Bahing language

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Bahing
Region Nepal
Ethnicity Bahing
Native speakers
12,000 (2011 census)[1]
Sino-Tibetan
Official status
Official language in
Nepal
Language codes
ISO 639-3 bhj
Glottolog bahi1252[2]
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Bahing (ancestor named Paiwa, Dungmowa, Rukhusalu, Waripsawa, Timriwa, Dhimriwa, Nayango, Dhayango, Khaliwa/Khaluwa, Rendukpa/Rendu, Rungbu/Rumdali[3]) is a language spoken by 11,658 people (2011 census) of the Bahing ethnic group in Nepal.[4] It belongs to the family of Kiranti languages, a subgroup of Sino-Tibetan.

The group Rumdali is also known as Nechali among some of them.

Names[edit]

Ethnologue lists the following alternate names for Bahing: Baying, Bayung, Ikke lo, Kiranti-Bayung, Pai Lo, Radu lo.

Geographical distribution[edit]

Bahing is spoken in the following locations of Nepal (Ethnologue).

Dialects[edit]

According to Ethnologue, Bahing consists of the Rumdali, Nechali, Tolacha, Moblocha, and Hangu dialects, with 85% or above intelligibility among all dialects. Rumdali is best understood by the most people.

Documentation[edit]

The Bahing language was described by Brian Houghton Hodgson (1857, 1858) as having a very complex verbal morphology. By the 1970s, only vestiges were left, making Bahing a case study of grammatical attrition and language death.

Phonology[edit]

Bahing and the related Khaling language have synchronic ten-vowel systems. The difference of [mərə] "monkey" vs. [mɯrɯ] "human being" is difficult to perceive for speakers of even neighboring dialects, which makes for "an unlimited source of fun to the Bahing people" (de Boer 2002 PDF).

Morphology[edit]

Hodgson (1857) reported a middle voice formed by a suffix -s(i) added to the verbal stem, corresponding to reflexives in other Kiranti languages (Opgenort.nl).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bahing at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Bahing". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  3. ^ linked to Rumjatar by Hanßon–Winter 1991
  4. ^ Detailed language map of eastern Nepal, see language #4 near the map's north/south center and about 2/3 of the way from east to west

External links[edit]