Baha' al-din Zuhair

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Baha' al-din Zuhair (Arabic: بها الدين زهير ‎)(1186–1258) was an Arabian poet born at or near Mecca, and became celebrated as the best writer of prose and verse and the best calligrapher of his time.

Life[edit]

He entered the service of Sultan Malik As-Salih Najm ud-Din in Mesopotamia, and was with him at Damascus until the Sultan was betrayed and imprisoned. Baha' al-din then retired to Nablus where he remained until Najm ud-Din escaped and obtained possession of Egypt, whither he accompanied him in 1240. There he remained as the Sultan's confidential secretary until his death, due to an epidemic, in 1258. [1]

His poetry consists mostly of panegyric and brilliant occasional verse distinguished for its elegance. It has been published with English metrical translation by E. H. Palmer (2 vols., Cambridge, 1877). [1]

His life was written by his contemporary Ibn Khallikaan (see de Slane's trans. of his Biographical Dictionary, vol. i, pp. 542–545). [1]

Quotes[edit]

(translation: E.H. Palmer, The Poetical Works of Baha Ed-Din Zuheir, 2 vols., Cambridge 1877, p. 34)

References[edit]

Attribution
  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainThatcher, Griffithes Wheeler (1911). "Behā ud-Dīn Zuhair". In Chisholm, Hugh (ed.). Encyclopædia Britannica. 3 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 655.