BGR Group

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BGR Group (Barbour, Griffith & Rogers) is a lobbying firm based in Washington DC, three blocks from the White House, and also has an office in London.[1] The firm was founded in 1991 by Ed Rogers and Haley Barbour.[2]

In 2013 the firm was paid $13.7 million for lobbying and its three largest clients were the Republic of India, Ukraine Chevron Corp. and the State of Kazakhstan.[3] The firm employs various former political figures including Ambassador Kurt Volker, Jeffrey Birnbaum, and Gov. Haley Barbour.[4] Rick Kessler, a lobbyist working for BGR Group, was running for a seat in the Maryland House of Delegates in May, 2014.[5]

In 2014 Huffington Post reported that BGR Group was "at the center of [a] lobbyist network" supporting Republican Senator Thad Cochran, while he fought a tight primary election race against Tea Party candidate, Chris McDaniel.[6]

In April 2015, the Government of South Korea retained BGR for public relations and image building.[7][8]

BGR has worked for Alfa-Bank.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BGR About page, http://www.bgrdc.com/about.html
  2. ^ Rogers, Ed (2 July 2014). "Welcome to Obama's post-Obama presidency". Dallas Morning News.
  3. ^ "BGR Group". Barbour Griffith & Rogers. The Center for Responsive Politics. Open Secrets. 2013.
  4. ^ "BGR Group About". BGR Group. BGR.
  5. ^ Yeager, Holly (18 May 2014). "Lobbyists find mixed reception running for office, but a few have won elections". Washington Post.
  6. ^ Blumenthal, Paul (18 Jun 2014). "Washington Lobbyists Pour Money Into Mississippi Senate Race To Fend Off Tea Party". Huffington Post.
  7. ^ Pace, Richard (21 Apr 2015). "BGR Public Relations Firm Hired By South Korea". EPR news site. EverythingPR.
  8. ^ Gale, Alistair (21 Apr 2015). "South Korea Hires PR Agency Ahead of Abe Speech". Wall Street Journal.
  9. ^ Dexter Filkins. "Was There a Connection Between a Russian Bank and the Trump Campaign? A team of computer scientists sifted through records of unusual Web traffic in search of answers". NewYorker.com. Retrieved 12 October 2018.