Badger State Games

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Badger State Games
First event1985
Occur everyYear
HeadquartersWausau/Central Wisconsin Convention & Visitors Bureau
Wausau, Wisconsin
Websitewww.badgerstategames.org

The Badger State Games are a series of annual Olympic-style multi-sport events for amateur athletes from the state of Wisconsin, held twice per year in Wausau. It is a member of the National Congress of State Games. The summer games have been held annually since they began in 1985, originally in Wisconsin's capital city of Madison, then briefly in the Fox Cities area before being relocated to their current home in Wausau in 2012. The winter games have been held in Wausau since they began in 1989.[1] Some sports are represented at both summer and winter editions of the games.

History[edit]

The Wisconsin Amateur Sports Corporation, a non-profit organization, began organizing the first edition of the Badger State Games in 1984. The plan was closely associated with Madison's bid for the 1987 National Sports Festival, which was ultimately awarded to Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina.[2] The inaugural Badger State Games were held in Madison in 1985, with ceremonies including an Olympic-style torch relay that circled the state over the course of two weeks. Wisconsin became the sixteenth state to hold a statewide multi-sport event,[3] with the National Congress of State Games created in 1988 to serve as their governing body.

In its first few years, the event continually grew, and was met with enthusiasm from the state government and local businesses who contributed to fundraising efforts.[4] It was consistently held in Madison during the last weekend of June. The first winter games were held in 1989 in Wausau, which exceeded attendance expectations despite temperatures of −10 °F (−23 °C). A special snowmobile-based torch relay was held in anticipation of the Winter Games.[5] These games also continued to be held annually, during the first weekend of February. By the end of the 1980s, the event had grown significantly and eight regional festivals were established to extend opportunities to even more athletes.[6]

Otto Breitenbach became the executive director of the Wisconsin Amateur Sports Corporation in 1988, and he was credited with raising the profile and scope of the games during his nine-year tenure.[7] By 1997, when Breitenbach retired, the Badger State Games was "considered by many to be the current standard bearer" among statewide multi-sport events,[8] and the country's largest relative to state population.[7][9]

At the 2006 summer games, Bill Wambach of Sun Prairie, Wisconsin, a long-time competitor, broke the national high-jump record for the 80- to 84-year-old division with a jump of 1.26 meters.[10]

In 2007, American Family Insurance became the primary sponsor of the games, and both the winter and summer events were officially renamed the American Family Insurance Badger State Games for two years.[11]

After the 2008 summer games, the Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation announced that the event would leave Madison and move to the Fox Cities region for at least three years.[12] The decision was made after the Fox Cities Sports Authority offered a grant of $180,000, which the Greater Madison Visitors and Convention Bureau refused to compete with.[7][13] The games had been in decline for several years up to that point, and there was no opening ceremony for the games' final year in Madison because of construction at James Madison Memorial High School.[7]

Following the 2010 Winter Games, the Wausau/Central Wisconsin Convention and Visitors Bureau withdrew its large annual contributions to the event, leaving it without a host city.[14] The 2011 Winter Games were ultimately held at venues across the state, although many were able to remain in the Wausau area.[15] That same year, the Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation announced that it would discontinue the Badger State Games, after operating at a loss for two years. The WSDC stated that the Games had served their purpose, and that the current market for amateur athletic events had become overly saturated, lowering participation in recent years.[16] The Wausau/Central Wisconsin Convention and Visitors Bureau agreed to purchase both the winter and summer games, holding both events in the Wausau area. It was announced that the summer games would not move to Wausau until 2015, following the completion of the WSDC's deal with the Fox Cities Sports Authority,[17] but the 2012 summer games were ultimately held in Wausau.[18]

The Wausau CVB changed the format of both events in 2015, spreading the dozens of events across a period of months rather than holding them all in the same weekend. This allowed for more sports to be represented, and more athletes to participate in more events.[19]

Sports[edit]

Summer Games[edit]

As of 2018, the summer games take place over four months and include events in 24 sports.

Winter Games[edit]

As of 2018, the winter games take place over three months and include events in 21 sports.

Editions[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 2 August 2011, Tom Held, "Badger State Games will end after 25 years"
  2. ^ Hughes, John. "Visit buoys Sports Fest hopes", Wisconsin State Journal, February 1, 1984.
  3. ^ a b Hughes, John. "Let the games begin", Wisconsin State Journal, July 12, 1985.
  4. ^ "Badger State Games Assistance - Joint Committee on Finance", Wisconsin Legislative Documents, 2001-03.
  5. ^ a b Zizzo, Robert. "Skiers steer clear of frostbite", Wisconsin State Journal, February 6, 1989.
  6. ^ "Boyceville heads to Madison for Badger State games", Chippewa Herald, June 20, 2001.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Mertz, Adam. "Badger State Games discontinued after 26-year run", Wisconsin State Journal, August 2, 2011.
  8. ^ a b Cohen, Andrew. "'Amateur Athletics At Its Finest'", Athletic Business, April 1997.
  9. ^ a b "Badger State Games kick off with ceremonies tonight", Wisconsin State Journal, June 27, 1997.
  10. ^ a b "Flying high: Sun Prairie's Bill Wambach, 80, sets a national high jump record at the Badger State Games", Wisconsin State Journal, June 26, 2006.
  11. ^ a b "Snowmobiling, trap shooting now part of Badger State Winter Games", La Crosse Tribune, January 26, 2008.
  12. ^ Robus, Clint. "Getting their final BSG kicks? These Badger State Games might be the last for some Madison participants", Wisconsin State Journal, June 29, 2008.
  13. ^ Baggot, Andy. "Know Your Madisonian: Vincent, group hope Badger State Games can rebound", Wisconsin State Journal, June 20, 2010.
  14. ^ a b Held, Tom. "Wausau picks up the welcome mat for Badger State Winter Games", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, January 23, 2010.
  15. ^ a b Badger State Games announces sites for 2011 Winter Games: Majority of events return to Wausau area, Badger State Games, October 2010.
  16. ^ "Badger State Games Ends, WSDC Restructures - Full Press Release",
  17. ^ "Badger State Winter Games - Game on! Badger State Games to continue!" Accessed 23 October 2011
  18. ^ a b "Badger State Games make summer debut in central Wis." Archived 2018-04-13 at the Wayback Machine, WKOW-TV, June 23, 2011.
  19. ^ a b Kulakowski, Stacia. "Badger State Winter Games bring thousands to Central Wisconsin", WSAW-TV, January 14, 2017.
  20. ^ Kroshus, Jay. "Earl, crowd give a warm welcome to Badger Games", Wisconsin State Journal, June 28, 1986.
  21. ^ Mayers, Jeff. "Bigger, better Games open", Wisconsin State Journal, June 27, 1987.
  22. ^ Hinz, Roy. "Bremser ignites Badger State Games", Wisconsin State Journal, June 25, 1988.
  23. ^ Hinz, Roy. "Games begin", Wisconsin State Journal, June 24, 1989.
  24. ^ Hinz, Roy. "Games' flame brightens night", Wisconsin State Journal, June 23, 1990.
  25. ^ Aehl, John. "She's a good sport: Brown fires up Badger State Games crowd", Wisconsin State Journal, June 29, 1991.
  26. ^ Youngblood, Kent. "Winners are everywhere at BSG", Wisconsin State Journal, June 29, 1992.
  27. ^ Youngblood, Kent. "Games suited for all", Wisconsin State Journal, June 25, 1993.
  28. ^ Youngblood, Kent. "Craig answers the call", Wisconsin State Journal, June 25, 1994.
  29. ^ "Opening day for Badger State Games", Wisconsin State Journal, June 24, 1995.
  30. ^ a b Cohen, Andrew. "Madison welcomes a little bit of Atlanta", Wisconsin State Journal, June 29, 1996.
  31. ^ "Games, Wisconsin style", Madison Capital Times, June 29, 1998.
  32. ^ Mulhern, Tom. "Badger State Games continue to roll in 15th year", Wisconsin State Journal, June 25, 1999.
  33. ^ a b Mulhern, Tom. "It's time, so let the games begin", Wisconsin State Journal, June 22, 2000.
  34. ^ "Games, continued", Wisconsin State Journal, June 23, 2001.
  35. ^ Anderson, Eric. "Memories", Wisconsin State Journal, June 29, 2002.
  36. ^ "18th Annual Badger State Games Strengthens Tradition of Sports for Everyone", Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation, July 15, 2002.
  37. ^ "Sunday Sports Extra", Wisconsin State Journal, June 29, 2003.
  38. ^ "Rain Fails to Dampen Spirit of 2003 Summer Games: Plans for next summer's 20th anniversary are underway", Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation, July 2, 2003.
  39. ^ "Fun and Games", Madison Capital Times, June 28, 2004.
  40. ^ "New Waukesha South High School Natatorium Named Site of 2005 Badger State Swimming", page 20. Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation, May 10, 2005.
  41. ^ "Give Badger Games medal for inspiration", Wisconsin State Journal, June 27, 2005.
  42. ^ "Summer 2005 Media Kit", Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation, 2005.
  43. ^ "Summer 2006 Media Kit", Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation, 2005.
  44. ^ Mulhern, Tom. "Opening Festival all about fun, drawing crowd", Wisconsin State Journal, June 22, 2007.
  45. ^ "Three New Sports Added To Summer Games", Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation, April 16, 2007.
  46. ^ a b c d Harris, Andrea. "Badger State Games Plan Book", Connective Campaigns, 2011.
  47. ^ Bleach, Michael. "Relocation to Fox Valley brings a twist", Wisconsin State Journal, June 21, 2009.
  48. ^ "Threat of severe weather won't stop Badger State Games" Archived 2018-04-13 at the Wayback Machine, WKOW-TV, June 21, 2013.
  49. ^ a b "Game On!", Midwest Meetings, May 28, 2014.
  50. ^ "Badger State Games", retrieved July 4, 2014.
  51. ^ "Badger State Games", retrieved August 15, 2015.
  52. ^ "Badger State Games", retrieved September 22, 2016.
  53. ^ "Badger State Games", retrieved September 1, 2017.
  54. ^ a b Hernandez, Rob. "Success has Winter Games looking ahead", Wisconsin State Journal, February 6, 1990.
  55. ^ "Winter Games has record participation", Wisconsin State Journal, January 31, 1991.
  56. ^ "State Games at hand", Madison Capital Times, January 30, 1992.
  57. ^ a b Engh, Brent. "Badger State Games snow a big go", Madison Capital Times, February 3, 1993.
  58. ^ "Badger State Games attract 4,600 athletes", Eau Claire Leader-Telegram, February 4, 1994.
  59. ^ Anderson, Eric. "Lack of snow isn't hurting Games", Wisconsin State Journal, February 3, 1995.
  60. ^ a b Imrie, Robert. "Competitors to brave subzero temperatures", Wisconsin State Journal, February 2, 1996.
  61. ^ Vogel, Eric."Stoking a competitive fire", Wisconsin State Journal, January 31, 1997.
  62. ^ a b "BSG celebrates 10th birthday", Madison Capital Times, February 4, 1998.
  63. ^ "Badger Games draw more", Wisconsin State Journal, February 17, 1999.
  64. ^ "Record turnout for Winter Games", Wisconsin State Journal, February 8, 2000.
  65. ^ a b "Turnout falls for Badger State Games", Wisconsin State Journal, February 5, 2002.
  66. ^ "Badger State Games put fun back into sports", Wisconsin State Journal, February 9, 2001.
  67. ^ "FitzRandolph finds a sponsor", Wisconsin State Journal, February 1, 2003.
  68. ^ "'Overall the Games were extremely successful:' A wrap-up of the 2003 Badger State Winter Games", Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation, February 19, 2003.
  69. ^ "Snow Blesses Badger State Winter Games", Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation, January 26, 2004.
  70. ^ "Badger State Winter Games Conclude", Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation, February 9, 2004.
  71. ^ "Governor Doyle to participate in Badger State Winter Games Opening Ceremony", Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation, February 1, 2005.
  72. ^ "Winter 2005 Media Kit", Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation, February 2005.
  73. ^ "BSG Athletes: Different Strokes For Different Folks", Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation, February 1, 2006.
  74. ^ "Badger State Winter Games Go On As Scheduled", WEAU 13 News, February 1, 2007.
  75. ^ "Badger games to last longer", Wisconsin State Journal, January 19, 2009.
  76. ^ "More Than A Thousand Athletes Compete In 2012 Badger State Games", WSAW-TV, February 5, 2012.
  77. ^ "Badger State Games kickoff this weekend", WXOW-TV, January 17, 2013.
  78. ^ "'Record participation' predicted at Badger State Games", Wausau Daily Herald, January 17, 2015.
  79. ^ "Badger State Winter Games come to an end" Archived 2018-04-13 at the Wayback Machine, WAOW-TV, February 1, 2015.
  80. ^ "Badger State Winter Games" Archived 2018-04-13 at the Wayback Machine Wausau/Central Wisconsin Convention & Visitors Bureau, January 2016.
  81. ^ Badger State Games, retrieved April 30, 2017.

External links[edit]