Detroit's American Hockey League affiliate, the Adirondack Red Wings.[6] Young played two seasons in Adirondack scoring 67 points in 123 games.[2] In his third professional season Young joined the Cincinnati Mighty Ducks who he led in goals with 25.[2][7] He also made his NHL debut during the season playing one game for the Red Wings. He played two shifts in the game without registering a point. It was the only NHL game of his career.[2][4]

In the off-season Young re-signed with Detroit.[8] He returned to Cincinnati but after 42 games Detroit moved Young to the Manitoba Moose in the International Hockey League (IHL).[2][9] Young finished the year scoring 22 goals and 51 points in 75 games between the two teams.[2] The following season he signed with his hometown Anchorage Aces in the West Coast Hockey League (WCHL).[2] He was named team captain for the 2002–03 season. After which he took a year off from hockey for personal and family matters.[4] Prior to the 2004–05 season he was given a tryout to return to the Aces, now called the Alaska Aces playing in the ECHL.[10] He made the team due in part to making an impression on the coaching staff after not quitting on a difficult conditioning skate. He recorded 13 goals and 35 points in 48 games in his final professional season.

International play[edit]

Medal record
Representing United States United States
Ice hockey
World Junior Championships
Silver medal – second place 1997 Switzerland

Young represented the United States at the 1997 World Junior Championships in Geneva, Switzerland.[11] Young scored two goals and four points in six games helping the US win the silver medal.[12][13]

Off the ice[edit]

Young was born on July 23, 1977 to Margo and Jerry Young in Anchorage, Alaska. He was married and the couple had one child, a son.[1] Young was killed in a single-car accident in Vancouver, British Columbia on November 30, 2005, when the car he was driving veered off the road struck a tree and hit a light pole. His widow has since married his best friend Terry Ryan who played with him in Red Deer[4][14]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1993–94 Tri-City Americans WHL 54 19 24 43 66 2 1 1 2 2
1994–95 Tri-City Americans WHL 30 6 3 9 39
1994–95 Red Deer Rebels WHL 21 5 9 14 33
1995–96 Red Deer Rebels WHL 67 49 45 94 144 8 4 9 13 12
1996–97 Red Deer Rebels WHL 63 58 56 114 97 16 8 14 22 26
1997–98 Adirondack Red Wings AHL 65 15 22 37 191 3 0 2 2 6
1998–99 Adirondack Red Wings AHL 58 13 17 30 150 3 1 0 1 6
1999–00 Cincinnati Mighty Ducks AHL 71 25 26 51 147
1999–00 Detroit Red Wings NHL 1 0 0 0 0
2000–01 Cincinnati Mighty Ducks AHL 42 14 22 36 111
2000–01 Manitoba Moose IHL 33 8 7 15 47 13 4 2 6 14
2001–02 Anchorage Aces WCHL 26 10 10 20 159 4 2 0 2 20
2002–03 Anchorage Aces WCHL 52 17 25 42 233
2004–05 Alaska Aces ECHL 48 13 22 35 94 14 1 7 8 31
NHL Totals 1 0 0 0 0
AHL Totals 236 67 87 154 599 6 1 2 3 12

International[edit]

Year Team Event Result GP G A Pts PIM
1997 United States WJC 2nd, silver medalist(s) 6 2 2 4 4
Junior totals 6 2 2 4 4

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "B.J. Young killed in single car accident". Anchorage Daily News. 2005-12-01. Archived from the original on 2006-03-11. Retrieved 2013-08-28. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "B.J. Young player profile". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
  3. ^ a b Weaver, Dan (1995-02-01). "On Paper, Americans Looking Better". The Spokesman-Review. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Former Ace Young dies in car accident". Western Hockey League. 2005-12-05. Archived from the original on 2013-12-03. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
  5. ^ "1997 NHL Entry Draft". Internet Hockey Database. Archived from the original on 2013-11-12. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
  6. ^ "Young to Skate with Red Wings". Daily Sitka Sentinel. 1997-10-06. p. 6. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
  7. ^ "1999-00 Cincinnati Mighty Ducks roster and statistics". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  8. ^ "Red Wings sign Elliott, Young, Suursoo". CNN Sports Illustrated. 2000-08-18. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
  9. ^ Lachmann, John (2001-03-26). "Wanted: Long-Term Goalie". Cincinnati Mighty Ducks. Archived from the original on 2013-12-03. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
  10. ^ Nevala, Matt (2004-10-10). "Familiar face as Aces open camp". Anchorage Daily News. p. C3. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
  11. ^ "US World Junior Roster Announced". USCHO. 1996-12-03. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
  12. ^ "Team USA - WJC-U20 1997 - Forward Stats". Quanthockey. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
  13. ^ "2004 IIHF World Junior Championship". Hockey Canada. Retrieved 2013-12-01. 
  14. ^ "B.J. Young (1977-2005)". American Hockey League. 2005-12-01. Retrieved 2013-08-28. 

External links[edit]