B visa

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B1/B2 visa for an Argentinian citizen

A B visa is one of a category of non-immigrant visas issued by the United States government to foreign citizens seeking entry for a temporary period. The two types of B visa are the B-1 visa, issued to those seeking entry for business purposes, and the B-2 visa, issued to those seeking entry for tourism or other non-business purposes. In practice, the two visa categories are usually combined together and issued as a "B-1/B-2 visa" valid for a temporary visit for either business or pleasure, or a combination of the two. Citizens of certain countries do not usually need to obtain a visa for these purposes.

Acceptable and prohibited uses of a B-1 or B-2 visa[edit]

Acceptable uses of a B-1 visa[edit]

Under the category of temporary visitor for business, a B-1 visa may be used to enter the U.S. to engage in any of the following activities.[1]

  • Hold business meetings[2]
  • Perform certain business functions as a member of the board of directors of a U.S. corporation[3]
  • Purchase supplies or materials
  • Interview and hire staff
  • Negotiate contracts, sign contracts, or take orders for products manufactured outside the United States[4][2]
  • Attend a convention, meeting, trade show, or business event for scientific, educational, professional, or business purposes[4][2]
  • Settle an estate[5]
  • Perform independent research[4][2]
  • Receive practical medical experience and medical instruction under the supervision and direction of faculty physicians at a U.S. medical school's hospital as part of a third-year or fourth-year internship as long as the visitor is a studying at a foreign medical school and the visitor is not compensated by the hospital without remuneration from the hospital[3]
  • Observe U.S. medical practices and consult with medical colleagues on techniques, as long as the visitor is a medical doctor, the visitor receives no compensation from a U.S. source, and the visitor does not provide patient care while in the U.S.[3]
  • Take photographs, as long as the visitor is a professional photographer and the visitor receives no compensation from a U.S. source[3]
  • Record music, as long as the visitor is a musician, the recording will be distributed and sold only outside the U.S., and the visitor will give no public performances[3]
  • Create art, as long as the visitor is a creative artist, the visitor is not under contract with a U.S. employer, and the visitor does not intend to regularly sell such artwork in the U.S.[3]
  • Perform certain professional services[6]
  • Perform as a professional entertainer as part of a cultural exchange program performed before a nonpaying audience and funded by visitor's country[2]
  • Perform as a professional entertainer as part of a competition for which there is no compensation other than travel expenses or, in certain limited instances, a prize[2]
  • Perform work as crew on a private yacht that sails out of a foreign home port and cruises in U.S. waters[2]
  • Perform services on behalf of a foreign-based employer as a jockey, sulky driver, horse trainer, or horse groomer[3]
  • Compete in a particular athletic competition[4] with the only compensation being prize money as long as the prize money is not the recipient's primary source of income[2]
  • Try out for a professional sports team[4] as long as the visitor is not compensated other than reimbursement of travel expenses[2]
  • Participate in an athletic tournament or athletic sporting event as a professional athlete, as long as the visitor's only compensation is prize money, the visitor's principal place of business or activity is outside the U.S., the visitor's primary source of income is outside the U.S., and the visitor is either part of an international sports league or the sporting activities involved have an international dimension[3]
  • Survey potential sites for a business[4]
  • Perform as a lecturer or speaker[4]
  • Work for a foreign exhibitor in connection with exhibits at international fairs or international exhibits, as long as the visitor's employment responsibilities are primarily outside the U.S.[2]
  • Install, service, or repair commercial or industrial equipment or machinery that was sold by a non-U.S. company to a U.S. buyer when specifically required by the purchase contract; construction work is not allowed[4][2]
  • Perform a minor amount of volunteer services, excluding construction, for a religious organization or a nonprofit charitable organization, as long as volunteering is not the primary purpose of entering the U.S.[2]
  • Participate in a training program that is not designed primarily to provide employment[4]
  • Observe how a business operates or how professional activities are conducted[2]
  • Seek investments in the U.S., without actually performing productive labor or actively participating in the management of a business[2]
  • Participate in Peace Corps training as a volunteer or under contract[2]
  • Participate in the United Nations Institute for Training and Research internship program, as long a foreign government does not employ the visitor[2]
  • Drill for oil on the Outer Continental Shelf[2]
  • As a minister of religion, engage in an evangelical tour, as long as the visitor does not intend to take an appointment with any one church and the visitor will be supported by offerings contributed at each evangelical meeting[3]
  • As a minister of religion, temporarily exchange pulpits with U.S. ministers of religion, as long as the visitor will continue to be reimbursed by a foreign church and will not be compensated by the U.S. church[3]
  • Perform missionary work, religious instruction, religious aid to the elderly or needy, or religious proselytizing as a member of a religious denomination, as long as the work does not involve the selling of articles, the solicitation of donation, the acceptance of donations, administrative work, or is a substitute for ordinary labor for hire, and the visitor will not be compensated from U.S. sources other than an allowance or other reimbursement for travel expenses incidental to the temporary stay[3]
  • Participating in an organized project conducted by a recognized religious or nonprofit charitable organization that benefits U.S. local communities, as long as the visitor is a member of, and has a commitment to, the particular organization, the visitor receives no compensation from a U.S. source other than reimbursement of travel expenses[3]
  • Work as a personal employee or a domestic employee of an employer who seeks admission into, or who is already in, the United States in B, E, F, H, I, J, L, M, O, P, Q, or R non-immigrant status, if and only if the employee has been employed outside the U.S. in a similar capacity prior to the date the employer enters the U.S., the employee has a residence outside the U.S. that the employee has no intention of abandoning, the employer compensates the employee based on the prevailing wage, and the employer provides the employee free room and board.[7][8]
  • Work as a personal employee or a domestic employee of a U.S. citizen employer, if and only if the employer ordinarily resides outside the U.S.; the employer is traveling to the U.S. temporarily; the employer is subject to frequent international transfers of at least two years; the employer will reside in the U.S. for no more than four year as a condition of employment; the employer has regularly employed a domestic employee in the same capacity while outside the U.S.; the employee has a minimum of one year of experience in the same capacity; the employer provides the employee with the prevailing wage, room, board, and round-trip transportation; and the employee has a residence outside the U.S. that the employee has no intention of abandoning.[9][10]

Acceptable uses of a B-2 visa[edit]

Under the category of temporary visitor for pleasure, a B-2 visa can be used to enter the U.S. to engage in any of the following activities.

  • Travel within the U.S.[3]
  • Visit family or friends
  • Participate in a convention, a conference, or a convocation of a fraternal, social, or service nature[3]
  • Obtain medical treatment, other than giving birth, as long as the visitor has the means to pay for the medical treatment[3][11]
  • Enroll in a short, recreational course of study, as long as it is not credited toward a degree[3]
  • Participate in an event, talent show, or a contest as an amateur, as long the visitor is not typically compensated for such participation and the visitor does not actually receive payment, other than reimbursement of travel expenses[3]
  • Enter as a dependent of an alien member of any branch of the U.S. Armed Forces temporarily assigned for duty in the U.S.[3]
  • Accompany a person with either a D-1 visa or a D-2 visa with the sole purpose of accompanying the person[3]
  • Enter with the intent of becoming engaged, meeting the family of a fiancé, making arrangements for a wedding, or renewing a relationship with a fiancé[3]
  • Enter with the intent of marrying a U.S. citizen and then return to a residence outside the U.S. after the marriage[3]
  • Accompany a spouse or child who is a U.S. citizen on a temporary visit to the U.S.[3]
  • Enter as a cohabiting (unmarried) partner of a non-immigrant visa holder if the partner is not otherwise eligible for derivative status under the partner's visa classification.[3]

Prohibited uses[edit]

A person who enters the U.S. with a B-1 visa or a B-2 visa is prohibited from engaging in any of the following activities.

  • Employment, whether paid or unpaid (some exceptions apply)
  • Receive education which credits to a degree
  • Arrive in the U.S. as a part of a crew of a ship or an aircraft
  • Work as a journalist or other information media
  • Perform before a paying audience
  • Live permanently or long-term in the U.S.
  • Manage a business located in the U.S.[4]
  • Start a new branch, subsidiary, or affiliate of a foreign employer[2]
  • Enter the U.S. with the purpose of performing emergency response services[2]
  • Enter the U.S. for the purpose of giving birth[11]

Requirement to overcome presumption of intending immigrant[edit]

Under section 214(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, a foreigner must prove to the satisfaction of the Consular officer his or her intent to return to his home country after visiting the United States. The act specifically states:[12]

Every alien (other than a nonimmigrant described in subparagraph (L) or (V) of section 101(a)(15), and other than a nonimmigrant described in any provision of section 101(a)(15)(H)(i) except subclause (b1) of such section) shall be presumed to be an immigrant until he establishes to the satisfaction of the consular officer, at the time of application for a visa, and the immigration officers, at the time of application for admission, that he is entitled to a nonimmigrant status under section 101(a)(15).

In practice, this means that consular officers have wide discretion to deny a visa application. Once refused, there is no judicial or other means to challenge a visa decision. The foreigner, however, is free to apply for a visa again, particularly if circumstances have changed that might show to the consular officer that the applicant overcomes the presumption of being an intending immigrant.[13]

Cost[edit]

All applicants for a B-1 and/or B-2 visa must pay an application fee, US$160 as of 2020.[14] If the application is approved, individuals who are nationals of certain countries must pay an issuance fee, which varies by nationality and is typically based on reciprocity. For some countries the issuance fee also varies depending on the desired visa validity, number of entries and visa subtype (B-1, B-2 or combined B-1/B-2).[15]

As of March 2020, only nationals of the following countries must pay the issuance fee.[15]

Country Issuance fee (USD) Entries Visa validity Notes
 Cameroon 240 multiple 1 year
 Central African Republic 40 multiple 1 year
 Comoros 0 1 2 months
307 multiple 1 year
 Congo 0 multiple 6 months For B-1 only.
40 multiple 6 months For B-2 only.
 French nationals in New Caledonia and Wallis and Futuna 100 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
 Kenya 40 multiple 5 years
 Kyrgyzstan 45 multiple 5 years
 Libya 10 1 3 months
 Malawi 0 1 3 months
60 multiple 6 months
140 multiple 1 year
 Mauritania 20 multiple 1 year
 Mozambique 0 3 3 months For B-1 or B-2.
0 1 3 months For B-1/B-2 only.
20 multiple 3 months For B-1/B-2 only.
 Myanmar 0 1 3 months For B-2 or B-1/B-2.
440 multiple 1 year For B-1 only.
 Nauru 0 multiple 5 years For B-1 only.
32 1 3 months For B-2 only.
 Nigeria 110 multiple 2 years
 Papua New Guinea 0 1 1 month
163 multiple 1 year
 Turkmenistan 0 multiple 3 months
115 multiple 6 months
355 multiple 1 year
 Yemen 30 multiple 1 year

History[edit]

Before 1994, there was no application fee, and only the issuance fee was charged, varying by nationality based on reciprocity.[16] In 1994, the application fee was introduced for all applicants, in addition to the reciprocal issuance fee, to pay for the more costly machine-readable visas, which replaced the older stamped visas around that time.[17] The application fee was initially US$20, and has increased several times since then.

Changes in application fee
Date Application fee (USD)
16 May 1994[17] 20
1 February 1998[18] 45
1 June 2002[19] 65
1 November 2002[20] 100
1 January 2008[21] 131
4 June 2010[22] 140
13 April 2012[23] 160

Validity period and duration of stay[edit]

US B visa validity period per country
  United States
  10 years
  5 years
  2–4 years
  12–15 months
  3–6 months
  1 month–5 years (depending on issuance fee or visa subtype)

As with other non-immigrant U.S. visas, a B-1/B-2 visa has a validity period (from 1 month to 10 years), allows for one, two, three or multiple entries into the U.S., and elicits a period of stay (maximum 6 months) recorded by the Customs and Border Protection officer at the port of entry on the individual's form I-94. The validity period determines how long the visa may be used to enter the U.S., while the period of stay determines how long the person may stay in the U.S. after each entry.

Validity periods per country are listed in the U.S. Department of State Visa Reciprocity Tables and vary from 1 month for Papua New Guinea (with no issuance fee), 1 year for Vietnam, 2 years for Nigeria, 3 years for Russia, and 5 years for Ecuador, to 10 years for China, India, Israel, Philippines, and most countries in the Americas and Europe. For some countries, longer validity periods are available for higher issuance fees or for B-1 only.

Periods of stay for B-1 visas may be granted initially for a duration long enough to allow the visitor to conduct their business, up to a maximum of 6 months, and can be extended for another 6 months;[24] stays with B-1 visas are usually granted for three months or less, while stays with B-2 visas are generally granted for six months.[25] Extensions are possible, provided the individual has not violated the conditions of admission.[26]

A Border Crossing Card (BCC), also called a laser visa, has a 10-year validity and functions as both a BCC and a B-1/B-2 visitor's visa. The BCC is only issued to nationals of Mexico who apply for a visa inside Mexico.[27]

Validity of B visas by nationality, as of March 2020:[15][28]

Country Issuance fee (USD) Entries Validity Notes
Afghanistan 0 multiple 1 year
Albania 0 multiple 3 years
Algeria 0 multiple 2 years
Andorra 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Angola 0 multiple 2 years
Antigua and Barbuda 0 multiple 10 years
Argentina 0 multiple 10 years
Armenia 0 multiple 10 years
Australia 0 multiple 5 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Austria 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Azerbaijan 0 multiple 1 year
Bahamas 0 multiple 10 years May also enter without a visa if traveling directly from the country through airport preclearance and holding a police certificate showing no criminal record.
Bahrain 0 multiple 5 years
Bangladesh 0 multiple 5 years
Barbados 0 multiple 10 years
Belarus 0 multiple 1 year
Belgium 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Belize 0 multiple 10 years
Benin 0 multiple 3 years
Bhutan 0 1 3 months
Bolivia 0 multiple 10 years
Bosnia and Herzegovina 0 multiple 10 years
Botswana 0 multiple 10 years
Brazil 0 multiple 10 years
Brunei 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Bulgaria 0 multiple 10 years
Burkina Faso 0 multiple 5 years
Burundi 0 1 3 months
Cambodia 0 2 3 months
Cameroon 240 multiple 1 year
Canada 0 multiple 10 years May also enter without a visa.
Cape Verde 0 multiple 5 years
Central African Republic 40 multiple 1 year
Chad 0 1 3 months
Chile 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
China 0 multiple 10 years Electronic Visa Update System registration is required.
Colombia 0 multiple 10 years
Comoros 0 1 2 months
307 multiple 1 year
Congo 0 multiple 6 months For B-1 only.
40 multiple 6 months For B-2 only.
Costa Rica 0 multiple 10 years
Croatia 0 multiple 10 years
Cuba 0 1 3 months For B-2 or B-1/B-2.
0 1 6 months For B-1 only.
Cyprus 0 multiple 10 years
Czech Republic 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Democratic Republic of the Congo 0 multiple 3 months
Denmark 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Djibouti 0 multiple 1 year
Dominica 0 multiple 10 years
Dominican Republic 0 multiple 10 years
East Timor 0 2 3 months
Ecuador 0 multiple 5 years
Egypt 0 multiple 5 years
El Salvador 0 multiple 10 years
Equatorial Guinea 0 multiple 5 years
Eritrea 0 1 3 months
Estonia 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Eswatini 0 multiple 10 years
Ethiopia 0 multiple 2 years For holders of diplomatic or official passports, visa validity is 1 year.
Fiji 0 multiple 10 years
Finland 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
France 0 multiple 10 years For nationals of France in New Caledonia and Wallis and Futuna, issuance fee is US$100. All nationals of France may also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Gabon 0 multiple 5 years
Gambia 0 multiple 5 years
Georgia 0 multiple 10 years
Germany 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Ghana 0 multiple 5 years
Greece 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Grenada 0 multiple 10 years
Guatemala 0 multiple 10 years
Guinea 0 multiple 3 years
Guinea-Bissau 0 multiple 15 months
Guyana 0 multiple 10 years
Haiti 0 multiple 5 years
Honduras 0 multiple 10 years
Hong Kong 0 multiple 10 years
Hungary 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Iceland 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
India 0 multiple 10 years
Indonesia 0 multiple 5 years
Iran 0 1 3 months
Iraq 0 multiple 1 year
Ireland 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Israel 0 multiple 10 years
Italy 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Ivory Coast 0 multiple 1 year
Jamaica 0 multiple 10 years
Japan 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Jordan 0 multiple 5 years
Kazakhstan 0 multiple 10 years For B-1/B-2 for a religious event, 1 entry and validity of 3 months. For B-1/B-2 for volunteer work, multiple entries and validity of 5 years.
Kenya 40 multiple 5 years
Kiribati 0 multiple 4 years
Kosovo 0 multiple 3 years
Kuwait 0 multiple 10 years
Kyrgyzstan 45 multiple 5 years
Laos 0 1 3 months
Latvia 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Lebanon 0 multiple 5 years
Lesotho 0 multiple 10 years
Liberia 0 multiple 1 year
Libya 10 1 3 months
Liechtenstein 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Lithuania 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Luxembourg 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Macau 0 multiple 10 years For holders of a travel permit instead of a passport, visa validity is 5 years.
Madagascar 0 multiple 3 months
Malawi 0 1 3 months
60 multiple 6 months
140 multiple 1 year
Malaysia 0 multiple 10 years
Maldives 0 multiple 10 years
Mali 0 multiple 5 years
Malta 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Marshall Islands 0 1 3 months May also enter without a visa.
Mauritania 20 multiple 1 year
Mauritius 0 multiple 10 years
Mexico 0 multiple 10 years
Micronesia 0 2 3 months May also enter without a visa.
Moldova 0 multiple 10 years
Monaco 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Mongolia 0 multiple 10 years
Montenegro 0 multiple 3 years
Morocco 0 multiple 10 years
Mozambique 0 3 3 months For B-1 or B-2.
0 1 3 months For B-1/B-2 only.
20 multiple 3 months For B-1/B-2 only.
Myanmar 0 1 3 months For B-2 or B-1/B-2.
440 multiple 1 year For B-1 only.
Namibia 0 multiple 5 years
Nauru 0 multiple 5 years For B-1 only.
32 1 3 months For B-2 only.
Nepal 0 multiple 5 years
Netherlands 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
New Zealand 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Nicaragua 0 multiple 10 years
Niger 0 multiple 1 year
Nigeria 110 multiple 2 years
North Korea 0 2 3 months
North Macedonia 0 multiple 10 years
Norway 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Oman 0 multiple 10 years
Pakistan 0 multiple 5 years
Palau 0 2 3 months May also enter without a visa.
Palestine 0 multiple 3 years
Panama 0 multiple 10 years
Papua New Guinea 0 1 1 month
163 multiple 1 year
Paraguay 0 multiple 10 years
Peru 0 multiple 10 years
Philippines 0 multiple 10 years
Poland 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Portugal 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Qatar 0 multiple 10 years
Romania 0 multiple 10 years
Russia 0 multiple 3 years
Rwanda 0 multiple 10 years
Saint Kitts and Nevis 0 multiple 10 years
Saint Lucia 0 multiple 10 years
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 0 multiple 10 years
Samoa 0 multiple 10 years
San Marino 0 multiple 5 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
São Tomé and Príncipe 0 multiple 6 months
Saudi Arabia 0 multiple 5 years
Senegal 0 multiple 10 years
Serbia 0 multiple 10 years
Seychelles 0 multiple 10 years
Sierra Leone 0 multiple 3 years
Singapore 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Slovakia 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Slovenia 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Solomon Islands 0 multiple 5 years
Somalia 0 1 3 months
South Africa 0 multiple 10 years
South Korea 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
South Sudan 0 2 3 months
Spain 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Sri Lanka 0 multiple 5 years
Sudan 0 1 3 months For B-2 or B-1/B-2.
0 multiple 1 year For B-1 only.
Suriname 0 multiple 5 years
Sweden 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Switzerland 0 multiple 10 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Syria 0 multiple 3 months
Taiwan 0 multiple 5 years May also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Tajikistan 0 multiple 1 year
Tanzania 0 multiple 1 year
Thailand 0 multiple 10 years
Togo 0 multiple 3 years
Tonga 0 multiple 10 years
Trinidad and Tobago 0 multiple 10 years
Tunisia 0 multiple 10 years
Turkey 0 multiple 10 years
Turkmenistan 0 multiple 3 months
115 multiple 6 months
355 multiple 1 year
Tuvalu 0 multiple 10 years
Uganda 0 multiple 2 years
Ukraine 0 multiple 10 years
United Arab Emirates 0 multiple 10 years
United Kingdom 0 multiple 10 years For British Overseas Territories citizens (BOTCs) of Saint Helena, multiple entries and validity of 5 years. For BOTCs of the Pitcairn Islands, 2 entries and validity of 3 months. BOTCs of Bermuda may also enter without a visa. BOTCs of the British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands and Turks and Caicos Islands may also enter without a visa if traveling directly from the territory and holding a police certificate showing no criminal record. British citizens may also enter by land without a visa, or by air or sea with ESTA.
Uruguay 0 multiple 10 years
Uzbekistan 0 multiple 1 year
Vanuatu 0 multiple 5 years
Vatican City 0 multiple 5 years
Venezuela 0 multiple 10 years
Vietnam 0 multiple 1 year
Yemen 30 multiple 1 year
Zambia 0 multiple 3 years
Zimbabwe 0 multiple 1 year
stateless 0 2 3 months

Electronic Visa Update System (EVUS)[edit]

A 10-year United States B visa issued to a Chinese citizen. The annotation indicates that Electronic Visa Update System (EVUS) enrolment is needed before travel.

On March 15, 2016, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) announced that starting from 29 November 2016, all holders of Chinese passports who also hold 10-year B visas are required to enroll in the Electronic Visa Update System (EVUS)[29] before travelling to the United States via land, air or sea. The EVUS is designed for visa holders to update any changes to their basic biographic and employment information at the time of their visa applications. Similar to the ESTA, each EVUS registration is valid for a period of 2 years or until the holder's passport expiration date, whichever comes first. Currently, this system can be used free of charge and no time frame exists for when the US$8 cost recovery fee will be imposed by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Holders of EVUS can travel to the U.S. for unlimited times providing that their EVUS registration and visa remain valid.[30][31]

The requirement applies to any holder of a Chinese passport and B visa with a 10-year validity. It also applies to holders of non-citizen travel documents issued by other countries, such as a refugee travel document and certificate of identity, whose nationality is Chinese. It does not apply, however, to holders of HKSAR passports and MSAR passports, holders of B visas with a validity shorter than 10 years, and holders of other types of visas. The CBP and DHS are seeking to expand the EVUS to other nationalities in the future.[32]

EVUS was officially launched on October 31, 2016 for early enrollments. Upon launch, CBP announced that the enrollment fee will be suspended until further notice.[33]

Use for other countries[edit]

Certain countries generally accept a U.S. tourist visa that is valid for further travel as a substitute visa for national visas.

Country Period Notes
 Albania 90 days [34]
 Antigua and Barbuda 30 days [35]
 Argentina 3 months Certain nationalities can obtain an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) if holding a B2 visa.[36]
 Belize 30 days Multiple-entry visa only[37]
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 30 days [38]
 Canada up to 6 months Citizens of Brazil arriving by air with Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) only
 Chile 90 days Nationals of China only
 Colombia 90 days Certain nationalities only
 Costa Rica 30 days Only for a multiple-entry visa that is valid for at least six months[39]
 Dominican Republic 90 days [40]
 El Salvador 90 days Certain nationalities only
 Georgia 90 days Valid for 90 days within any 180-day period
 Guatemala 90 days Certain nationalities only
 Honduras 90 days Certain nationalities only
 Jamaica 30 days Certain nationalities only
 Mexico 180 days [41][42]
 Montenegro 30 days [43]
 Nicaragua 90 days Certain nationalities only
 North Macedonia 15 days  
 Oman   Certain nationalities may obtain an electronic Omani visa
 Panama 30 or 180 days Must hold a visa valid for at least 2 additional entries
 Peru 180 days Applicable to nationals of China and nationals of India only
 Philippines 7 or 14 days 7 days for nationals of China; 14 days for nationals of India
 Qatar 30 days Nationals who must typically enter with a visa may obtain an electronic travel authorization
 São Tomé and Príncipe 15 days  
 Serbia 90 days [44]
 South Korea 30 days  
 Taiwan   Certain nationalities may obtain an online travel authority
 Turkey   Certain nationalities may obtain an electronic visa
 United Arab Emirates 14 days Visa on arrival for nationals of India only[45]

Statistics[edit]

Visitor visas issued[edit]

Issued B-1/B-2 visas in fiscal 2017
  United States
  Visa exempt nationalities
  Over 400 thousand issued visas
  Over 100 thousand issued visas
  Over 50 thousand issued visas
  Over 25 thousand issued visas
  Over 10 thousand issued visas
  Over 5 thousand issued visas
  Under 5 thousand issued visas

The highest number of B-1/B-2 visas were issued to nationals of the following countries in fiscal years 2015, 2016, and 2017.

Nationality B-1/B-2 visas issued
FY 2017[46] FY 2016[47] FY 2015[48]
 China 1,452,834 1,989,925 2,227,670
 Mexico[a] 1,088,880 1,106,723 1,234,885
 India 599,983 563,202 553,385
 Brazil 520,589 450,166 870,008
 Colombia 333,433 374,398 345,233
 Argentina 353,555 295,326 240,115
 Dominican Republic 194,557 136,057 85,140
 Ecuador 168,103 150,163 150,458
 Russia 164,944 151,692 122,147
 Israel 163,495 168,136 137,439
 Nigeria 155,940 162,996 136,409
 Philippines 115,712 99,967 83,139
 Vietnam 100,423 86,180 80,936
 Poland 95,272 88,624 81,861
 Peru 82,485 79,927 97,936
 Costa Rica 75,529 71,710 58,139
 Turkey 74,312 85,560 78,118
 Jamaica 65,119 94,458 83,483
 Hong Kong 62,131 61,708 54,027
 Honduras 54,753 48,177 35,004
 Egypt 54,216 58,062 46,433
 Saudi Arabia 52,476 78,042 85,303
 Indonesia 52,233 48,787 48,239
 Pakistan 48,537 65,844 62,714
 Venezuela 47,087 144,283 223,854
 South Africa 46,427 45,240 48,432
 Ukraine 45,709 45,638 52,943
 Thailand 43,182 47,382 44,795
 Guatemala 41,055 52,326 48,735
Total 6,276,851 7,988,520 8,403,683

In fiscal year 2014, most reasons to refuse a visa were cited as "failure to establish entitlement to nonimmigrant status", "incompatible application" (most overcome), "unlawful presence", "misrepresentation", "criminal convictions", "smugglers" and "controlled substance violators". Smaller number of applications were rejected for "physical or mental disorder", "prostitution", "espionage", "terrorist activities", "falsely claiming citizenship" and other grounds for refusal including "presidential proclamation", "money laundering", "communicable disease" and "commission of acts of torture or extrajudicial killings".[49]

Number of non-immigrant admissions for tourist and business purposes into the United States in fiscal year 2017
  United States
  Over 2 million admissions
  Over 1 million admissions
  Over 500 thousand admissions
  Over 250 thousand admissions
  Over 100 thousand admissions
  Over 15 thousand admissions
  Under 15 thousand admissions

Adjusted visa refusal rate[edit]

US B visa refusal rate in fiscal year 2019
  United States
  Visa exempt countries
  Over 50%
  Over 40%
  Over 30%
  Over 20%
  Over 10%
  Over 5%
  Over 3%
  Under 3%

The adjusted visa refusal rate for B visas were as follows.

Country/Region Fiscal Year 2008[50] Fiscal Year 2014[51] Fiscal Year 2015[52] Fiscal Year 2016[53] Fiscal Year 2017[54] Fiscal Year 2018[55] Fiscal Year 2019[56]
 Afghanistan 51.00% 46.70% 61.03% 73.80% 72.14% 71.39% 68.42%
 Albania 38.70% 39.80% 36.82% 35.95% 40.45% 41.92% 41.45%
 Algeria 20.30% 23.10% 25.92% 36.00% 43.96% 39.26% 44.22%
 Angola 17.10% 21.40% 26.77% 48.52% 36.01% 51.76% 58.26%
 Antigua and Barbuda 21.70% 20.80% 20.17% 22.11% 20.50% 19.07% 15.25%
 Argentina 3.10% 1.40% 2.14% 2.14% 1.79% 1.73% 2.07%
 Armenia 53.30% 43.80% 47.17% 45.88% 51.87% 53.83% 51.65%
 Azerbaijan 14.00% 13.50% 12.93% 14.83% 27.63% 28.45% 25.43%
 Bahrain 6.60% 4.70% 3.81% 6.26% 9.53% 6.96% 13.55%
 Bangladesh 48.20% 50.80% 59.96% 62.82% 60.88% 40.05% 39.78%
 Barbados 10.10% 9.80% 9.54% 11.24% 8.72% 7.07% 6.76%
 Belarus 21.10% 14.00% 12.53% 14.87% 21.69% 23.26% 21.93%
 Belize 25.40% 16.40% 30.47% 35.21% 30.91% 34.55% 28.63%
 Benin 39.10% 31.40% 35.74% 38.01% 42.10% 47.74% 48.48%
 Bhutan 48.30% 43.60% 54.55% 69.78% 52.43% 59.63% 57.13%
 Bolivia 23.60% 13.60% 13.56% 14.36% 18.08% 22.19% 24.17%
 Bosnia-Herzegovina 21.30% 16.10% 20.38% 19.70% 16.37% 23.50% 25.27%
 Botswana 15.60% 16.90% 16.67% 18.97% 17.94% 18.67% 17.54%
 Brazil 5.50% 3.20% 5.36% 16.70% 12.34% 12.73% 18.48%
 Bulgaria 13.30% 15.20% 17.26% 16.86% 14.97% 11.32% 9.75%
 Burkina Faso 44.40% 37.40% 50.37% 65.35% 75.74% 71.16% 62.32%
 Burundi 58.80% 50.00% 58.35% 61.33% 75.55% 74.39% 73.16%
 Cambodia 44.30% 39.90% 48.41% 35.62% 41.05% 54.22% 33.65%
 Cameroon 46.70% 28.20% 29.89% 36.84% 47.29% 32.63% 57.97%
 Cape Verde 42.70% 28.70% 36.05% 45.89% 50.70% 52.27% 52.66%
 Central African Republic 39.60% 46.60% 32.43% 35.12% 44.24% 36.03% 37.45%
 Chad 41.40% 32.40% 33.87% 42.53% 51.65% 60.80% 70.16%
 China 18.20% 9.00% 10.03% 12.35% 14.57% 17.00% 18.22%
 Colombia 25.60% 12.30% 15.52% 17.79% 21.93% 35.11% 41.93%
 Comoros 14.00% 17.00% 54.44% 53.73% 48.45% 69.46% 53.02%
 Congo 33.20% 35.40% 40.77% 46.55% 48.47% 52.23% 60.49%
 Costa Rica 21.20% 11.40% 9.83% 8.39% 6.49% 9.91% 18.66%
 Croatia 5.10% 6.10% 5.29% 6.78% 5.10% 5.92% 4.02%
 Cuba 45.20% 66.20% 76.03% 81.85% 77.17% 50.97% 53.40%
 Cyprus 1.70% 3.50% 3.53% 2.03% 1.69% 2.38% 2.78%
 Democratic Republic of the Congo 36.20% 39.10% 45.62% 45.63% 49.94% 50.56% 53.80%
 Djibouti 42.50% 50.10% 52.00% 47.09% 74.80% 82.96% 85.35%
 Dominica 29.50% 29.00% 33.33% 31.63% 28.74% 37.13% 26.83%
 Dominican Republic 45.60% 35.90% 33.78% 31.88% 35.78% 49.54% 53.21%
 East Timor 16.70% 25.00% 12.68% 26.67% 7.02% 8.16% 4.23%
 Ecuador 40.00% 20.80% 31.34% 29.18% 27.95% 31.38% 34.05%
 Egypt 35.30% 34.00% 33.57% 28.61% 34.24% 32.15% 31.83%
 El Salvador 45.70% 36.30% 45.72% 57.12% 52.97% 51.49% 58.18%
 Equatorial Guinea 11.10% 17.80% 19.30% 17.75% 18.21% 21.29% 27.79%
 Eritrea 51.10% 41.70% 55.67% 50.49% 71.69% 69.54% 65.39%
 Eswatini 13.00% 10.00% 12.95% 8.03% 12.59% 8.49% 5.73%
 Ethiopia 46.70% 44.90% 48.32% 38.13% 50.30% 41.74% 45.46%
 Fiji 38.00% 14.00% 14.92% 20.23% 26.59% 41.74% 38.96%
 Gabon 23.00% 13.50% 15.74% 21.29% 26.10% 40.00% 45.41%
 Gambia 55.70% 69.30% 75.64% 69.87% 70.27% 64.22% 72.30%
 Georgia 46.60% 48.20% 50.58% 62.82% 61.09% 62.35% 63.85%
 Ghana 50.10% 59.80% 63.28% 65.70% 56.18% 49.35% 55.60%
 Grenada 29.90% 29.50% 32.00% 35.71% 26.94% 26.44% 19.49%
 Guatemala 33.80% 35.90% 45.37% 48.68% 47.14% 53.62% 58.64%
 Guinea 63.80% 47.80% 59.81% 63.53% 64.59% 66.16% 73.29%
 Guinea-Bissau 63.40% 56.50% 65.18% 71.88% 71.61% 76.09% 65.33%
 Guyana 56.60% 40.20% 37.28% 25.76% 37.92% 70.62% 62.96%
 Haiti 54.40% 58.20% 60.45% 64.52% 71.44% 67.59% 60.81%
 Honduras 33.60% 36.80% 39.73% 42.76% 40.35% 60.32% 61.71%
 Hong Kong 3.30% 3.10% 4.36% 4.61% 3.45% 4.25% 3.23%
 India 24.70% 19.80% 23.78% 26.02% 23.29% 26.07% 27.75%
 Indonesia 37.00% 8.30% 8.71% 11.19% 10.99% 12.81% 12.46%
 Iran 42.50% 41.80% 38.55% 45.02% 58.66% 87.66% 86.58%
 Iraq 46.30% 41.40% 52.82% 51.71% 60.71% 56.95% 49.94%
 Israel 3.00% 8.20% 3.85% 4.09% 4.88% 5.10% 5.33%
 Ivory Coast 40.90% 29.80% 28.59% 37.38% 33.72% 33.81% 35.73%
 Jamaica 35.50% 32.30% 37.62% 35.64% 46.78% 54.46% 56.59%
 Jordan 43.20% 26.90% 37.59% 40.34% 40.06% 42.62% 45.26%
 Kazakhstan 11.70% 9.90% 12.70% 27.55% 32.81% 39.38% 42.58%
 Kenya 35.60% 27.30% 27.34% 26.60% 33.17% 41.59% 49.86%
 Kiribati 26.20% 15.40% 16.05% 5.81% 5.13% 25.33% 11.69%
 Kosovo 47.90% 38.10% 44.03% 41.48% 37.92% 35.97% 36.76%
 Kuwait 6.50% 5.70% 5.73% 4.56% 8.32% 2.71% 3.27%
 Kyrgyzstan 32.10% 43.20% 55.75% 51.68% 55.58% 58.9% 67.75%
 Laos 73.40% 61.10% 66.68% 62.37% 63.66% 64.06% 65.60%
 Lebanon 27.90% 16.10% 27.10% 25.41% 31.75% 25.22% 23.85%
 Lesotho 32.10% 16.70% 13.95% 21.20% 35.97% 21.94% 28.24%
 Liberia 70.70% 49.40% 62.45% 70.23% 64.98% 64.36% 73.93%
 Libya 27.10% 33.90% 43.02% 40.58% 45.50% 73.73% 89.05%
 Madagascar 11.90% 11.60% 11.01% 12.12% 11.00% 11.77% 7.69%
 Malawi 28.90% 12.30% 10.23% 14.52% 26.49% 28.20% 37.05%
 Malaysia 5.60% 4.60% 3.34% 3.65% 3.93% 4.94% 4.91%
 Maldives 4.70% 6.70% 15.49% 47.56% 27.74% 9.88% 33.65%
 Mali 48.10% 54.00% 52.77% 57.58% 59.43% 50.60% 55.89%
 Mauritania 51.00% 52.20% 61.45% 71.45% 67.30% 61.58% 67.79%
 Mauritius 11.60% 2.20% 5.71% 5.53% 8.29% 6.49% 6.59%
 Mexico 11.40% 15.60% 20.17% 23.49% 22.50% 24.93% 26.66%
 Moldova 36.70% 40.10% 41.83% 36.35% 49.12% 61.10% 58.03%
 Mongolia 53.60% 27.90% 34.76% 43.63% 53.62% 56.51% 54.60%
 Montenegro 25.60% 28.00% 31.26% 28.69% 26.41% 35.35% 39.10%
 Morocco 24.00% 21.90% 20.60% 26.77% 36.99% 42.88% 28.48%
 Mozambique 13.80% 4.00% 4.03% 10.29% 26.18% 10.22% 14.24%
 Myanmar 41.90% 15.50% 16.32% 13.02% 17.88% 23.12% 30.91%
 Namibia 6.80% 7.60% 7.43% 5.56% 6.31% 8.40% 6.60%
 Nauru 66.70% 42.90% 5.26% 13.33% 20.97% 21.43% 20.83%
   Nepal 51.20% 38.20% 42.19% 49.54% 46.42% 51.53% 50.70%
 Nicaragua 41.80% 35.80% 41.19% 44.54% 43.28% 46.75% 63.52%
 Niger 55.70% 36.40% 31.10% 31.14% 30.65% 43.33% 42.76%
 Nigeria 36.00% 33.20% 32.56% 41.44% 44.95% 57.47% 67.20%
Non-nationality based issuances[a] n/a n/a n/a 28.92% 35.61% 40.27% 43.16%
 North Korea 16.30% 55.60% 47.67% 15.00% 54.55% 100.00% 100%
 North Macedonia 33.50% 29.80% 36.08% 33.84% 28.69% 31.29% 36.19%
 Oman 2.20% 2.10% 2.00% 1.93% 3.46% 4.87% 5.13%
 Pakistan 46.30% 38.00% 40.40% 46.43% 49.40% 47.89% 48.26%
 Palestine 55.60% 36.70% 42.68% 40.64% 50.98% 53.87% 52.92%
 Panama 19.20% 10.00% 11.36% 12.05% 11.61% 11.71% 18.93%
 Papua New Guinea 3.40% 7.40% 5.14% 10.56% 9.34% 6.84% 1.74%
 Paraguay 14.40% 6.10% 6.15% 7.47% 6.83% 8.02% 12.41%
 Peru 37.70% 13.80% 14.46% 28.61% 25.97% 28.53% 25.39%
 Philippines 31.00% 24.60% 27.96% 27.29% 25.54% 27.07% 24.40%
 Poland 13.80% 6.40% 6.37% 5.37% 5.92% 3.99% 2.76%
 Qatar 4.90% 2.10% 2.97% 3.50% 7.48% 8.34% 10.33%
 Romania 25.00% 9.80% 11.16% 11.43% 11.76% 10.44% 9.11%
 Russia 7.50% 7.80% 10.24% 9.29% 11.61% 14.89% 15.19%
 Rwanda 50.30% 51.10% 49.17% 43.79% 52.17% 44.51% 53.76%
 Saint Kitts and Nevis 25.00% 27.50% 26.60% 28.31% 26.66% 24.98% 21.87%
 Saint Lucia 26.60% 27.60% 26.90% 27.16% 22.34% 21.90% 16.75%
 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 26.40% 24.10% 27.15% 27.46% 20.38% 19.17% 14.55%
 Samoa 32.40% 27.20% 29.99% 28.44% 40.32% 26.26% 27.02%
 São Tomé and Príncipe 28.60% 10.70% 5.71% 24.14% 14.81% 26.09% 34.78%
 Saudi Arabia 6.60% 3.30% 3.24% 4.04% 5.26% 7.47% 6.82%
 Senegal 55.20% 57.50% 54.37% 52.46% 56.85% 59.18% 55.88%
 Serbia 11.70% 16.00% 16.54% 18.77% 22.33% 25.93% 30.33%
 Seychelles 18.00% 6.80% 7.26% 9.66% 13.14% 11.64% 10.60%
 Sierra Leone 50.10% 51.90% 53.02% 61.25% 47.30% 60.56% 57.99%
 Solomon Islands 6.50% 5.40% 7.26% 4.28% 16.79% 3.57% 2.20%
 Somalia 54.00% 52.00% 64.60% 63.89% 75.50% 90.16% 80.77%
 South Africa 4.60% 2.60% 5.08% 6.83% 6.44% 7.31% 6.92%
 South Sudan n/a 43.80% 41.77% 43.89% 47.52% 41.29% 52.32%
 Sri Lanka 31.40% 19.50% 22.07% 21.69% 26.19% 33.61% 35.12%
 Sudan 38.60% 42.40% 40.45% 36.59% 51.37% 59.83% 57.44%
 Suriname 9.60% 13.60% 7.78% 10.86% 11.44% 8.57% 7.44%
 Syria 33.10% 60.00% 63.43% 59.77% 59.11% 77.31% 74.83%
 Tajikistan 32.40% 49.00% 44.44% 55.24% 51.84% 53.39% 60.97%
 Tanzania 26.20% 21.30% 12.02% 23.05% 18.36% 19.87% 23.90%
 Thailand 19.80% 10.20% 12.35% 17.82% 20.15% 22.17% 23.41%
 Togo 51.70% 35.60% 43.42% 54.39% 59.88% 59.61% 59.78%
 Tonga 48.70% 25.40% 28.09% 31.58% 32.85% 51.33% 45.85%
 Trinidad and Tobago 23.80% 21.20% 25.16% 22.70% 22.46% 19.28% 13.05%
 Tunisia 23.90% 17.50% 19.69% 15.92% 19.53% 27.67% 24.17%
 Turkey 11.20% 7.10% 13.88% 13.62% 17.86% 17.49% 19.19%
 Turkmenistan 45.40% 18.60% 25.41% 32.95% 40.60% 52.93% 56.26%
 Tuvalu 17.60% 27.30% 21.05% 20.00% 15.38% 34.78% 25.81%
 Uganda 34.40% 37.20% 30.63% 41.53% 42.38% 42.29% 51.65%
 Ukraine 30.90% 27.70% 34.03% 40.83% 34.54% 40.97% 45.06%
 United Arab Emirates 10.40% 4.80% 7.10% 4.02% 5.80% 3.75% 5.56%
 Uruguay 9.50% 1.80% 2.70% 3.14% 3.19% 4.11% 5.91%
 Uzbekistan 61.10% 52.10% 49.59% 57.09% 50.29% 61.76% 68.06%
 Vanuatu 16.70% 20.00% 10.53% 16.67% 13.51% 38.30% 41.05%
  Vatican City 16.70% 7.70% 25.00% 0.00% 36.36% 0.00% 8.33%
 Venezuela 25.40% 15.20% 15.57% 40.25% 42.87% 74.28% 59.53%
 Vietnam 38.80% 14.30% 23.43% 29.49% 24.06% 26.20% 23.70%
 Western Sahara n/a n/a n/a n/a 100.00% 0.00% 0.00%
 Yemen 54.70% 44.20% 54.01% 48.85% 60.76% 82.50% 78.45%
 Zambia 53.30% 22.20% 20.98% 22.26% 21.72% 22.45% 40.64%
 Zimbabwe 30.30% 13.20% 21.03% 22.88% 26.32% 26.60% 26.92%
  1. ^ "Non-nationality based issuances" includes individuals presenting travel documents issued by a competent authority other than their country of nationality, including, for example, aliens traveling on a Laissez-Passer issued by the United Nations and refugees residing in another country.

Visitor admissions[edit]

The individuals admitted for tourism and/or business purposes during fiscal year 2017 were nationals from the following countries.[57][58][59][60]

Admissions
Nationality Number of Travelers[a]
 Afghanistan 1,910
 Albania 14,151
 Algeria 13,291
 Andorra 1,417
 Angola 6,900
 Antigua and Barbuda 14,992
 Argentina 1,085,461
 Armenia 11,614
 Australia[b] 1,463,908
 Austria 219,187
 Azerbaijan 6,912
 Bahamas 293,192
 Bahrain 7,168
 Bangladesh 29,646
 Barbados 66,984
 Belarus 18,926
 Belgium 302,585
 Belize 28,496
 Benin 2,301
 Bhutan 612
 Bolivia 71,519
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 8,246
 Botswana 2,108
 Brazil 2,011,385
 Brunei 1,126
 Bulgaria 31,126
 Burkina Faso 4,716
 Burundi 1,597
 Cambodia 3,890
 Cameroon 12,014
 Canada 11,616,347
 Cape Verde 4,833
 Central African Republic 216
 Chad 745
 Chile 396,367
 China[c] 2,630,300
 Colombia 926,855
 Comoros 102
 Congo 1,146
 Costa Rica 307,979
 Croatia 26,345
 Cuba 67,284
 Cyprus 10,642
 Czech Republic 123,545
 Democratic Republic of the Congo 6,701
 Denmark[d] 353,381
 Djibouti 1,252
 Dominica 5,692
 Dominican Republic 435,775
 East Timor 54
 Ecuador 430,136
 Egypt 80,367
 El Salvador 199,375
 Equatorial Guinea 982
 Eritrea 3,373
 Estonia 25,799
 Eswatini 325
 Ethiopia 20,951
 Fiji 10,810
 Finland 160,289
 France[e] 1,923,414
 Gabon 2,013
 Gambia 1,661
 Georgia 3,710
 Germany 2,228,358
 Ghana 22,949
 Greece 86,475
 Grenada 11,498
 Guatemala 285,254
 Guinea 3,241
 Guinea-Bissau 164
 Guyana 71,314
 Haiti 148,524
 Honduras 215,261
 Hungary 97,439
 Iceland 66,319
 India 1,264,598
 Indonesia 100,932
 Iran 14,530
 Iraq 16,790
 Ireland 532,793
 Israel 435,873
 Italy 1,282,989
 Ivory Coast 6,703
 Jamaica 314,301
 Japan 3,697,844
 Jordan 40,558
 Kazakhstan 23,011
 Kenya 27,588
 Kiribati 237
 Kosovo 3,752
 Kuwait 39,519
 Kyrgyzstan 1,443
 Laos 1,654
 Latvia 23,539
 Lebanon 41,731
 Lesotho 333
 Liberia 3,555
 Libya 780
 Liechtenstein 2,008
 Lithuania 26,135
 Luxembourg 13,333
 Madagascar 1,227
 Malawi 2,232
 Malaysia 82,881
 Maldives 382
 Mali 3,491
 Malta 6,789
 Marshall Islands 70
 Mauritania 920
 Mauritius 4,765
 Mexico 18,101,904[f]
 Micronesia 70
 Moldova 8,991
 Monaco 991
 Mongolia 11,377
 Morocco[g] 30,043
 Mozambique 1,773
 Myanmar 7,976
 Namibia 2,043
 Nauru 49
   Nepal 28,394
 Netherlands[h] 796,945
 New Zealand[i] 351,924
 Nicaragua 69,900
 Niger 1,347
 Nigeria 196,326
 North Korea 16
 North Macedonia 8,059
 Norway 298,554
 Oman 4,347
 Pakistan 104,064
 Palau 30
 Panama 149,544
 Papua New Guinea 682
 Paraguay 29,059
 Peru 310,924
 Philippines 352,474
 Poland 212,207
 Portugal 190,022
 Qatar 11,833
 Romania 83,926
 Russia 297,397
 Rwanda 3,395
 Saint Kitts and Nevis 12,288
 Saint Lucia 16,338
 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 10,313
 Samoa 2,072
 San Marino 699
 São Tomé and Príncipe 34
 Saudi Arabia 108,115
 Senegal 8,785
 Serbia and Montenegro 26,042
 Seychelles 316
 Sierra Leone 2,971
 Singapore 135,949
 Slovakia 53,437
 Slovenia 26,727
 Solomon Islands 196
 Somalia 161
 South Africa 129,412
 South Korea 2,324,707
 South Sudan 234
 Spain 1,037,798
 Sri Lanka 24,507
 Sudan 3,460
 Suriname 12,770
 Sweden 568,668
  Switzerland 433,375
 Syria 8,869
 Taiwan 456,106
 Tajikistan 1,542
 Tanzania 5,868
 Thailand 93,760
 Togo 2,402
 Tonga 3,834
 Trinidad and Tobago 186,223
 Tunisia 10,907
 Turkey 174,501
 Turkmenistan 1,117
 Tuvalu 39
 Uganda 8,957
 Ukraine 98,547
 United Arab Emirates 28,435
 United Kingdom[j] 4,786,421
 Uruguay 80,410
 Uzbekistan 11,565
 Vanuatu 110
  Vatican City 0[k]
 Venezuela 540,168
 Vietnam 101,686
 Yemen 2,713
 Zambia 4,245
 Zimbabwe 7,939
Unknown 61,705
Total 70,056,257

Overstays[edit]

A number of visitors overstay the maximum period of allowed stay on their B-1/B-2 status after entering the U.S. The Department of Homeland Security publishes annual reports that list the number of violations by passengers who arrive by air and sea. The table below excludes statistics on persons who left the United States later than their allowed stay or legalized their status and shows only suspected overstays who remained in the country. More than 95% of visitors from Mexico arrive in the U.S. by land rather than by air and sea. Statistics for suspected overstays of the land visitors are yet to be released.[61]

The number of suspected in-country B-1/B-2 overstays in fiscal year 2018 by nationalitywere the following.[62][63][64]

Country of Citizenship Expected Departures Out-of-country Overstays Suspected In-country Overstays Total Overstays Total Overstay Rate Suspected In-country Overstay Rate
Afghanistan 1,339 4 169 173 12.92% 12.62%
Albania 15,319 56 562 618 4.03% 3.67%
Algeria 11,126 43 278 321 2.89% 2.50%
Andorra 1,611 0 3 3 0.19% 0.19%
Angola 6,342 22 963 985 15.53% 15.18%
Antigua and Barbuda 14,508 26 202 228 1.57% 1.39%
Argentina 1,116,017 276 7,909 8,185 0.73% 0.71%
Armenia 11,315 39 482 521 4.60% 4.26%
Australia[a] 1,418,265 829 3,155 3,984 0.28% 0.22%
Austria 210,050 74 647 721 0.34% 0.31%
Azerbaijan 6,731 27 486 513 7.62% 7.22%
Bahamas 272,487 253 1,292 1,545 0.57% 0.47%
Bahrain 6,784 9 43 52 0.77% 0.63%
Bangladesh 26,795 52 565 617 2.30% 2.11%
Barbados 64,795 39 718 757 1.17% 1.11%
Belarus 18,198 57 673 730 4.01% 3.70%
Belgium 300,319 148 785 933 0.31% 0.26%
Belize 28,642 49 554 603 2.11% 1.93%
Benin 2,079 17 97 114 5.48% 4.67%
Bhutan 398 6 46 52 13.07% 11.56%
Bolivia 69,041 73 1,108 1,181 1.71% 1.60%
Bosnia and Herzegovina 8,186 36 109 145 1.77% 1.33%
Botswana 2,095 5 26 31 1.48% 1.24%
Brazil 2,200,440 1,720 34,569 36,289 1.65% 1.57%
Brunei 1,160 0 9 9 0.78% 0.78%
Bulgaria 30,799 69 235 304 0.99% 0.76%
Burkina Faso 3,953 24 308 332 8.40% 7.79%
Burundi 1,157 0 249 249 21.52% 21.52%
Cambodia 4,045 9 110 119 2.94% 2.72%
Cameroon 10,958 125 826 951 8.68% 7.54%
Central African Republic 212 2 14 16 7.55% 6.60%
Cape Verde 4,870 30 553 583 11.97% 11.36%
Chad 536 3 162 165 30.78% 30.22%
Chile 403,917 655 5,364 6,019 1.49% 1.33%
China[b] 2,345,850 2,575 15,739 18,314 0.78% 0.67%
Colombia 929,005 935 20,982 21,917 2.36% 2.26%
Comoros 87 0 2 2 2.30% 2.30%
Congo 1,096 5 119 124 11.31% 10.86%
Costa Rica 306,925 184 2,830 3,014 0.98% 0.92%
Croatia 26,385 24 108 132 0.50% 0.41%
Cuba 70,484 254 1,614 1,868 2.65% 2.29%
Cyprus 10,413 4 38 42 0.40% 0.36%
Czech Republic 125,142 174 612 786 0.63% 0.49%
Democratic Republic of the Congo 6,446 24 497 521 8.08% 7.71%
Denmark[c] 340,333 114 656 770 0.23% 0.19%
Djibouti 403 3 177 180 44.67% 43.92%
Dominica 7,336 28 275 303 4.13% 3.75%
Dominican Republic 446,451 443 14,198 14,641 3.28% 3.18%
East Timor 61 0 0 0 0.00% 0.00%
Ecuador 429,106 345 6,652 6,997 1.63% 1.55%
Egypt 74,162 183 1,848 2,031 2.74% 2.49%
El Salvador 199,915 210 3,229 3,439 1.72% 1.62%
Equatorial Guinea 1,002 9 54 63 6.29% 5.39%
Eritrea 2,041 49 491 540 26.46% 24.06%
Estonia 24,922 25 91 116 0.47% 0.37%
Eswatini 875 1 11 12 1.37% 1.26%
Ethiopia 19,150 136 843 979 5.11% 4.40%
Fiji 8,257 39 206 245 2.97% 2.49%
Finland 151,678 59 293 352 0.23% 0.19%
France[d] 1,907,233 1,103 10,427 11,530 0.60% 0.55%
Gabon 1,843 12 88 100 5.43% 4.77%
Gambia 1,747 19 129 148 8.47% 7.38%
Georgia 7,919 30 819 849 10.72% 10.34%
Germany 2,128,450 962 5,766 6,728 0.32% 0.27%
Ghana 23,486 71 804 875 3.73% 3.42%
Greece 90,919 322 825 1,147 1.26% 0.91%
Grenada 11,032 20 219 239 2.17% 1.99%
Guatemala 276,400 291 5,548 5,839 2.11% 2.01%
Guinea 2,651 19 120 139 5.24% 4.53%
Guinea-Bissau 143 0 14 14 9.79% 9.79%
Guyana 66,416 155 3,065 3,220 4.85% 4.61%
Haiti 137,119 453 6,464 6,917 5.04% 4.71%
Honduras 214,468 253 3,890 4,143 1.93% 1.81%
Hungary 98,877 268 978 1,246 1.26% 0.99%
Iceland 69,723 26 123 149 0.21% 0.18%
India 1,134,436 2,216 10,770 12,986 1.14% 0.95%
Indonesia 93,250 92 827 919 0.99% 0.89%
Iran 9,149 79 234 313 3.42% 2.56%
Iraq 7,486 37 382 419 5.60% 5.10%
Ireland 558,218 218 1,487 1,705 0.31% 0.27%
Israel 418,944 375 3,251 3,626 0.87% 0.78%
Italy 1,304,020 1,063 6,009 7,072 0.54% 0.46%
Ivory Coast 6,199 29 260 289 4.66% 4.19%
Jamaica 312,667 384 10,242 10,626 3.40% 3.28%
Japan 3,122,345 372 4,505 4,877 0.16% 0.14%
Jordan 38,906 172 1,554 1,726 4.44% 3.99%
Kazakhstan 22,274 53 676 729 3.27% 3.03%
Kenya 27,559 99 1,494 1,593 5.78% 5.42%
Kiribati 115 0 1 1 0.87% 0.87%
Kosovo 244 3 7 10 4.10% 2.87%
Kuwait 38,071 410 517 927 2.43% 1.36%
Kyrgyzstan 3,316 7 99 106 3.20% 2.99%
Laos 1,508 7 144 151 10.01% 9.55%
Latvia 22,919 73 162 235 1.03% 0.71%
Lebanon 37,840 76 604 680 1.80% 1.60%
Lesotho 364 0 2 2 0.55% 0.55%
Liberia 3,372 68 392 460 13.64% 11.63%
Libya 430 4 15 19 4.42% 3.49%
Liechtenstein 1,890 2 2 4 0.21% 0.11%
Lithuania 38,341 122 384 506 1.32% 1.00%
Luxembourg 13,625 9 39 48 0.35% 0.29%
Madagascar 1,103 2 12 14 1.27% 1.09%
Malawi 2,010 7 121 128 6.37% 6.02%
Malaysia 78,865 55 866 921 1.17% 1.10%
Maldives 225 0 2 2 0.89% 0.89%
Mali 3,234 10 146 156 4.82% 4.51%
Malta 7,160 3 22 25 0.35% 0.31%
Marshall Islands 78 0 4 4 5.13% 5.13%
Mauritania 698 7 71 78 11.17% 10.17%
Mauritius 3,366 4 18 22 0.65% 0.53%
Micronesia 60 0 6 6 10.00% 10.00%
Moldova 9,887 32 257 289 2.92% 2.60%
Monaco 1,008 1 3 4 0.40% 0.30%
Mongolia 11,401 41 378 419 3.68% 3.32%
Montenegro 5,571 30 356 386 6.93% 6.39%
Morocco[e] 26,526 75 388 463 1.75% 1.46%
Mozambique 1,820 5 30 35 1.92% 1.65%
Myanmar 7,492 31 419 450 6.01% 5.59%
Namibia 2,080 7 42 49 2.36% 2.02%
Nauru 45 1 1 2 4.44% 2.22%
Nepal 27,205 215 970 1,185 4.36% 3.57%
Netherlands[f] 795,308 359 2,821 3,180 0.40% 0.35%
New Zealand[g] 345,636 252 843 1,095 0.32% 0.24%
Nicaragua 69,133 72 1,250 1,322 1.91% 1.81%
Niger 1,138 9 75 84 7.38% 6.59%
Nigeria 195,785 719 29,004 29,723 15.18% 14.81%
North Korea 37 12 0 0 0.00% 0.00%
North Macedonia 7,891 19 121 140 1.77% 1.53%
Norway 285,524 128 520 648 0.23% 0.18%
Oman 4,342 11 26 37 0.85% 0.60%
Pakistan 88,177 163 1,917 2,080 2.36% 2.17%
Palau 34 1 6 7 20.59% 17.65%
Panama 148,294 97 831 928 0.63% 0.56%
Papua New Guinea 589 1 3 4 0.68% 0.51%
Paraguay 30,301 23 501 524 1.73% 1.65%
Peru 302,829 340 4,653 4,993 1.65% 1.54%
Philippines 304,585 620 4,993 5,613 1.84% 1.64%
Poland 211,438 215 1,635 1,850 0.87% 0.77%
Portugal 198,982 444 3,140 3,584 1.80% 1.58%
Qatar 11,645 128 154 282 2.42% 1.32%
Romania 82,670 171 720 891 1.08% 0.87%
Russia 265,798 347 4,234 4,581 1.72% 1.59%
Rwanda 3,312 16 137 153 4.62% 4.14%
Saint Kitts and Nevis 11,764 11 203 214 1.82% 1.73%
Saint Lucia 15,780 25 293 318 2.02% 1.86%
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 9,443 15 263 278 2.94% 2.79%
Samoa 2,111 14 140 154 7.30% 6.63%
San Marino 731 0 3 3 0.41% 0.41%
São Tomé and Príncipe 30 0 1 1 3.33% 3.33%
Saudi Arabia 100,922 399 817 1,216 1.20% 0.81%
Senegal 7,848 36 280 316 4.03% 3.57%
Serbia 29,173 67 304 371 1.27% 1.04%
Seychelles 337 0 2 2 0.59% 0.59%
Sierra Leone 2,893 20 191 211 7.29% 6.60%
Singapore 134,505 97 205 302 0.22% 0.15%
Slovakia 54,438 102 406 508 0.93% 0.75%
Slovenia 27,559 21 86 107 0.39% 0.31%
Solomon Islands 169 0 3 3 1.78% 1.78%
Somalia 78 1 9 10 12.82% 11.54%
South Africa 126,668 129 848 977 0.77% 0.67%
South Korea 1,579,221 1,027 3,524 4,551 0.29% 0.22%
South Sudan 239 0 36 36 15.06% 15.06%
Spain 1,050,622 1,564 10,208 11,772 1.12% 0.97%
Sri Lanka 20,997 18 286 304 1.45% 1.36%
Sudan 2,937 29 339 368 12.53% 11.54%
Suriname 12,711 17 175 192 1.51% 1.38%
Sweden 541,849 244 1,168 1,412 0.26% 0.22%
Switzerland 409,632 190 1,032 1,222 0.30 0.25%
Syria 6,851 27 1,180 1,207 17.62% 17.22%
Taiwan 428,767 541 1,214 1,755 0.41% 0.28%
Tajikistan 1,377 19 81 100 7.26% 5.88%
Tanzania 5,892 33 171 204 3.46% 2.90%
Thailand 90,436 148 1,491 1,639 1.81% 1.65%
Togo 2,173 15 170 185 8.51% 7.82%
Tonga 3,422 17 143 160 4.68% 4.18%
Trinidad and Tobago 180,415 83 728 811 0.45% 0.40%
Tunisia 9,175 26 188 214 2.33% 2.05%
Turkey 165,724 280 2,804 3,084 1.86% 1.69%
Turkmenistan 1,044 3 92 95 9.10% 8.81%
Tuvalu 38 0 1 1 2.63% 2.63%
Uganda 9,247 30 768 798 8.63% 8.31%
Ukraine 92,766 178 2,047 2,225 2.40% 2.21%
United Arab Emirates 28,772 325 383 708 2.46% 1.33%
United Kingdom[h] 4,745,902 1,982 12,233 14,215 0.30% 0.26%
Uruguay 83,279 40 1,397 1,437 1.73% 1.68%
Uzbekistan 10,972 66 667 733 6.68% 6.08%
Vanuatu 98 0 0 0 0.00% 0.00%
Vatican City 31 0 0 0 0.00% 0.00%
Venezuela 477,224 1,029 34,902 35,931 7.53% 7.31%
Vietnam 97,433 366 1,750 2,116 2.17% 1.80%
Yemen 1,816 11 507 518 28.52% 27.92%
Zambia 4,013 15 219 234 5.83% 5.46%
Zimbabwe 7,560 23 192 215 2.84% 2.54%
Total worldwide 38,198,294 34,530 364,020 398,550 1.04% 0.95%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Visitor Visa". United States Department of State.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s "B-1 Permissible Activities". United States Customs and Border Protection. July 30, 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "9 FAM 402.2: (U) Tourists and Business Visitors and Mexican Border Crossing Cards - B Visas and BCCS". Foreign Affairs Manual. United States Department of State. December 28, 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Business Travel to the United States". Bureau of Consular Affairs. United States Department of State. March 2014.
  5. ^ "Business Visa Center FAQs". Bureau of Consular Affairs. United States Department of State. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
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  7. ^ "B-1 Temporary Business Visitor". U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. July 14, 2015.
  8. ^ "B-1 Domestic Workers". Sharma Law Offices, LLC. Retrieved February 16, 2019.
  9. ^ "Domestic Employees Archived 2019-02-17 at the Wayback Machine". U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Mexico. Retrieved February 16, 2019.
  10. ^ "Domestic Employees". U.S. Embassy in Argentina. Retrieved February 16, 2019.
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  16. ^ 22 CFR 22.1, HeinOnline, 1 April 1994.
  17. ^ a b Federal Register document number 94-11681, United States Government Publishing Office, 16 May 1994.
  18. ^ 63 FR 5098, United States Government Publishing Office, 30 January 1998.
  19. ^ 67 FR 34831, Federal Register, 16 May 2002.
  20. ^ 67 FR 62884, Federal Register, 9 October 2002.
  21. ^ 72 FR 72243, Federal Register, 20 December 2007.
  22. ^ 75 FR 28188, Federal Register, 20 May 2010.
  23. ^ 77 FR 18907, Federal Register, 29 March 2012.
  24. ^ "B-1 Temporary Business Visitor". USCIS. Retrieved 2011-10-24.
  25. ^ "B Visa Overview | Immigration.Com - Law Offices of Rajiv S. Khanna, PC". Immigration.Com. Retrieved 2011-02-14.
  26. ^ "Extend Your Stay". USCIS. Retrieved 2011-10-24.
  27. ^ Tourism and visitors Archived 2016-08-04 at the Wayback Machine, U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Mexico.
  28. ^ Temporary reciprocity schedule, United States Department of State.
  29. ^ "Enroll in the Electronic Visa Update (EVUS)". EVUS.us. Archived from the original on 2019-06-05. Retrieved 2019-06-05.
  30. ^ "Is there a fee to apply with EVUS?".
  31. ^ "CBP Announces the Electronic Visa Update System". USCBP. Archived from the original on 2016-08-07. Retrieved 2016-05-24.
  32. ^ "Electronic Visa Update System (EVUS) Frequently Asked Questions". USCBP. Retrieved 2016-05-24.
  33. ^ CBP Launches the Electronic Visa Update System for Early Enrollments
  34. ^ "Visa Regime for Foreign Citizens". Ministria per Evropën dhe Punët e Jashtme. January 11, 2018. "Foreigners that have a valid visa from the United States of America (USA) or United Kingdom (UK), with multiple entries, that has been used previously to enter that country, and/or those that have a valid Residence Permit in USA or UK."
  35. ^ "Visa on Arrival". Antigua and Barbuda Department of Immigration, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, International Trade and Immigration. Retrieved February 8, 2019. "Visas may be granted on arrival: To persons who are holders of a valid: United States Visa or permanent Resident Card; or A Canadian Visa or permanent Resident Card, or A United Kingdom Visa or Resident Card, or A Schengen Visa."
  36. ^ http://www.migraciones.gov.ar/ave/index.htm
  37. ^ "Do I Need a Visa?" Belize High Commission London. Retrieved January 8, 2019. "Nationals of the following countries do NOT require a visa to enter Belize as a tourist for a period of up to 30 days. – Any person who is the holder of a valid United States of America (USA) multiple entry visa or a Permanent Residency Card OR a valid Schengen multiple entry visa for a European Union (EU) member state."
  38. ^ "Visas for Bosnia and Herzegovina Archived 2017-05-28 at the Wayback Machine". Embassy of Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Kingdom of Norway. "Citizens of countries with which BiH has a visa regime can stay up to 30 days in Bosnia and Herzegovina without visa under condition that they possess a valid multiple-entry visa or residence permit issued by the Schengen Agreement country, European Union Member States or United States of America. Such visas or resident permits should be valid for at least 30 days longer than the date of entry into our country."
  39. ^ "Consular Visa". Embassy of Costa Rica in Washington, D.C.. Retrieved February 8, 2018. "Situations that do not need tourist visa to enter Costa Rica. Nationals of countries that require a VISA to enter Costa Rica are NO LONGER REQUIRED TO APPLY FOR THE VISA if: ... Nationals of countries that require a VISA to enter Costa Rica are NO LONGER REQUIRED TO APPLY FOR THE VISA if: You have a tourist visa, crew visa or business visa of multiple entries to enter the UNITED STATES (exclusivity B1/B2, D and C1/ D of multiple entry) ... This visa must be stamped in the passport and must be valid for a minimum of 1 day from the day you enter Costa Rica. The length of stay may not be greater than the validity of the visa and may not exceed 30 days. ... Your passport must be valid for at least six months from the date of entry into the country and once in Costa Rica, you can remain for a maximum of 30 calendar days, An extension of the stay must be requested at the Office of Migration in Costa Rica."
  40. ^ "Visas". Embassy of the Dominican Republic in the United States of America. Retrieved 18 February 2019. "Any person who can legally travel or reside in the United States, Canada and the European Union (including the United Kingdom) does not need a visa to visit the Dominican Republic for tourist purposes."
  41. ^ "Countries and regions that require a visa to travel to Mexico Archived 2015-10-18 at the Wayback Machine". Instituto Nacional de Migración. 27 September 2013.
  42. ^ "|- Visa information for Mexico". Timatic.
  43. ^ "Montenegro Visa Regimes". Visit Montenegro. Holders of travel documents containing a valid Schengen visa, a valid visa of the United States of America, United Kingdom and Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, or a permission to stay in these countries, may enter and stay, or pass through the territory of Montenegro up to 30 days, and not longer than the expiry of visa, if the period of validity of the visa is less than 30 days."
  44. ^ "Travel to Serbia". Embassy of the Republic of Serbia in Washington, D.C. Retrieved February 8, 2019. "Foreign nationals who have a valid US visa or lawful residence in the United States (green card) may enter the Republic of Serbia without visas and stay no longer than 90 days within six month period. Visa must be valid for the whole duration of stay in the Republic of Serbia."
  45. ^ Achkhanian, Mary (29 March 2017). "UAE visa on arrival for Indians with US visa, Green Card". Gulf News.
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  47. ^ FY16 Annual Report: Table XVII (Part I) Nonimmigrant Visas Issued Fiscal Year 2016". United States Department of State.
  48. ^ FY15 Annual Report: Table XVII (Part I) Nonimmigrant Visas Issued Fiscal Year 2015". United States Department of State.
  49. ^ "FY14 Annual Report: Table XX Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Visa Ineligibilities (by Grounds for Refusal Under the Immigration and Nationality Act) Fiscal Year 2014". United States Department of State.
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  53. ^ "Adjusted Refusal Rate, B Visas Only, By Nationality, Fiscal Year 2016". United States Department of State.
  54. ^ "Adjusted Refusal Rate, B Visas Only, By Nationality, Fiscal Year 2017". United States Department of State.
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  56. ^ "Adjusted Refusal Rate, B Visas Only, By Nationality, Fiscal Year 2019". United States Department of State.
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  58. ^ "2015 Yearbook of Immigration Statistics: Table 28 - Homeland Security". United States Department of Homeland Security.
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  64. ^ "Entry/Exit Overstay Report Fiscal Year 2018". United States Department of Homeland Security. Retrieved July 23, 2019.

External links[edit]