BMC Software

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BMC Software, Inc.
Private
IndustryComputer software
FoundedSeptember 1980; 39 years ago (1980-09)
FounderJohn J. Moores
Dan Cloer
Scott Boulette
HeadquartersHouston, Texas, U.S.
Key people
  • Ayman Sayed
    (CEO)
Products
Websitewww.bmc.com

BMC Software, Inc. is an American enterprise software company. BMC offers SaaS-based and on-premise software solutions and services in areas including cloud computing, IT service management, automation, IT operations, and mainframe. BMC stock was originally traded on NASDAQ under the symbol BMCS and on the New York Stock Exchange with symbol BMC, but the company is now privately held. BMC is a multinational firm operating in North America, South America, Australia, Europe, and Asia and has multiple offices located around the world.[1] The company's international headquarters is located in Houston, Texas, United States.[2][3]


History[edit]

The company was founded in Houston, Texas, by former Shell Oil employees Scott Boulette, John J. Moores, and Dan Cloer, whose surname initials were adopted as the company name BMC Software.[4][5] Moores served as the company's first CEO.[6] The firm primarily wrote software for IBM mainframe computers, the industry standard at the time.[2]

In 1987, Moores was succeeded by Richard A. Hosley II as CEO and President. In July 1988, BMC was re-incorporated in Delaware and went public with an initial public offering for BMC stock.[7][8] The first day of trading was August 12, 1988.[9][10]

Acquisition and privatization by private equity firms[edit]

In May 2013, BMC announced that it was in the process of being acquired by a group of major private equity investment groups for $6.9 billion.[11] The process was completed in September of 2013 and the company is no longer publicly traded.[12]

On October 2, 2018 announced the completion of the acquisition of BMC by KKR, a leading global investment firm. The company was acquired from a private investor group led by Bain Capital Private Equity and Golden Gate Capital together with GIC, Insight Venture Partners, and Elliott Management.[13] KKR also owns Cherwell Software, a competitive software to BMC Software’s Remedy suite of tools. BMC Software in January 2018, had filed a patent infringement against Cherwell, prior to KKR’s interest in BMC Software. Subsequently, the lawsuit has disappeared.[14]

Notable acquisitions[edit]

Company Year Price
Patrol Software 1994 $36 million
Datetools 1997 $60 million
Boole & Babbage 1998 $877m - $1 billion
BGS Systems 1998 $285 million
New Dimension Software 1999 $673 million
Optisystems 2000 $70 million
Remedy (product) 2002 Undisclosed
IT Masters 2003 $42 million
Marimba 2004 $187 million
Identify Software 2006 $151 million
Service Management Partners 2007 Unknown
ProactiveNet 2007 Unknown
RealOps 2007 Unknown
Emprisa Networks 2007 $22 million
BladeLogic 2008 $854 million
ITM Software 2008 Undisclosed
MQSoftware 2009 Undisclosed
Tideway Systems 2009 Undisclosed
Phurnace Software 2010 Undisclosed
GridApp Systems 2010 Undisclosed
Coradiant 2011 Undisclosed
StreamStep 2011 Undisclosed
Numara Software 2012 Undisclosed

Products and services[edit]

BMC Software began as a mainframe-only software vendor, but since the middle 1990s has been developing software to monitor, manage and automate both distributed and mainframe systems.

Directors and staff[edit]

The company was founded by John J. Moores in 1980; Moores was a "former Shell Oil computer specialist ... whose software made Shell's computers more efficient."[15] Richard A. Hosley II was president and chief executive officer of BMC Software, Inc. from October 1987 until April 1990. Shortly after becoming president, Hosley took the company public in 1988. Hosley was succeeded by Max Watson, Jr. in April 1990.[16] Max Watson Jr. was chairman and chief executive officer of BMC Software from April 1990 to January 2001.[17] At one point, he was listed as one of Houston's highest paid executives; in 2000, his salary and bonus was $1.2 million.[18]

In 2001, BMC appointed the company director, Garland Cupp, to the post of chairman, succeeding Max Watson, who quit the post in January 2001.[19] Watson was succeeded as chairman and CEO by BMC's former senior vice president of product management and development, Robert Beauchamp (pron. "Bee-chum"). [9]

As of December 2016, Peter Leav succeeded Bob Beauchamp as president and chief executive officer.[20][21] In October 2019, Ayman Sayed was named as President and CEO of BMC Software.


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "BMC Software, Inc. (BMC)". bizjournals. August 11, 2009. Retrieved August 11, 2009.[dead link]
  2. ^ a b Staff writer (June 6, 1985). "BMC-I.B.M. Suit". The New York Times / Reuters. Retrieved August 9, 2009.
  3. ^ Rogers, Bruce (August 13, 2015). "BMC's Past Near-Death Moment Prepared It For Today's Growth". Forbes.
  4. ^ Bauder, John (January 28, 2015). "Luddy learned from Moores". San Diego Reader.
  5. ^ "Jason Andrew". The CEO Magazine. October 2015. Archived from the original on 2016-12-20. Retrieved 2016-06-28.
  6. ^ "John J. Moores". Bloomberg.
  7. ^ "BMC: Stock Quote & Summary Data". NASDAQ. August 11, 2009. Retrieved August 11, 2009.
  8. ^ "BMC SOFTWARE INC (Form: 10-K, Received: 05/21/2008 17:30:22)". Retrieved September 7, 2009.
  9. ^ a b "BMC Software, Inc. -- Company History". Funding Universe. Retrieved September 7, 2009.
  10. ^ "BMC Software - Stock Quote". Hoover's. Retrieved September 7, 2009.
  11. ^ Goldman, David. (2013-05-06) BMC Software sold for $6.9 billion - May. 6, 2013. Money.cnn.com. Retrieved on 2013-07-26.
  12. ^ Press Release (September 10, 2013). "BMC Software Completes Privatization Transaction". BMC Software. Archived from the original on October 6, 2014. Retrieved October 1, 2014.
  13. ^ "KKR Buys BMC Software". KKR New Media Oct 2, 2018.
  14. ^ "KKR dissolves Cherwell Patent issues with BMC Software". Cloud IP.
  15. ^ Myerson, Allen R. (November 30, 1997). "A New Breed of Wildcatter for the 90's". The New York Times. Retrieved August 9, 2009.
  16. ^ Confessions of a Stock Broker. Littlebrown. 1972. ISBN 978-0-7181-1041-3. OL 7837855M.
  17. ^ "Max P. Watson". Forbes / Forbes.com. August 10, 2009. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved August 10, 2009.
  18. ^ Sixel, L.M. (May 29, 2001). "Houston's top execs in energy -- Oil and gas claims 8 of 10 highest-paid". The Houston Chronicle (chron.com). Archived from the original on March 20, 2006. Retrieved August 10, 2009.
  19. ^ Connell, James (May 2, 2001). "Tech Brief:NEW BMC DIRECTOR". The New York Times. Archived from the original on May 18, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2009.
  20. ^ Lopez, Maribel (December 12, 2016). "BMC Adds Peter Leav As CEO, Prepares For New Growth Chapter". Forbes.
  21. ^ Preimesberger, Chris (December 12, 2016). "BMC Makes Change at Top, Selects Former Polycom CEO". eWeek.

External links[edit]