Baikal CPU

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Baikal
Produced2015
Designed byBaikal Electronics
Max. CPU clock rate900 MHz to 1,2 GHz
Instruction setMIPS32
Cores2

Baikal CPU is a line of MIPS and ARM-based microprocessors developed by fabless design firm Baikal Electronics, a spin-off of the Russian supercomputer company T-Platforms.

Design[edit]

Judging by the information available from online sources Baikal Electronics have selected a different approach compared to other Russian microprocessor initiatives such as the Elbrus-2SM, Elbrus-8S by MCST, and the Multiclet line of chips. The design by Baikal Electronics is based on existing commercial IP Cores from Imagination Technologies and ARM Holdings, compared to the more innovative approach of Multiclet, and the Elbrus CPU which has a history dating back to the Elbrus supercomputers from the Soviet Union.[1][2]

History[edit]

March, 2015, Synopsys Inc. announced that Baikal Electronics has selected Synopsys Solutions to accelerate design and verification of their advanced System on chips.[3]

May, 2015, Baikal Electronics and Imagination Technologies announced that the first commercial Baikal microprocessor will be based on the MIPS Warrior P5600, and it will be called Baikal-T1.[4][5] The first samples of the new CPU will be available starting from June, 2015.[6]

Baikal-T1[edit]

The Baikal-T1 mainly targets applications for networking and industrial automation, with features such as hardware support for virtualization and a high performance 128-bit SIMD engine.[7][8][9]

Produced 2015
Process CMOS 28 nm
Clock rate up to 1,2 GHz
Cores 2
Cache 1 MB L2 cache
Memory DDR3
Mass storage SATA, 6 Gbit/s
Connectivity
Package size 25×25 mm
Power consumption 5 W

Applications[edit]

March, 2016 it was announced on the Imagination Technologies blog that a desktop PC called the Tavolga Terminal,[10] also known as the Meadowsweet Terminal PC [11] is available to order from T-Platforms.[10] The computer is based on the Baikal-T1 CPU, SM750 Graphics processing unit and the Debian Linux operating system.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Imagination reports MIPS Warrior P-class CPU at the heart of new communications processor from Baikal Electronics". design-reuse.com. Archived from the original on 2015-05-29. Retrieved 2015-05-29.
  2. ^ "Russia To Replace AMD/Intel CPUs With 64-bit ARM Hardware". phoronix.com. Archived from the original on 2015-05-29. Retrieved 2015-05-29.
  3. ^ "Baikal Electronics Selects Synopsys Solutions to Accelerate the Design and Verification of Their Advanced SoCs". Synopsys, Inc. Archived from the original on 2015-05-29. Retrieved 2015-05-29.
  4. ^ "Baikal Electronics presented the processor Baikal-T1 - the first domestic high-performance system-on-chip". club.cnews.ru - Baikal Electronics LinkedIn page. Retrieved 2015-05-29.
  5. ^ "Imagination reports MIPS Warrior P-class CPU at the heart of new communications processor from Baikal Electronics". Imagination Technologies. Archived from the original on 2015-07-02. Retrieved 2015-06-03.
  6. ^ "Russian Baikal-T1 processor announced". CPU World - Baikal Electronics LinkedIn page. Archived from the original on 2015-05-29. Retrieved 2015-05-29.
  7. ^ "Baikal T1 is a Dual Core MIPS P5600 Communication Processor". cnx-software.com. Archived from the original on 2015-06-02. Retrieved 2015-06-03.
  8. ^ "Baikal-T1 communications processor features high-performance MIPS P5600 CPU". Alexandru Voica. Archived from the original on 2015-05-30. Retrieved 2015-06-03.
  9. ^ "MIPS P-class CPU features in Baikal-T1". newelectronics. Archived from the original on 2015-07-31. Retrieved 2015-06-03.
  10. ^ a b "T-Platforms introduces MIPS-based Tavolga Terminal computer for Linux users". Imagination Technologies. Archived from the original on 2016-10-20. Retrieved 2016-10-17.
  11. ^ "Russian PC makers are back". fudzilla. Archived from the original on 2016-10-18. Retrieved 2016-10-17.
  12. ^ "Tavolga Terminal TP-T22BT Debian 8 All-in-One Computer is Powered by Baikal-T1 MIPS Processor". CNXsoft. Archived from the original on 2016-10-18. Retrieved 2016-10-17.

External links[edit]