Baebia (gens)

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The gens Baebia was a plebeian family in ancient Rome. The first member of the gens who obtained the consulship was Gnaeus Baebius Tamphilus, in 182 BC. During the later Republic, the Baebii were frequently connected with the patrician family of the Aemilii.[1][2]

Praenomina[edit]

The Baebii used the praenomina Quintus, Gnaeus, Marcus, Lucius, Gaius, and Aulus.[1]

Branches and cognomina[edit]

The cognomina of the Baebii are Dives, Herennius, Sulca, and Tamphilus. The last is the only surname which appears on coins, where it is written Tampilus. All of the consuls and most of the praetors of this gens during the Republic belonged to this branch of the family.[1][3]

Members[edit]

This list includes abbreviated praenomina. For an explanation of this practice, see filiation.

Baebii Tamphili[edit]

Other Baebii of the Republic[edit]

Baebii under the Empire[edit]

Numerous Baebii are known from the Imperial era, particularly from inscriptions. Baebii with the praenomen Lucius are found concentrated around Saguntum in Hispania.[35]


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, William Smith, Editor.
  2. ^ John Briscoe, "The Second Punic War: The Elections for 216 B.C.," in Cambridge Ancient History: Rome and the Mediterranean to 133 B.C. (Cambridge University Press, 1989, reprinted 2003, 2nd ed.), vol. 8, p. 80. online.
  3. ^ Elizabeth Rawson, "Sallust on the Eighties?" Classical Quarterly 37 (1987), p. 166.
  4. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xxi. 6, 9, 18.
  5. ^ Marcus Tullius Cicero, Philippicae, v. 10.
  6. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xliv. 17, xlv. 17.
  7. ^ a b c T. Robert S. Broughton, The Magistrates of the Roman Republic (1952).
  8. ^ Auctor, De viris illustribus, 73.
  9. ^ P.A. Brunt, "The Settlement of Marian Veterans," in The Fall of the Roman Republic and Related Essays (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1988, reprinted 2004), p. 278. online
  10. ^ Andrew Lintott, "Political History, 146–95 B.C.," in Cambridge Ancient History: The Last Age of the Roman Republic, 146–43 B.C. (Cambridge University Press, 1994, 2nd ed., reprinted 2003), vol. 9, p. 95. online.
  11. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xxii. 34.
  12. ^ Pauly, August Friedrich von; Wissowa, Georg; Kroll, Wilhelm; Witte, K. (Kurt); Pauly, August Friedrich von (1893). Paulys Realencyclopädie der classischen Altertumswissenschaft. Neue Bearbeitung unter Mitwirkung zahlreicher Fachgenossen. Stuttgart, Druckenmüller Verlag. p. 2730. 
  13. ^ J.F. Lazenby, Hannibal's War: A Military History of the Second Punic War (University of Oklahoma Press, 1978), p. 74. online
  14. ^ C.J. Smith, The Roman Clan: The gens from Ancient Ideology to Modern Anthropology (Cambridge University Press, 2006), p. 330. online. For the passage, see Kurt A. Raaflaub, Social Struggles in Archaic Rome: New Perspectives on the Conflict of the Orders (Blackwell, 1986, 2005), p. 318. online.
  15. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xxx. 25.
  16. ^ Polybius, The Histories, xv. 1, 4.
  17. ^ Smith, William (1870). Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology. 1. Boston, Little. p. 452. 
  18. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xxxi. 6.
  19. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xxxvii. 47, 50, 57.
  20. ^ Polybius, The Histories, xxxiii. 6.
  21. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xlii. 6.
  22. ^ Jane D. Chaplin, Livy: Rome's Mediterranean Empire: Books Forty-One to Forty-Five and the Periochae (Oxford University Press, 2007), pp. 20 and 27. online.
  23. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xliv. 18.
  24. ^ Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita, xlv. 28, 31
  25. ^ John D. Grainger, The League of the Aitolians (Brill 1999), pp. 529–530. online. For more on this incident, see Erich S. Gruen, The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome (University of California Press, 1986), p. 515. online.
  26. ^ Gaius Sallustius Crispus, Jugurthine War, 33, 34.
  27. ^ Pauly, August Friedrich von; Wissowa, Georg; Kroll, Wilhelm; Witte, K. (Kurt); Pauly, August Friedrich von (1893). Paulys Realencyclopädie der classischen Altertumswissenschaft. Neue Bearbeitung unter Mitwirkung zahlreicher Fachgenossen. Stuttgart, Druckenmüller Verlag. p. 2729. 
  28. ^ Appianus, Bellum Civile, i. 48.
  29. ^ Appianus, Bellum Civile, i. 72.
  30. ^ Florus, Epitome de T. Livio Bellorum Omnium Annorum DCC libri duo, iii. 21.
  31. ^ Marcus Tullius Cicero, In Pisonem, 36.
  32. ^ Smith, William (1870). Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology. 1. Boston, Little. p. 453. 
  33. ^ Gaius Julius Caesar (attributed), De Bello Hispaniensis, 26.
  34. ^ Appianus, The Illyrian Wars, 13.
  35. ^ Françoise Des Boscs-Plateaux, Un parti hispanique à Rome?: ascension des élites hispaniques et pouvoir politique d'Auguste à Hadrien (Casa de Velázquez, 2005), p. 599. online.
  36. ^ Tacitus, Historiae, iv. 50, Agricola, 45.
  37. ^ Pliny the Younger, Epistulae, vii. 33.
  38. ^ Juvenal, Satirae, i. 34.
  39. ^ Géza Alföldy, "Spain," in Cambridge Ancient History: The High Empire A.D. 70–192 (Cambridge University Press, 2000), vol. 11, p. 454. online.
  40. ^ Barbara Burrell, Neokoroi: Greek cities and Roman emperors (Brill, 2004), p. 192. online.
  41. ^ Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus, Epistulae, iv. 9. § 16.
  42. ^ Aelius Spartianus, Hadrian, 5.
  43. ^ Lucius Cassius Dio Cocceianus, Roman History, lxxvi. 8, 9.
  44. ^ Aelius Lampridius, Alexander Severus, 3.
  45. ^ William Linn Westermann, The slave systems of Greek and Roman antiquity (American Philosophical Society, 1955), p. 131. online.
  46. ^ Flavius Vopiscus, Aurelian, 12.
  47. ^ CIL 12.2934
  48. ^ Michel Provost, Carte archeologique de la Gaule: Le Gard (1999), p. 386. online.

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William, ed. (1870). "article name needed". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.