BK Dinner Baskets

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Burger King Dinner Baskets was a series of product introduced in 1993 by the international fast-food restaurant chain Burger King. The products were designed to add product that would appeal to families and customers looking for a "higher class" meal found in family style restaurants.[1]

History[edit]

Product description[edit]

Varieties included:

Side orders[edit]

  • Choice of Fries or Baked Potato
  • Choice of Cole Slaw or Side Salad

Also, complimentary popcorn was given to customers to eat while waiting for their meal to be brought to their table.

Advertising[edit]

The campaign was created by New York based agency D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles. The original ads were used to promote the Burger King Every Day Value Menu and Burger King Dinner Baskets. The advertising program was designed as part of a back to basics plan by Burger King after a series of disappointing advertising schemes including the failure of its 1980s Where's Herb? campaign. One of the main parts of the plan was to introduce a value menu in response to McDonald's, Taco Bell and Wendy's.[3]

Many of the ads featured Dan Cortese as Dan the Whopper Man, while others included featured clips from rap music artists Kid 'n Play's film House Party. The cross-promotion of the Disney film Aladdin was also advertised under this promotion, as well as Last Action Hero. The last commercials using this campaign was when it promoted The Nightmare Before Christmas.

Naming and trademarks[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stuart Elliot (1993-10-21). "Once Again, Burger King Shops for an Agency". the New York Times. Retrieved 2008-02-06. Indeed, Burger King's belated value-oriented approach marks an about-face after a year spent trying to give the chain, with more than 7,000 company-owned and franchised outlets, a more upscale persona by selling higher-priced fare like dinner baskets and offering table service. 
  2. ^ 14 Fast Food Items You Can't Get Anymore
  3. ^ Theresa Howard (1993-11-01). "Value in driver's seat as Burger King takes new route". Nations Restaurant News. Retrieved 2008-02-06. Having survived such advertising blunders as Herb the Nerd and "sometimes you gotta break the rules" and such strategies as selling Domino's Pizza, Weight Watchers meals and offering table service, Burger King is proceeding along the value and back-to-basics route.