Baal-hanan

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Baal-hanan (Hebrew: בַּעַל חָנָן / בָּעַל חָנָן, Standard Báʿal ḥanan Tiberian Báʿal ḥānān / Bāʿal ḥānān) means "Baal has been gracious".[1] There are two men by this name in the Hebrew Bible.

In Genesis 36:38–39, Baal-hanan is a King of Edom. He is also mentioned in the King List in 1 Chronicles 1:49–50. He succeeded Shaul and was himself succeeded by Hadad. He was the son of Achbor.

He is called the son of Achbor; but the name of his native city is not given. For this and other reasons, Marqaurt supposes that "son of Achbor" is a duplicate of "son of Beor" (Gen. 36:32), and that "Baal-hanan" in the original text is given as the name of the father of the next king, Hadar.[2]

The date and even historicity[3] of his reign are unknown, as he is not mentioned in any other surviving source.

In the Books of Chronicles there is also a second man by this name, from the city of Geder. In 1 Chronicles 27:28 he is described as being responsible to King David for the care of olive and sycamore trees.

Preceded by
Saul of Rehoboth
King of Edom Succeeded by
Hadar

References[edit]

  1. ^ William W. Hallo; K. Lawson Younger (1 January 2000). The Context of Scripture: Monumental inscriptions from the biblical world. Brill. p. 198. ISBN 978-90-04-10619-2. 
  2. ^ Josef Markwart (Joseph Marquart), Fundamente Israelitischer und Jüdischer Gesch. 1896, pp. 10 et seq.
  3. ^ Joan E. Cook (1 December 2016). Genesis. Liturgical Press. p. 110. ISBN 978-0-8146-4768-4.