B. N. Goswamy

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B. N. Goswamy
Born 15 August 1933
Sargodha, British India
Other names Brijinder Nath Goswamy
Occupation Art historian
Art critic
Spouse(s) Karuna Goswamy
Children 1 daughter; 1 son
Parent(s) B. L. Goswamy
Awards Padma Shri
Padma Bhushan

Brijinder Nath Goswamy is an Indian art critic, art historian and a former vice chairman of the Sarabhai Foundation of Ahmedabad, which runs the Calico Museum of Textiles.[1] Goswamy is best known for his scholarship on Pahari painting[2] and Indian miniature paintings.[3] He is the author of over 20 books on arts and culture,[1][4] including Sakti Burman: A Private Universe, a monograph on the life and works of Sakti Burman, renowned Bengali painter[5] and Masters of Indian Painting 1100-1900, a treatise on Indian miniature art.[6] The Government of India awarded him the fourth highest civilian award of the Padma Shri in 1998 and followed it up with the third highest honour of the Padma Bhushan in 2008.[7]

Biography[edit]

Museum of Fine Arts, Punjab University, Chandigarh.

Goswamy was born on 15 August 1933 at Sargodha of the Punjab province (presently in Pakistan) of British India,[1] to B.L. Goswamy, a District and Sessions Judge.[8] After the early schooling at various schools in the province, he did his intermediate studies at the Hindu College, Amritsar and secured his master's degree from Punjab University, Chandigarh in 1954. He joined the Indian Administrative Service in 1956 and after working in the Bihar cadre for two years, he resigned from the service in 1958 to continue his studies in art.[9] He returned to Punjab University and did research on Kangra painting and its social backdrop, under the guidance of the renowned historian, Hari Ram Gupta, to obtain a doctoral degree (PhD) in 1961.[1] It is reported that his examiners were Arthur Llewellyn Basham, the Indologist, and the art critic, W.G. Archer.[8]

During the course of his research, he joined Punjab University as member of its faculty of Art History, where he would spend his entire career and eventually superannuate as a professor. While working there, he took a break and worked as a visiting professor at the South Asian Institute of the University of Heidelberg from 1973 till 1981.[1] He also served as a visiting professor at various other international universities such as California, Berkeley, Pennsylvania and Zurich.[8] At Punjab University, he developed the Museum of Fine Arts, as its director,[10] and the museum holds 1200 creations of contemporary Indian art.[11] Besides his academic career, he served as the vice chairman of the Centre for Cultural Resources and Training (CCRT), a nodal agency under the Government of India providing training to educators who are involved in educational programmes on Indian culture.[1] He has been a member of the Governing Committee of the Indian Council of Historical Research (ICHR) and has chaired the Chandigarh Lalit Kala Akademi.[1]

Goswamy is married to Karuna, an art historian, academic and a former professor of Punjab University. The couple has one son and one daughter, Apurva and Malavika.[8] He lives in Chandigarh, Haryana.[3]

Legacy[edit]

Goswamy is considered by many as one of the most prominent scholars of Indian miniature painting.[3] He is known to have specialised knowledge of Pahari painting, a genre of traditional miniature painting originated in the hills of Punjab region.[2] His 1968 article, Pahari Painting: The Family as the Basis of Style,[12] is a study of this genre, where he is reported to have been successful in unearthing the genealogy of renowned miniaturists such as Pandit Seu, Nainsukh and Manaku.[13] He published five books on this topic, Nainsukh of Guler: A Great Indian Painter from a Small Hill-State,[14] Pahari Masters: Court Painters of Northern India[15] Painters at the Sikh Court,[16] Essence of Indian Art[17] and Masters of Indian Painting 1100-1900.[6] Collaborating with Eberhard Fischer, the Padma Shri winning Swiss-based German art historian and the co-author of a few of his books, he has staged a series of shows, under the title, Wonder of the Age, in many parts of the world.[2]

His work, The Spirit of Indian Painting: Close Encounters with 101 Great Works, 1100-1900[18] is a treatise on selected creations from Jain manuscripts to Indian miniatures.[19] He has published 20 books to date, apart from several articles he has published in Indian and international journals and magazines.[1] A Jainesque Sultanate Shahnama and the context of pre-Mughal painting in India,[20] A Place Apart: Painting in Kutch, 1720-1820,[21] Painted visions: The Goenka collection of Indian paintings,[22] Ranga Roopa Gods,Words,Images,[23] The Word is Sacred, Sacred is the Word: The Indian Manuscript Tradition,[24] Domains of Wonder: Selected Masterworks of Indian Painting[25] and I See No Stranger: Sikh Early Art and Devotion,[26] are some of his other notable books. A Layered World is a 40,000-word audio-visual presentation prepared by Goswamy for Chandigarh Lalit Kala Akademi.[27] He also writes a regular column in The Tribune, titled Art n Soul[8] and delivers keynote addresses and lectures, in India and abroad.[28]

Awards and honours[edit]

When Goswamy retired from his academic career, Punjab University made him the Emeritus Professor.[3] He held the Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowship from 1969 to 1970 [29] and the Sarabhai Fellowship in 1994.[1] He was also a Mellon Senior Fellow of the National Humanities Center, North Carolina.[1] The Government of India awarded him the civilian honour of the Padma Shri in 1998.[7] He was again included in the Republic Day Honours list in 2008, this time for the third highest honour of the Padma Bhushan.[30]

Selected bibliography[edit]

  • B. N. Goswamy (September 1968). "Pahari Painting: The Family as the Basis of Style". Marg. XXI (4). 
  • B. N. Goswamy (1975). Painters at the Sikh Court. F. Steiner. p. 146. ISBN 9783515020978. 
  • B.N. Goswamy; Anna L. Dallapiccola (1984). A Place Apart: Painting in Kutch, 1720-1820. Oxford University Press. p. 94. ISBN 978-0195613117. 
  • B. N. Goswamy (1986). Essence of Indian Art. Asian Art Museum of San Francisco. ISBN 9780939117000. 
  • B. N. Goswamy (1988). A Jainesque Sultanate Shahnama and the context of pre-Mughal painting in India (Rietberg series on Indian art). Museum Rietberg. p. 71. ISBN 978-3907070222. 
  • B. N. Goswamy (1999). Painted visions: The Goenka collection of Indian paintings. Lalit Kala Akademi. p. 297. ISBN 978-8187507000. 
  • B. N. Goswamy; Caron Smith (2005). Domains of Wonder: Selected Masterworks of Indian Painting. San Diego Museum of Art. p. 304. ISBN 978-0937108345. 
  • B. N. Goswamy; Caron Smith (2006). I See No Stranger: Sikh Early Art and Devotion. Mapin Publishing. p. 216. ISBN 978-1890206048. 
  • B. N. Goswamy (2008). The Word is Sacred, Sacred is the Word: The Indian Manuscript Tradition. Philip Wilson Publishers. p. 204. ISBN 978-0856676536. 
  • B. N. Goswamy (2010). Ranga Roopa Gods,Words,Images. Niyogi Books. p. 100. ISBN 978-8189738631. 
  • Milo Beach; B. N. Goswamy; Eberhard Fischer (2011). Masters of Indian Painting 1100-1900. University of Washington Press. p. 800. ISBN 9783907077504. 
  • B.N. Goswamy; Eberhard Fischer (2012). Pahari Masters: Court Painters of Northern India. Niyogi Books. p. 392. ISBN 978-8189738464. 
  • B. N. Goswamy; Eberhard Fischer (2012). Nainsukh of Guler: A Great Indian Painter from a Small Hill-State. Niyogi Books. p. 304. ISBN 978-8189738761. 
  • B. N. Goswamy (2014). The Spirit of Indian Painting: Close Encounters with 101 Great Works, 1100-1900. Penguin India. p. 560. ISBN 978-0670086573. 
  • Brijinder Nath Goswamy; Rosa Maria Falva (2015). Rosa Maria Falva, ed. Sakti Burman: A Private Universe. Skira. p. 216. ISBN 978-8857226194. 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Kartik Chandra Dutt (1999). Who's who of Indian Writers, 1999: A-M. Sahitya Akademi. pp. 413 of 1490. ISBN 9788126008735. 
  2. ^ a b c "The master of small things". Times of India. 21 December 2014. Retrieved 25 October 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d "The big world of miniatures". Business Standard. 5 December 2014. Retrieved 25 October 2015. 
  4. ^ "Amazon profile". Amazon. 2015. Retrieved 24 October 2015. 
  5. ^ Brijinder Nath Goswamy; Rosa Maria Falva (2015). Rosa Maria Falva, ed. Sakti Burman: A Private Universe. Skira. p. 216. ISBN 978-8857226194. 
  6. ^ a b Milo Beach; B. N. Goswamy; Eberhard Fischer (2011). Masters of Indian Painting 1100-1900. University of Washington Press. p. 800. ISBN 9783907077504. 
  7. ^ a b "Padma Awards" (PDF). Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India. 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 November 2014. Retrieved 21 July 2015. 
  8. ^ a b c d e "Rejecting babudom for the love of art". The Tribune. 9 August 2003. Retrieved 24 October 2015. 
  9. ^ "Brijinder Nath Goswamy". Roopinder Singh. 2015. Retrieved 25 October 2015. 
  10. ^ Newsletter, East Asian Art and Archaeology, Issues 57-70. University of Michigan Libraries. 1998. 
  11. ^ "Department of Art History and Visual Arts". Punjab University. 2015. Retrieved 25 October 2015. 
  12. ^ B. N. Goswamy (September 1968). "Pahari Painting: The Family as the Basis of Style". Marg. XXI (4). ISBN 9780391024120. 
  13. ^ "Interview". India Seminar. 2015. Retrieved 25 October 2015. 
  14. ^ B. N. Goswamy; Eberhard Fischer (2012). Nainsukh of Guler: A Great Indian Painter from a Small Hill-State. Niyogi Books. p. 304. ISBN 978-8189738761. 
  15. ^ B.N. Goswamy; Eberhard Fischer (2012). Pahari Masters: Court Painters of Northern India. Niyogi Books. p. 392. ISBN 978-8189738464. 
  16. ^ B. N. Goswamy (1975). Painters at the Sikh Court. F. Steiner. p. 146. ISBN 9783515020978. 
  17. ^ B. N. Goswamy (1986). Essence of Indian Art. Asian Art Museum of San Francisco. ISBN 9780939117000. 
  18. ^ B. N. Goswamy (2014). The Spirit of Indian Painting: Close Encounters with 101 Great Works, 1100-1900. Penguin India. p. 560. ISBN 978-0670086573. 
  19. ^ "Whispers from the past". The Hindu. 1 March 2015. Retrieved 25 October 2015. 
  20. ^ B. N. Goswamy (1988). A Jainesque Sultanate Shahnama and the context of pre-Mughal painting in India (Rietberg series on Indian art). Museum Rietberg. p. 71. ISBN 978-3907070222. 
  21. ^ B.N. Goswamy; Anna L. Dallapiccola (1984). A Place Apart: Painting in Kutch, 1720-1820. Oxford University Press. p. 94. ISBN 978-0195613117. 
  22. ^ B. N. Goswamy (1999). Painted visions: The Goenka collection of Indian paintings. Lalit Kala Akademi. p. 297. ISBN 978-8187507000. 
  23. ^ B. N. Goswamy (2010). Ranga Roopa Gods,Words,Images. Niyogi Books. p. 100. ISBN 978-8189738631. 
  24. ^ B. N. Goswamy (2008). The Word is Sacred, Sacred is the Word: The Indian Manuscript Tradition. Philip Wilson Publishers. p. 204. ISBN 978-0856676536. 
  25. ^ B. N. Goswamy; Caron Smith (2005). Domains of Wonder: Selected Masterworks of Indian Painting. San Diego Museum of Art. p. 304. ISBN 978-0937108345. 
  26. ^ B. N. Goswamy; Caron Smith (2006). I See No Stranger: Sikh Early Art and Devotion. Mapin Publishing. p. 216. ISBN 978-1890206048. 
  27. ^ B. N. Goswamy (21 April 2015). A Layered World (Audio Visual presentation). Chandigarh Lalit Kala Akademi. 
  28. ^ "Look at art intently, and with patience". Live Mint. 16 December 2011. Retrieved 25 October 2015. 
  29. ^ "Official list of Jawaharlal Nehru Fellows (1969-present)". Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Fund. 
  30. ^ Darpan, Pratiyogita (March 2008). "Padma Bhushan Awardees". Pratiyogita Darpan. 2 (21). 

External links[edit]