BMX XXX

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BMX XXX
BMX XXX Coverart.png
North American Xbox cover art
Developer(s) Z-Axis
Publisher(s) AKA Acclaim
Platform(s) Nintendo GameCube, PlayStation 2, Xbox
Release date(s) Xbox
  • NA: November 10, 2002
  • EU: December 6, 2002
PlayStation 2
  • NA: November 16, 2002
  • EU: December 5, 2003
GameCube
  • NA: November 24, 2002
  • EU: February 7, 2003
Genre(s) Racing, sports (BMX)
Mode(s) multiplayer

BMX XXX is a 2002 video game published by Acclaim Entertainment under their AKA Acclaim banner for the Xbox, Nintendo GameCube and PlayStation 2 and developed by Z-Axis. While primarily a BMX-based action sports title, it earned most of its notoriety for containing nudity, foul language and adult humor. The game allows the player to create female characters that are fully topless and view live-action video clips of real life strippers, also with bare breasts. Consequently, BMX XXX was initially denied classification in Australia. In North America, while the game is available uncensored on the GameCube and Xbox, all naked breasts are covered in the PlayStation 2 version. While the adult content garnered a great deal of publicity for the game, it was almost entirely negative, and it was eventually released to mediocre reviews and poor sales.

Production[edit]

BMX XXX builds on the earlier work done by Z-Axis on Dave Mirra Freestyle BMX, their previous BMX title featuring and endorsed by professional BMX rider Dave Mirra. During development of the new game, publisher Acclaim Entertainment decided to style the game after a raunchy sex comedy movie. It is commonly believed that the origins of this decision came when Acclaim saw what was shaping up to be an extremely subpar game, and so, in an effort to salvage the time and money already invested in it, they decided to add the vulgar humor and naked women in an effort to muster up publicity and hopefully turn that into sales.[1] When Mirra found out about the content in the game, he refused to endorse the product and took legal action against publisher Acclaim in order to prevent any further implication of his involvement in the game.[2] Mirra was successful in getting the courts to block Acclaim from using his name in association with the game, and the title was then shortened to its final name, BMX XXX.[2]

Reception[edit]

Reception
Review scores
Publication Score
GC PS2 Xbox
AllGame N/A N/A 2/5 stars[3]
EGM N/A N/A 3/10[4]
Eurogamer N/A N/A 4/10[5]
Game Informer 7.75/10[6] 7.75/10[7] 7.75/10[8]
GamePro N/A 3/5 stars[9] 3/5 stars[10]
GameSpot 5.4/10[11] 5.4/10[12] 5.4/10[12]
GameSpy 2.5/5 stars[13] N/A 4/5 stars[14]
GameZone N/A 6.2/10[15] N/A
IGN 6.8/10[16] 6/10[17] 6.8/10[18]
Nintendo Power 3.5/5[19] N/A N/A
OPM (US) N/A 1.5/5 stars[20] N/A
OXM N/A N/A 7.4/10[21]
Entertainment Weekly C−[22] C−[22] C−[22]
Playboy 77%[23] 77%[23] 77%[23]
Aggregate score
Metacritic 60/100[24] 54/100[25] 58/100[26]

The game received "mixed" reviews on all platforms according to video game review aggregator Metacritic.[24][26][25]

Controversy[edit]

At the time of BMX XXX's release, sexual humor and nudity were not widely explored themes in mainstream video games.[2] As a result, Acclaim's attempt to drum up publicity for the game was a rousing success, although the publicity achieved was not positive. Television news outlets reported that Wal-Mart, Toys R Us and most major IEMA retailers in the United States declined to carry the game in their stores due to the nudity. Then, Sony Computer Entertainment of America refused to allow the game to be published for the PlayStation 2 until the nudity was censored. In the end, sales were abysmal: under 100,000 copies were sold across all three platforms. The game was not greeted with controversy in Europe, but it was not met with sales success either. In Australia, it was sold with the sexual content removed entirely.[27] BMX XXX, along with several other poorly performing titles, contributed to Acclaim Entertainment filing for bankruptcy in 2004.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ IGN staff (May 22, 2002). "E3 2002: Dave Mirra BMX XXX". IGN. Retrieved March 17, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c IGN staff (February 14, 2003). "Dave Mirra Sues Acclaim". Yahoo! Games (IGN). Archived from the original on January 9, 2008. Retrieved November 27, 2007. 
  3. ^ Scott Alan Mariott. "BMX XXX (Xbox) - Review". AllGame. Archived from the original on November 15, 2014. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  4. ^ EGM staff (February 2003). "BMX XXX (Xbox)". Electronic Gaming Monthly (163): 152. Archived from the original on January 31, 2004. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  5. ^ Tom Bramwell (November 29, 2002). "BMX XXX (Xbox)". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on March 11, 2003. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  6. ^ Matt Helgeson (February 2003). "BMX XXX (GC)". Game Informer (118): 101. Archived from the original on November 13, 2004. Retrieved March 17, 2016. 
  7. ^ Matt Helgeson (January 2003). "BMX XXX (PS2)". Game Informer (117): 92. Archived from the original on August 2, 2008. Retrieved March 17, 2016. 
  8. ^ Justin Leeper (January 2003). "BMX XXX (Xbox)". Game Informer (117): 106. Archived from the original on November 24, 2003. Retrieved March 17, 2016. 
  9. ^ Dan Elektro (December 11, 2002). "BMX XXX Review for PS2 on GamePro.com". GamePro. Archived from the original on February 12, 2005. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  10. ^ Tokyo Drifter (December 11, 2002). "BMX XXX Review for Xbox on GamePro.com". GamePro. Archived from the original on February 12, 2005. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  11. ^ Jeff Gerstmann (November 26, 2002). "BMX XXX Review (GC)". GameSpot. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  12. ^ a b Jeff Gerstmann (November 11, 2002). "BMX XXX Review (PS2, Xbox)". GameSpot. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  13. ^ Bryn Williams (December 11, 2002). "GameSpy: BMX XXX (GCN)". GameSpy. Archived from the original on December 1, 2005. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  14. ^ Steve Steinberg (December 11, 2002). "GameSpy: BMX XXX (Xbox)". GameSpy. Archived from the original on January 8, 2006. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  15. ^ Nick Valentino (December 4, 2002). "BMX XXX - PS2 - Review". GameZone. Archived from the original on October 4, 2008. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  16. ^ Matt Casamassina (December 2, 2002). "BMX XXX (GCN)". IGN. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  17. ^ Aaron Boulding (November 13, 2002). "BMX XXX (PS2)". IGN. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  18. ^ Aaron Boulding (November 12, 2002). "BMX XXX Review (Xbox)". IGN. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  19. ^ "BMX XXX". Nintendo Power. 165: 155. February 2003. 
  20. ^ Todd Zuniga (February 2003). "BMX XXX". Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine: 101. Archived from the original on May 25, 2004. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  21. ^ "BMX XXX". Official Xbox Magazine: 64. February 2003. 
  22. ^ a b c Dalton Ross (November 29, 2002). "Sleazy Rider (BMX XXX Review)". Entertainment Weekly (684): 113. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  23. ^ a b c Scott Steinberg (November 15, 2002). "BMX XXX". Playboy. Archived from the original on December 16, 2002. Retrieved March 18, 2016. 
  24. ^ a b "BMX XXX for GameCube Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved March 17, 2016. 
  25. ^ a b "BMX XXX for PlayStation 2 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved March 17, 2016. 
  26. ^ a b "BMX XXX for Xbox Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved March 17, 2016. 
  27. ^ Game Power Australia Team (November 8, 2002). "Acclaim Australia: BMX XXX Interview". Game Power Australia. Archived from the original on December 12, 2007. Retrieved November 27, 2007. 

External links[edit]