Baise horse

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Baise horse
Other names Guangxi
Country of origin China
Traits
Distinguishing features Small, but both strong and quick; thrives at high altitudes

The Baise horse (also known as the Guangxi) is a pony-sized horse breed native to the autonomous region of Guangxi, in southeastern China.[1] Like other Asian breeds (the Mongolian horse in particular), it thrives at high altitudes and roams freely when not working. Guangxi's mild climate has long favored horse breeding; bronze statues from the third to the first centuries BCE exist of horses very similar in conformation to the Baise.

Breed characteristics[edit]

The Baise horse is small, with an average height of 11 to 11.2 hands (44 to 46 inches, 112 to 117 cm); it is smaller than other breeds in northern and western China.[2] Its head is heavy, with a straight profile and wide jaw; it has a medium-length neck, running down to straight shoulders. Its legs are strong and well-developed, with strong hooves The usual coat colors are black, chestnut, gray and bay. The Baise is strong and quick with a willing, able temperament. It is used as a riding and pack horse for tourism, on the farm and in harness; it is also used for meat.[3]

Baise horses are an important part of Guangxi village life, and are included in traditional wedding celebrations. The National Baise Horse Genetic Resources Conservation Area is a protected area in Guangxi.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ling, Yinghui; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun; Cheng, Yuejiao; Wang, Yanping; Han, Jianlin; Jin, Dapeng; Mang, Lai; Mahmut, Halik (2010). "Identification of Y Chromosome Genetic Variations in Chinese Indigenous Horse Breeds" (PDF). Journal of Heredity. 101 (5): 639–643. doi:10.1093/jhered/esq047. PMID 20497969. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 27, 2013. Retrieved 27 January 2013. 
  2. ^ Sun, Yu-jiang; Min, Ling-jiang; Chen, Jian-xing; Mang, Lai (2009). "Analysis on Genetic Resource Characteristics of Southwest Horse Population in China". Acta Agriculturae Boreali-Sinica (2009–02). Archived from the original on January 27, 2013. Retrieved January 27, 2013. 
  3. ^ Ling 2010, p. 642.