BMW M62

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
BMW M62 engine
BMW M62B44.jpg
Overview
Production1995–2005
Layout
Configuration90° V8
Displacement3.5–4.8 L (214–293 cu in)
Block materialAluminium
Head materialAluminium
ValvetrainDOHC, with VVT on
M62TU versions
Combustion
Fuel typePetrol
Chronology
PredecessorBMW M60
SuccessorBMW N62

The BMW M62 is a naturally aspirated V8 petrol engine which was produced from 1995 to 2005.[1] A successor to the BMW M60, the M62 features an aluminium engine block[2] and a single row timing chain.[3]

In 1998, a Technical Update included VANOS (variable valve timing) for the intake camshafts.

The S62 engine is the BMW M high performance version of the M62, which was released in the E39 M5.

Design[edit]

Like the BMW M60 engine it replaced, the M62 is a DOHC engine with four valves per cylinder, an aluminium block and aluminium heads. The M62 has fracture-split forged connecting rods,[4] hypereutectic pistons with ferrous coated side skirts. Most of the M62 engines used Alusil for the block material,[5] however some early M62 engines used Nikasil cylinder coating instead.[6][7]

Alusil technology integrates silicon throughout the aluminum cast so that liners or treated bores within this block family are not needed.

The M62 uses a Bosch Motronic 5.2 engine control unit (also called "DME")[8] and a hot wire MAF.[9]

Technical Update[edit]

In 1998, a "Technical Update" was applied to the M62, resulting in the M62TU variants. New features include single-VANOS (variable valve timing for the intake camshaft) and electronic throttle control. The engine management was updated to Motronic ME7.2.[10][11]

Versions[edit]

Figures specified are for European models.[12][13][14][15][16][17]

Engine Displacement Power Torque Redline Year
M62B35 3,498 cc (213.5 cu in) 173 kW (232 hp)
at 5,700 rpm
320 N⋅m (236 lb⋅ft)
at 3,300 rpm
6,200 1996
M62TUB35 183 kW (245 hp)
at 5,800 rpm*
345 N⋅m (254 lb⋅ft)
at 3,800 rpm
1998
M62B44 4,398 cc (268.4 cu in) 210 kW (282 hp)
at 5,700 rpm
420 N⋅m (310 lb⋅ft)
at 3,900 rpm
6,100 1996
M62TUB44 210 kW (282 hp)
at 5,400 rpm**
440 N⋅m (325 lb⋅ft)
at 3,600 rpm
1998
M62B46 4,619 cc (281.9 cu in) 250 kW (335 hp)
at 5,700 rpm
470 N⋅m (347 lb⋅ft)
at 3,800 rpm
1997
M62TUB46 4,619 cc (281.9 cu in) 255 kW (342 hp)
at 5,700 rpm
480 N⋅m (354 lb⋅ft)
at 3,700 rpm
6,500 2001
M62B48 4,837 cc (295.2 cu in) 276 kW (370 hp)
at 6,000 rpm
510 N⋅m (376 lb⋅ft)
at 3,700 rpm
2003
S62B50 4,941 cc (301.5 cu in) 294 kW (394 hp)
at 6,600 rpm
500 N⋅m (369 lb⋅ft)
at 3,800 rpm
7,000 1998

* 175 kW (235 bhp) for E38 7 Series models.
** 216 kW (290 bhp) for 2001-2003 540i models sold in the United States

M62B35[edit]

The M62B35 has a bore of 84 mm (3.3 in) and a stroke of 78.9 mm (3.1 in).[3]

Applications:[18]

M62TUB35[edit]

In 1998, the Technical Update was applied, resulting in the M62TUB35.[3] Versions used in the E39 5 Series application have slightly more power than versions used in the E38 7 Series.

Applications:[18]

M62B44[edit]

The M62B44 has a bore of 92 mm (3.6 in) and a stroke of 82.7 mm (3.26 in).

Applications:[18]

M62B46[edit]

The M62B46 was developed by Alpina, and was designated the F3, based on the M62B44. It has a bore of 93 mm (3.7 in) and a stroke of 85 mm (3.3 in).[19]

Applications:

M62TUB44[edit]

Technical Update version (M62TUB44)

In 1998, the Technical Update was applied, resulting in the M62TUB44. In the United States, power for 2001-2003 540i models was increased to 216 kW (290 bhp).[21][22]

Applications:[18]

M62TUB46[edit]

The M62TUB46 is based on the M62TUB44. With a 10.5mm lift intake and exhaust camshaft. Slightly stronger valve springs and valves. It has a bore of 93 mm (3.7 in) and a stroke of 85 mm (3.3 in).

Applications:[18]

M62B48[edit]

The M62B48 was developed by Alpina, based on the M62TUB44.[24] It has a bore of 93 mm (3.7 in) and a stroke of 89 mm (3.5 in).

Applications:[18]

S62[edit]

BMW S62 Engine
BMW M5 (2002) - Flickr - The Car Spy (16).jpg
Overview
Production1998–2003
Layout
Configuration90° V8
Displacement4.9 L (302 cu in)
Block materialAluminium
Head materialAluminium
ValvetrainDOHC w/ VVT
Combustion
Fuel typePetrol

The BMW S62 engine (full model code S62B50) is the high-performance variant of the M62, which is fitted to the E39 M5 and the E52 Z8. The S62 was BMW's first V8 engine to have double-VANOS (variable valve timing on the intake and exhaust camshafts).[25]

The S62 engine produces 294 kW (394 hp) at 6600 rpm and 500 N⋅m (369 lb⋅ft) at 3800 rpm.[26] The redline is 7000 rpm.[27][28] The bore and stroke are 94 mm (3.7 in) and 89 mm (3.5 in) respectively. This results in a displacement of 4,941 cc (301.5 cu in), compared with the 4,398 cc (268.4 cu in) of the largest M62 engine at the time.[25]

Other differences compared to the M62 include:

As per the M62, the S62 has an aluminium block and head. The S62 was assembled at BMW's Dingolfing plant.[29]

Applications:

Bentley Arnage[edit]

The 1998-2000 Bentley Arnage (Green Label) is powered by a Cosworth-developed twin-turbo version of the M62B44.[36] This engine produces 260 kW (349 bhp) and 569 N⋅m (420 lb⋅ft).[37]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "BMW 8-Zylinder Motor (M62)". bmw-grouparchiv.de. Retrieved 19 June 2017.
  2. ^ "BMW World - Nikasil". www.usautoparts.net. Archived from the original on 12 August 2014.
  3. ^ a b c "BMW M62 engine". www.usautoparts.net. Archived from the original on 2 November 2013.
  4. ^ "BMW M62 Engine". www.bmwpower.co.za. Archived from the original on 2014-03-05.
  5. ^ "BMW M60 and M62 V8 Engines". www.unixnerd.demon.co.uk. Retrieved 24 June 2017.
  6. ^ "Material changeover V8 crankcase M60, M62- p1". www.bmw-planet.com. Archived from the original on 2016-03-03.
  7. ^ "Material changeover V8 crankcase M60, M62- p2". www.bmw-planet.com. Archived from the original on 2016-03-03.
  8. ^ "BMW M60 M62 and M62TU Engine". www.meeknet.co.uk. Retrieved 21 June 2017.
  9. ^ "E30 BMW M62/M60 V8 Swap". www.rtsauto.com. Retrieved 25 August 2012.
  10. ^ M62TU Training Manual (PDF). BMW AG. p. 15. Retrieved 21 June 2017.
  11. ^ "BMW M62B44/M62TUB44 Engine". www.mywikimotors.com. Retrieved 21 June 2017.
  12. ^ Brochure for 5 Series (in German). BMW AG. 1998. p. 40. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  13. ^ Operating manual for 5 Series. BMW AG. July 1998. p. 212. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  14. ^ Brochure for 5 Series. BMW AG. 2003. p. 18. Retrieved 7 April 2017.
  15. ^ Brochure for X5 (in German). BMW AG. 2001. p. 46. Retrieved 10 April 2017.
  16. ^ "ALPINA Automobiles based on BMW 5 Series E39". www.alpina-automobiles.com. Retrieved 10 April 2017.
  17. ^ "20 Jahre BMW Alpina B10 V8 E39: Jubiläum in Buchloe". BimmerToday Deutschland. 31 January 2017. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  18. ^ a b c d e f "Engine specifications for M62 engines". www.bmwheaven.com. Retrieved 2012-08-25.
  19. ^ "20 Jahre BMW Alpina B10 V8 E39: Jubiläum in Buchloe" [20 years of the BMW Alpina B10 V8 E39: Anniversary in Buchloe]. BimmerToday Deutschland (in German). 31 January 2017. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  20. ^ "BMW 5 Series E39: ALPINA Automobiles". www.alpina-automobiles.com. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  21. ^ "540i 6-speed sedan Technical Data". www.bmwusa.com. Archived from the original on 18 December 2001.
  22. ^ "BMW 540i (2003) full detailed specifications listing". www.automobile-catalog.com. Retrieved 22 June 2017.
  23. ^ "2004 Morgan Aero 8 GTN for sale". www.finecars.cc. Retrieved 21 June 2017.
  24. ^ "2003 Alpina B10 V8 S Switch-Tronic specifications & performance data review". www.automobile-catalog.com. Retrieved 21 June 2017.
  25. ^ a b c d "BMW S62 Engine". www.usautoparts.net. Archived from the original on 16 June 2012.
  26. ^ "Engine specifications for Motorsport engines". www.bmwheaven.com. Retrieved 25 August 2012.
  27. ^ "Coming to America: The BMW M5". www.roadandtrack.com. Retrieved 15 June 2017.
  28. ^ "BMW History: E39 M5". www.bmwblog.com. Retrieved 24 June 2017.
  29. ^ a b "BMW E39 M5". www.bmwmcars.net. Archived from the original on 10 September 2012.
  30. ^ "25 years of the BMW M5". www.evo.co.uk. Retrieved 25 August 2012.
  31. ^ "FAQ E39 M5". www.bmwmregistry.com. Retrieved 24 June 2017.
  32. ^ "BMW S62 Engine". www.mywikimotors.com. Retrieved 24 June 2017.
  33. ^ "Engine Guide BMW S62". drive-my.com. Retrieved 24 June 2017.
  34. ^ "BMW M62/S62". www.bmw-tech.org. Retrieved 24 June 2017.
  35. ^ "BMW S62 engine". www.v8engine.co.za. Retrieved 24 June 2017.
  36. ^ "2000 Bentley Arnage". www.motortrend.com. Retrieved 9 August 2017.
  37. ^ "History of the Bentley Arnage". www.nfcperformance.com. Archived from the original on 9 August 2017. Retrieved 9 August 2017.